Beginner Anenomes

RandomFishBoi

Member
What anenomes are suitable for someone with little saltwater experience (me).
 

SinisterCichlids

Member
What size tank? Anenome's are really tough to keep in tanks that haven't been established a long time or someone with beginner SW experience. They require very specific lighting, temperature, salinity, and other important SW metrics. I believe rock flower anemones are easier than your Magnificent or Carpet Sea anemones you see paired with clownfish.

Someone with more saltwater experience might be able to help you out. But I just wanted to share what limited knowledge I do know about them in the meantime! Maybe starting with a coral that is a bit more forgiving such as zoanthids or green star polyps?
 
  • Thread Starter

RandomFishBoi

Member

Jesterrace

Member
SinisterCichlids said:
What size tank? Anenome's are really tough to keep in tanks that haven't been established a long time or someone with beginner SW experience. They require very specific lighting, temperature, salinity, and other important SW metrics. I believe rock flower anemones are easier than your Magnificent or Carpet Sea anemones you see paired with clownfish.

Someone with more saltwater experience might be able to help you out. But I just wanted to share what limited knowledge I do know about them in the meantime! Maybe starting with a coral that is a bit more forgiving such as zoanthids or green star polyps?
Carpet 'Nems are known to eat fish, so I strongly recommend avoiding them. Bubble Tips seem to be the starting point for most folks with 'nems as they don't get ridiculously huge and are a popular choice for Clownfish.

@ the OP as mentioned 'nems generally require bright light and well established tanks to do well. So you need to make sure you have got a solid coral grow light and a tank that has been set up for a while to give yourself the best shot of success with them. They also are sensitive to water parameters so you definitely want RODI Water to give yourself the best chance of success. Be aware that any 'Nem will go where it wants to go and will plant itself wherever it wants. They can also sting corals in the process. I put this out there as many folks get them and then express regret when they park themselves where the owner doesn't want it. They are also known for getting into powerheads and causing havoc to the tank. They may or may not host a clownfish as many clowns are captive bred these days. In some cases you can train the clown to use the 'nem but that depends on the individual fish.

I'm not saying don't get one, just saying you need to be aware that it's not just as simple as throwing one in and seeing a cool symbiotic relationship with a clownfish and a lot of planning and forethought needs to go into it before purchasing one.
 
  • Thread Starter

RandomFishBoi

Member
Jesterrace said:
I'm not saying don't get one, just saying you need to be aware that it's not just as simple as throwing one in and seeing a cool symbiotic relationship with a clownfish and a lot of planning and forethought needs to go into it before purchasing one.
Well maybe I'll get clownfish or maybe I won't, but I'm not really all about the clownfish but rather just the anenome itself. If I get an anenome does it need a clownfish or will it do a lot better with a clownfish?
 

fish 321

Member
RandomFishBoi said:
Well maybe I'll get clownfish or maybe I won't, but I'm not really all about the clownfish but rather just the anenome itself. If I get an anenome does it need a clownfish or will it do a lot better with a clownfish?
The anenome does not need a clownfish.
 
Top Bottom