Is there something called over filtering?

IS there something called over filtering


  • Total voters
    8

Cory04

Member
I want to use a Seachem 35 filter on a 20 gallon high, is there something called over filtering?
 
Best Answer - View FishBoy101's answer

FishBoy101

Member
Yes, there is such thing is as over filtering, but you don't have over filtering. I'm planning on adding some more filters to go with my 75 gallon's filter. A 35 gallon's filter won't have much of an affect on a 20 gallon.

I voted yes because a 75 gallon filter on a 20 gallon isn't the best choice of filtration I feel.
 

Mudminnow

Member
Not to my knowledge, no. If your filter is bigger than you need, the beneficial bacteria colony in it just won't grow as big as it could have. I personally like to run oversized filters, just in case my bacteria colony would need to grow larger to handle more waste for some reason.
 
  • Thread Starter

Cory04

Member
FishBoy101 said:
Yes, there is such thing is as over filtering, but you don't have over filtering. I'm planning on adding some more filters to go with my 75 gallon's filter. A 35 gallon's filter won't have much of an affect on a 20 gallon.

I voted yes because a 75 gallon filter on a 20 gallon isn't the best choice of filtration I feel.
is it bad or good though? I didn't say a 75-gallon filter, I said a 35
 

FishBoy101

Member
I know, I just gave an example. Your situation is fine.
 

Mudminnow

Member
Although it may seem like it, I don't think FishBoy101 and I are in disagreement here. I think it has to do with what type of filtration we are talking about.

In my response, I was focusing on biological filtration. I don't think it's possible to overdue that, because beneficial bacteria colonies can only grow as large as the food available to them...no matter how big the filter.

If we are talking about chemical filtration, I could see how one could over filter. DI water for example is too clean on its own and will stress fish.

There are other things filters do besides just filter too. They provide flow. If your filter is providing too much flow for the inhabitants of the tank, then it could be said to be over filtered.
 

jinjerJOSH22

Member
Yes there is but it's more to do with how much flow there is rather than the size or amount of filtration. Some species of fish such as Gourami don't handle strong flow very well.
 
  • Thread Starter

Cory04

Member
Mudminnow said:
Although it may seem like it, I don't think FishBoy101 and I are in disagreement here. I think it has to do with what type of filtration we are talking about.

In my response, I was focusing on biological filtration. I don't think it's possible to overdue that, because beneficial bacteria colonies can only grow as large as the food available to them...no matter how big the filter.

If we are talking about chemical filtration, I could see how one could over filter. DI water for example is too clean on its own and will stress fish.

There are other things filters do besides just filter too. They provide flow. If your filter is providing too much flow for the inhabitants of the tank, then it could be said to be over filtered.
Im planning to add 1 betta, 6 panda corydoras, and 8 neon tetras or 6 dwarf red coral platyor 9 ember tetras. Is that enough "food"?
 

redmare

Member
Your situation sounds fine. I tend to filter one size up- I run the aquaclear 50 on my 30, and the aquaclear 30 on my 20. There's not really overfiltering, but you can filter far beyond your needs and it's just a waste, but that's not your issue.
 
  • Thread Starter

Cory04

Member
Mudminnow said:
Not to my knowledge, no. If your filter is bigger than you need, the beneficial bacteria colony in it just won't grow as big as it could have. I personally like to run oversized filters, just in case my bacteria colony would need to grow larger to handle more waste for some reason.
The more biological filtration the more bacteria.
 

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