What Kind of Fish Do You Simply Not Understand Why People Keep?

I was listening to a podcast recently, and the interviewer asked the interviewee what fish they simply don't understand why people keep it, and that got me thinking. What kind of fish do others out there simply not understand why others want it?

So here is mine and my reasoning.

1) Monster fish.
Pretty obvious why, but just going to throw it out there, I do own a Mbu Puffer, but he was a rescue. I actually decided against getting one a while ago due to the size. My ultimate reason for this is why would your average person want a fish that grows 4ft or bigger. Being honest, the demographic of people who want them compared to those who can actually have a place for them is so off. I can walk into almost any shop and say 'I want a red-tailed catfish' and next week I pay $14.99 for one whom I can then keep in a 10 gallon like many others- let alone, in 4 months you're feeding it whole frozen shrimp, and in a year its like a pound a day and it just keeps growing. I am not going to limit this to just those either, I include things like oscars, red devils, Dovii, common pleco, god forbid if anybody gets an arapaima. I am not here to state these fish are not cool/pretty, but just stating that the majority of them who have them, probably shouldn't, and the retail industry sells them like mad. In addition to this, normal people think something like a 29 gallon is a 'big' tank and a 55 is 'huge'.

My second one, I hardly understand, but think is ridiculous is glo-fish.
There's all these other options out there to have a slice of nature with silk plants or fake plants with nice pea gravel, and you choose to get the neon pink gravel and have blue rainbow sharks and that bright green betta as a display tank. Sure? I guess.

This might just be my complaints with the retail fish industry in general, but I know there are some people who just don't understand getting a certain fish for the amount of work it is. Thank you for reading!
 
Solution
I doubt they sell for several hundred. Usually a fully grown redbelly goes for 50-75€. The Geryi's indeed is rarer and getting a fully grown specimen is a jackpot for a collector. The price is likely also so high to keep people away that only want to own a little monster but don't know whack about fishkeeping.
I here ya. But do you think this would be found anywhere else but a fish tank .View attachment 766921View attachment 766922
No, the potential obviously exists for colour mutations, but they wouldn't survive long in the wild. Although, just out of interest, when I was working in Belize (a long time ago), we went to this lake where the large predatory cichlid, Petenia splendida, was abundant. Most were a dark bluish grey colour with stripes, and not very visible from the top. But there was also a gold morph, bright gold like a goldfish. Nowhere near as common as the normal ones but we would see them quite frequently, they were obviously surviving there despite the presence of various fishing birds.
 
I here ya. But do you think this would be found anywhere else but a fish tank .View attachment 766921View attachment 766922
Tons of brightly colored fish live naturally in the ocean. Since corals and anemones are colorful they still have good camouflage/ or their colors are warning of poison.
Isn’t there anywhere freshwater with wild colorful discus?
I mean, neon/cardinal tetras, lemon tetras, celestial pearl danios, scarlet and blue Badis, Everglades Pygmy sunfish, some of the wild type bettas, .... off the top of my head.
Are all colorful. And wild.
Even if it’s only the males when in breeding colors.
 
Tons of brightly colored fish live naturally in the ocean. Since corals and anemones are colorful they still have good camouflage/ or their colors are warning of poison.
Isn’t there anywhere freshwater with wild colorful discus?
I mean, neon/cardinal tetras, lemon tetras, celestial pearl danios, scarlet and blue Badis, Everglades Pygmy sunfish, some of the wild type bettas, .... off the top of my head.
Are all colorful. And wild.
Even if it’s only the males when in breeding colors.
Nope you won’t find these in the wild. Anywhere in the Amazon. These colors are man made. Kind of like glo-fish.
 
I don’t like glo-fish either. No frankenfish for me! Do you ever wonder how many people who would basically have fainting fits over gmo products buy these little beasties?

You've inspired me.
 

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Nope you won’t find these in the wild. Anywhere in the Amazon. These colors are man made. Kind of like glo-fish.
The difference is that discus (also goldfish and angelfish and others) have been selectively bred to achieve the colour varieties that we see in aquaria, utilising naturally occurring mutations and fixing these by choosing who breeds with who. In the wild while some mutations do occur, most individuals would not survive to breed, any any that did would breed with normal ones, ie the mutation could not be fixed in the population. Glo-fish on the other hand are genetically modified using genes from other organisms (I believe including fluorescent corals and sea anemones). Flower horns and blood parrots are hybrids of two different species that would not occur naturally in the wild.
Anyway, the wild type discus are not exactly drab, Personally I think they are among the most attractive types!
 
The difference is that discus (also goldfish and angelfish and others) have been selectively bred to achieve the colour varieties that we see in aquaria, utilising naturally occurring mutations and fixing these by choosing who breeds with who. In the wild while some mutations do occur, most individuals would not survive to breed, any any that did would breed with normal ones, ie the mutation could not be fixed in the population. Glo-fish on the other hand are genetically modified using genes from other organisms (I believe including fluorescent corals and sea anemones). Flower horns and blood parrots are hybrids of two different species that would not occur naturally in the wild.
Anyway, the wild type discus are not exactly drab, Personally I think they are among the most attractive types!
Technically blood parrots could occur in the wild. They are a mix of redhead cichlids and Midas cichlids which are both from the general area of Central America. So if they bred in captivity to create the hybrid I could image they could breed in the wild as well.
 
Just my two cents - I think GloFish are actually a net good. Their only "crime" is being incredibly gaudy - far from the worst! But it offers a humane alternative to those who might've otherwise gotten a dyed fish. I don't see how they're different from brightly colored bettas, as both are "genetically modified" by humans, other than that GloFish didn't have to be inbred to get their bright colors. I don't have GloFish anymore though, so I don't know if anything changed in the past few years ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
 
Technically blood parrots could occur in the wild. They are a mix of redhead cichlids and Midas cichlids which are both from the general area of Central America. So if they bred in captivity to create the hybrid I could image they could breed in the wild as well.
Still a really ugly hybrid though . Just because something CAN exist naturally, doesn't mean it SHOULD .
 
Technically blood parrots could occur in the wild. They are a mix of redhead cichlids and Midas cichlids which are both from the general area of Central America. So if they bred in captivity to create the hybrid I could image they could breed in the wild as well.
It is possible but unlikely. Most species in the wild, even if they occur naturally together, have evolved mechanisms such as mate choice or habitat / nest site selection that avoid hybridisation and keep the two species separate. In captivity where there is no choice these mechanisms will often be overcome as the urge to breed is stronger.
 
So lets talk the biggest scam with Glo-Fish. They are literally patented. They have a patent on a gene for fish. Like- seriously?

I get it. You made a product, and you want rights to it, but this is the life of something- not your property. Nobody should 'own' rights to a life or a genetic for that matter. For god sakes the gene isn't even for the fish! Its from jellyfish!

This idea is really ahead of the times in a way as there isn't really a consensus for how to handle issues like this. I mean honestly, 70 years ago the USA was spraying the pesticide DDT on entire neighborhoods and spraying it on every meal of the day- look how that turned out. I love my country.

Moving on-

You legally cannot breed glo-fish and re-sell them. You may breed them to get more for yourself, but not for public sale.

What makes this worse in my opinion, which ties into the meme I made, is that to purchase Glo-fish, from the one farm in florida that produces them, they are ridiculously expensive, but everybody can order them wholesale. They are so expensive that the cost to order them and ship them is more expensive that Petsmart sells them because they have a deal with the Glo-fish company, basically allowing Petsmart a monopoly on the 'product'. Not a true monopoly, but basically they can run a sellers-market, with a limit, with them. This makes this ethically and economically questionable to me.

The ethics of it are up for debate, but splicing jellyfish genes into common fish for neon colors, although something that can be done, but more is a question of should it be done.

I do not believe this is in the same subject area of hybrids, as they happen all the time.
These happen naturally in the wilderness of my state: Michigan
Tiger Muskellunge = Northern Pike/Muskellunge
Tiger Trout = Brown Trout/Brook Trout (Literally a trophy in the waters here- would kill to see one)
Coywolf = Coyote/Wolf

Many plants hybridize constantly, but you never notice it.

Natural Hybridization is really something that is quite common and is not in the same discussion as gene splicing. If you are talking about creating specimens in the lab, like crossing whales and killifish, you might just be a mad scientist and yes that is the same ballfield as Glo-Fish.

This is my opinion. Feel free to disagree, but if you have a differing opinion I mean no harm, keep it peaceful Thank you for reading.
 
I was joking lol. Even if that club exists im not cool enough for it
That’s what you say now.... but I know your secret. You’re just saying that to make me lose interest... just like the terribilis Illuminati on another forum earlier. It’s all coming together now...
 
Any fish that just seems artificial holds no appeal to me. As mentioned already, glo-fish, albino fish, and fancy varieties of fish certainly fall into that group. I would add things like parrot fish and flowerhorns to that group as well. Furthermore, it often baffles me that a color morph of a fish can be so readily available, when the wild version of the same species can be so hard to find. An example of this would be the gold barb, Barbodes semifasciolatus. The wild version of this fish seems so much more attractive to me, but I've never seen it for sale.
Just replying to this old post. I'm fortunate, because there is a specialist shop here in the Netherlands that sells many wild-caught tropical fish and rarer ones, too. I just looked, and they currently have Barbodes semifasciolatus. I guess you don't live over here, though. I'm just posting so that you know there are businesses that do sell fish you might think are only found in books.
 
I was listening to a podcast recently, and the interviewer asked the interviewee what fish they simply don't understand why people keep it, and that got me thinking. What kind of fish do others out there simply not understand why others want it?

So here is mine and my reasoning.

1) Monster fish.
Pretty obvious why, but just going to throw it out there, I do own a Mbu Puffer, but he was a rescue. I actually decided against getting one a while ago due to the size. My ultimate reason for this is why would your average person want a fish that grows 4ft or bigger. Being honest, the demographic of people who want them compared to those who can actually have a place for them is so off. I can walk into almost any shop and say 'I want a red-tailed catfish' and next week I pay $14.99 for one whom I can then keep in a 10 gallon like many others- let alone, in 4 months you're feeding it whole frozen shrimp, and in a year its like a pound a day and it just keeps growing. I am not going to limit this to just those either, I include things like oscars, red devils, Dovii, common pleco, god forbid if anybody gets an arapaima. I am not here to state these fish are not cool/pretty, but just stating that the majority of them who have them, probably shouldn't, and the retail industry sells them like mad. In addition to this, normal people think something like a 29 gallon is a 'big' tank and a 55 is 'huge'.

My second one, I hardly understand, but think is ridiculous is glo-fish.
There's all these other options out there to have a slice of nature with silk plants or fake plants with nice pea gravel, and you choose to get the neon pink gravel and have blue rainbow sharks and that bright green betta as a display tank. Sure? I guess.

This might just be my complaints with the retail fish industry in general, but I know there are some people who just don't understand getting a certain fish for the amount of work it is. Thank you for reading!

Glofish. They just look so unnatural
 
I really don't try to understand. Choice is a good thing and taste is a personal thing. Between the fact that a)it doesn't affect me one single bit, i don't need to understand and b)i was raised right and try hard to not judge. A lot of people do not like plecos, while i love them! See, that street goes both ways.
 

V1K

Sadly they do exist...
I see. Maybe LHAquatics meant to say "I can't believe they even exist" instead of "I don't believe they even exist"? That would make more sense than disliking a fish you think doesn't exist :D.

Anyway, I think it's really logical that they do exist, because the market for bettas and the market for glofish overlap big time.
 
I see. Maybe LHAquatics meant to say "I can't believe they even exist" instead of "I don't believe they even exist"? That would make more sense than disliking a fish you think doesn't exist :D.

Anyway, I think it's really logical that they do exist, because the market for bettas and the market for glofish overlap big time.
edited it just for you :)
 
glo fish. I can imagnie a few zebra danios in a planted tank, that would be kinda cool. But the tetras, and the bettas, and the neon gravel and plastic neon plants, it just seems wrong. Also with the flowerhorns, and the huge fish like arrowana's.
They make glo arowanas and flowerhorns? Why though, they are gorgeous by themselves, why put on the glo stuff?

I also don't get long finned serpai tetras. So you take a fish who is known to nip fins, and who also needs others of its own kind, and put long fins on it. Worst combo ever lol.

Though I have heard that it was a myth created by keeping them in small groups.
 
I dislike glo fish of any sorts. They just look like someone threw up on a fish. Blood parrots are also some of the ugliest fish I've ever seen I just dislike their deformations. Besides when I was very young, I dislike many goldfish and don't understand why so many people like them. I don't even understand why people would want to put them in a pond outside when you can fill it with koi instead. Arowana are pretty but I don't understand why you would get a huge fish that enjoys jumping out of a tank. IMO no tank is the correct size for them because they are going to want to jump as that is what their instincts tell them to do. I understand why people like angelfish but I haven't personally ever really enjoyed looking at them. Everytime I go to a fish store I guess I have just seen poorly bred ones, but I imagine I might try to keep them one day to see why everyone enjoys them. Finally I don't understand people's interest in tiger barbs and why people keep them. Although they really aren't too aggressive if kept in a large school, I dislike how the safest option just too make sure they don't decide to nip fins of other fish is to keep them in a species only tank. There's so many other options for fish that are nice looking and people choose one of the few schooling fish that are just horrible in my opinion.
 
I completely understand the appeal of wild-caught aquarium fish. It's actually prevented some fish from becoming extinct. At the same time I feel that it may be more "sustainable" to only purchase tank bred/raised fish. I am wondering if anyone knows of a (fairly) comprehensive list of aquarium fish that are mostly captive bred locally/within the US (or maybe regionalized for people in other countries) vs. wild caught fish that are shipped 1/2 way around the world only to die because my tap water is too hard. Any links, ideas, or advice appreciated!
 
I've never seen Glofish, as they are (thankfully) illegal over here. I don't like the idea of them as aquarium fish. Do you know there are some crazy people in the US who eat them, hoping to gain their glowing attributes?
 

V1K

I'll also go for blind tetras.. I dont get that at all. What is the appeal?
Now that's something I didn't know to exist! Looks creepy. I guess the appeal is the shock factor. If you want to give your guests nightmares, this is a go-to fish :D. Anyway, it being a normal healthy fish (even if it doesn't look like it) it's still better than this:
Tattooed Fish.
What the heck, poor thing.
I've never seen Glofish, as they are (thankfully) illegal over here.
I thought that Glofish are illegal in Lithuania too, since we're in EU too and the same law should apply, but I often see them in local forums and groups. I'm afraid those might be dyed fish, which is much worse, but I'm not sure.
 
Is that real??
Yes. I actually owned a few tattooed white skirt tetras when I was a grade schooler (my dad did most of the fish purchases and we didn't know better).

I haven't seen any in recent years, probably because glo-fish have taken over the unnatural color market and genetic manipulation is less viscerally nasty and lethal than the alternatives, but people have and do inject dyes into fish for aesthetic reasons.

I can understand why someone would keep blind cave tetras, simply because they're very unusual. Plus, their strangeness is completely natural, no mutilation or genertic shenanigans requires.
 
I completely understand the appeal of wild-caught aquarium fish. It's actually prevented some fish from becoming extinct. At the same time I feel that it may be more "sustainable" to only purchase tank bred/raised fish. I am wondering if anyone knows of a (fairly) comprehensive list of aquarium fish that are mostly captive bred locally/within the US (or maybe regionalized for people in other countries) vs. wild caught fish that are shipped 1/2 way around the world only to die because my tap water is too hard. Any links, ideas, or advice appreciated!
I really like wild angels, they look so much cooler than regular ones, with all the red and from what I've seen bigger dorsal fins.
Is that real??
Yes, sadly...
 

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