Honey gourami care guide

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Mii

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credit to Dippiedee for re-wording the original post and making it easier to read (grammar and stuff). they are a much better writer than i am.

Introduction
The Honey Gourami is a small peaceful gourami and therefore a good choice for community tanks. They are extremely hardy and while maintaining stable water parameters is still important, a little fluctuation is unlikely to kill them. Keep in mind that hardiness isn't an excuse to neglect fish as they are still live animals. Bad care won't instantly kill them, but will certainly have a negative impact on their health. They are considered beginner friendly due to their previously mentioned hardiness and peaceful nature.

Tankmates
The Honey Gourami is a social fish and should be kept in pairs or groups, with the females outnumbering the males. When picking tankmates avoid other Gouramis as they may bully the Honey Gouramis. Also to be avoided are fin nipping fish such as tiger barbs and skirt tetras.

Commonly Mislabeled
Orange, yellow, or red Thick Lipped Gouramis are often mislabeled as color morphs of honeys. Make sure you don't accidentally mix the two together as the Thick Lipped Gourami will see the honeys as competition and bully them. Thick Lipped Gouramis have larger foreheads, thicker lips, stockier bodies and a clear/white tail. They come in bright oranges and reds that you don't often see in Honeys.

They are great fish too, and I will probably post a care guide for them too in the future, but it's always important to make sure you know what fish you're buying. here's a video of my thick lipped gourami who has too many names:

here are my female golden honeys mango and lemon


Housing Requirements
They are active, intelligent fish and will love a well planted aquarium. Provide an aquascape with tall plants such as amazon swords. As they are a top dwellering species, places to hide near the surface will make them feel safe. Other fish will also provide mental stimulation for their curious nature. As they have a labyrinth organ which lets them breathe air from the surface, make sure there is a bit of space between your lid and the water in the tank. While you could probably get away with less space, the ideal minimum tank size would be 10 gallons. Could you get away with 5? Probably. Would your fish be happy? It's hard to tell as fish can't talk, but more space would certainly be appreciated. If you want a Gourami for tanks less than 10 gallons I recommend you look into either a single betta, or group of Sparkling Gourami.

Feeding
Feeding them is fairly easy; you can use a quality protean rich flake food as their staple diet and supplement with live or frozen-thawed food like blood worms. If they won't eat, crush up the flakes really small until they get used to them, then you can switch to regular size. Avoid overfeeding them by monitoring how much food is being eaten during feeding time. If it’s taking them a few minutes to scarf everything down, you’re probably feeding them too much. Fast them once weekly to prevent indigestion.


Water parameters are in the care sheet below; use a thermometer to measure your water temp and check it frequently. Check your water parameters frequently too; I recommend the API master test kit and the API water hardness test kit.

Quick Care Sheet
Temperament: Peaceful
Tankmates: Many, due to their peaceful nature. Avoid other gouramis and fin nipping fish.
Size: About 2 inches
Minimun Tank Size: 10 gallons
Ideal Tank Set up: Planted with tall plants for hides near the surface. Make sure they have access to air at the surface to use their labyrinth organ in case their isn't enough oxygen in the water.
Temperature: 70-82F
Ph and water hardness aren't very important as long as they're not super extreme or unstable
substrate is not important as they are a top dwelling fish, although I personally don't use sharp substrate like gravel even for top dwellers as they still might go near the bottom, try to hide under something, and end up getting scraped up. This is from personal experience as it happened with one of my bettas.
Feeding: Protein rich flakes supplemented with live or frozen food like bloodworms or brine shrimp.
Breeding: They are bubble nesters. For breeding advice I suggest you look elsewhere as I have no experience or knowledge in breeding fish.


re-written with better grammar and layout by Dippiedee original care guide by myself.
 
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Falena

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Pretty good care guide! :)
Just a couple of constructive criticisms if you don't mind? Might I suggest you add a little more grammar and punctuation. Trust me, more people will be inclined to read it all the way through if it's easier to digest. And thats both beneficial to them and you! I'm not trying to be rude at all, the information is good! just a little difficult to read.

And one last minor correction. You mention a "colour morph" of the thick lipped gourami being not dissimilar to a dwarf gourami. That's not a colour morph, that is in fact the natural an wild variant. The red colour is the selectively bred morph.
Other than those two points it's a great guide!
 
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Mii

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Falena said:
Pretty good care guide! :)
Just a couple of constructive criticisms if you don't mind? Might I suggest you add a little more grammar and punctuation. Trust me, more people will be inclined to read it all the way through if it's easier to digest. And thats both beneficial to them and you! I'm not trying to be rude at all, the information is good! just a little difficult to read.

And one last minor correction. You mention a "colour morph" of the thick lipped gourami being not dissimilar to a dwarf gourami. That's not a colour morph, that is in fact the natural an wild variant. The red colour is the selectively bred morph.
Other than those two points it's a great guide!
sorry i'm kind of a bad writer. i tried my best and i know it's a bit long, i'll try to make it shorter if i can if you have any specific suggestions on what i should change let me know
 
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Falena

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Mii said:
sorry i'm kind of a bad writer. i tried my best and i know it's a bit long, i'll try to make it shorter if i can if you have any specific suggestions on what i should change let me know
Oh no, its not that its too long or that its written badly. Just maybe consider adding more punctuation like commas and full stops. And consider dividing sections up into seperate paragraphs.
For example :
Species:
Care:
Behaviour:
Tank size:
Temp:
Compatibility:
Etc , You get the idea :) it just makes it a lot easier on the reader. And that way they can find what they're looking for too, incase they only want one specific piece of information. Hope this helps!
 
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Mii

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Falena said:
Pretty good care guide! :)
Just a couple of constructive criticisms if you don't mind? Might I suggest you add a little more grammar and punctuation. Trust me, more people will be inclined to read it all the way through if it's easier to digest. And thats both beneficial to them and you! I'm not trying to be rude at all, the information is good! just a little difficult to read.

And one last minor correction. You mention a "colour morph" of the thick lipped gourami being not dissimilar to a dwarf gourami. That's not a colour morph, that is in fact the natural an wild variant. The red colour is the selectively bred morph.
Other than those two points it's a great guide!
tried to make it easier to read, separated it into different sections, and changed info on wild type thick lipped gouramis
 
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Falena

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Mii said:
tried to make it easier to read, separated it into different sections, and changed info on wild type thick lipped gouramis
Oh yes, that's looking a lot better! Much easier to read :)
 
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Mii

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Falena said:
Oh yes, that's looking a lot better! Much easier to read :)
what kind of fish is the one in your profile picture?
 
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Dippiedee

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Introduction
The Honey Gourami is a small peaceful gourami and therefore a good choice for community tanks. They are extremely hardy and while maintaining stable water parameters is still important, a little fluctuation is unlikely to kill them. Keep in mind that hardiness isn't an excuse to neglect fish as they are still live animals. Bad care won't instantly kill them, but will certainly have a negative impact on their health. They are considered beginner friendly due to their previously mentioned hardiness and peaceful nature.

Tankmates
The Honey Gourami is a social fish and should be kept in pairs or groups, with the females outnumbering the males. When picking tankmates avoid other Gouramis as they may bully the Honey Gouramis. Also to be avoided are fin nipping fish such as tiger barbs and skirt tetras.

Commonly Mislabeled
Orange, yellow, or red Thick Lipped Gouramis are often mislabeled as color morphs of honeys. Make sure you don't accidentally mix the two together as the Thick Lipped Gourami will see the honeys as competition and bully them. Thick Lipped Gouramis have larger foreheads, thicker lips, stockier bodies and a clear/white tail. They come in bright oranges and reds that you don't often see in Honeys.

They are great fish too, and I will probably post a care guide for them too in the future, but it's always important to make sure you know what fish you're buying. here's a video of my thick lipped gourami who has too many names:

VIDEO

Housing Requirements
They are active, intelligent fish and will love a well planted aquarium. Provide an aquascape with tall plants such as amazon swords. As they are a top dwellering species, places to hide near the surface will make them feel safe. Other fish will also provide mental stimulation for their curious nature. As they have a labyrinth organ which lets them breathe air from the surface, make sure there is a bit of space between your lid and the water in the tank. While you could probably get away with less space, the ideal minimum tank size would be 10 gallons. Could you get away with 5? Probably. Would your fish be happy? It's hard to tell as fish can't talk, but more space would certainly be appreciated. If you want a Gourami for tanks less than 10 gallons I recommend you look into either a single betta, or group of Sparkling Gourami.

Feeding
Feeding them is fairly easy; you can use a quality protean rich flake food as their staple diet and supplement with live or frozen-thawed food like blood worms. If they won't eat, crush up the flakes really small until they get used to them, then you can switch to regular size. Avoid overfeeding them by monitoring how much food is being eaten during feeding time. If it’s taking them a few minutes to scarf everything down, you’re probably feeding them too much. Fast them once weekly to prevent indigestion.


Water parameters are in the care sheet below; use a thermometer to measure your water temp and check it frequently. Check your water parameters frequently too; I recommend the API master test kit and the API water hardness test kit.

Quick Care Sheet
Temperament: Peaceful
Tankmates: Many, due to their peaceful nature. Avoid other gouramis and fin nipping fish.
Size: About 2 inches
Minimun Tank Size: 10 gallons
Ideal Tank Set up: Planted with tall plants for hides near the surface. Make sure they have access to air at the surface to use their labyrinth organ in case their isn't enough oxygen in the water.
Temperature: 70-82F
Ph and water hardness aren't very important as long as they're not super extreme or unstable
substrate is not important as they are a top dwelling fish, although I personally don't use sharp substrate like gravel even for top dwellers as they still might go near the bottom, try to hide under something, and end up getting scraped up. This is from personal experience as it happened with one of my bettas.
Feeding: Protein rich flakes supplemented with live or frozen food like bloodworms or brine shrimp.
Breeding: They are bubble nesters. For breeding advice I suggest you look elsewhere as I have no experience or knowledge in breeding fish.



Great care guide. I just did a grammar and layout check to make it a little easier to read, I hope you dont mind.
 
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Mii

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Dippiedee said:
Introduction
The Honey Gourami is a small peaceful gourami and therefore a good choice for community tanks. They are
Great care guide. I just did a grammar and layout check to make it a little easier to read, I hope you dont mind.
thanks. i actually copy-pasted yours (and credited you at the top) because it was so much better written than mine.
 
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Dippiedee

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No worries, I love to write haha. Credit wasnt necessary but thank you :D
 
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Mii

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Hey if any mods want to pin this pist as a care guide that would be good as there currently isn't an official Fishlore honey gourami care guide Mike smee82 Lucy
 
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Mike

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Ok stickied - thanks for the write up!
 
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LadfromLondon

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Mii

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LadfromLondon said:
Nice care guide! How many would fit in a 10G? I’m asking for my 12G

Current stock:
1 Male HG
9 Green Neon Tetras
Ramshorn Snails
1x Peacock Gudgeon
i would get a couple female honeys and a few less green neons unless you're willing to do a lot of water changes. a single honey will get lonely by itself. make sure it's a true honey not a thick lipped gourami, a thick lipped gourami will be fine by itself as they are not as social, and in fact i would recommend it be the only gourami in the tank as they are more aggressive than honeys. make sure you never mix thick lipped gouramis with honeys. bad things happen if you mix thick lipped gouramis with honeys.
 
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Mii

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Mike said:
Ok stickied - thanks for the write up!
can you do the thing where you make the word honey gourami link to it when you click it?
 
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Mike

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Mii said:
can you do the thing where you make the word honey gourami link to it when you click it?
Sure - it's added now.
 
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Mii

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omg it's so cool!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 
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