Breeding Bronze Corydoras

CrackerboxPalace

Methylene blue is good for cory eggs in my experience. You should remove it soon before they hatch though, the fry might not tolerate it well once hatched. Egg tumblers are great too, but I'd use both.

Also just to clarify, if you want good chances at raising at least a couple of corys to adulthood, you should move the eggs to a hatchery tank. Not sure if you already planned on doing this but this is because corys tend to eat their eggs and sometimes fry.
 

Marlene327

I'd feed them a variety of foods, not just bloodworms. Regular fishfood, brine shrimp, shrimp pellets, algae wafers, sinking wafers.

I've never used the blue, but have added 1 or 2 catappa leaves. Fungus took out a small percentage, but I was left with a lot. The fry love hiding under the leaves. That's just my experience. When you see them laying eggs, get them out soon or they will eat every one!

And, I had a sponge filter on one end of the tank and a bubbler on the other for the eggs. I think the extra bubbles and movement is good for them. My 10 gallon tank had maybe 6 gallons in it.
 

Aquaticguy

Methylene blue is good for cory eggs in my experience. You should remove it soon before they hatch though, the fry might not tolerate it well once hatched. Egg tumblers are great too, but I'd use both.

Also just to clarify, if you want good chances at raising at least a couple of corys to adulthood, you should move the eggs to a hatchery tank. Not sure if you already planned on doing this but this is because corys tend to eat their eggs and sometimes fry.
I will separate them in a 5 gallon tank and I will add some fake plants for hiding spots since I am gonna use m blue.
I'd feed them a variety of foods, not just bloodworms. Regular fishfood, brine shrimp, shrimp pellets, algae wafers, sinking wafers.

I've never used the blue, but have added 1 or 2 catappa leaves. Fungus took out a small percentage, but I was left with a lot. The fry love hiding under the leaves. That's just my experience. When you see them laying eggs, get them out soon or they will eat every one!

And, I had a sponge filter on one end of the tank and a bubbler on the other for the eggs. I think the extra bubbles and movement is good for them. My 10 gallon tank had maybe 6 gallons in it.
I will use a HOB which IME was very good for the fry. There is also a sponge that I put in the hole so the Cory Frys won't get stuck. I failed while trying to hatch brine shrimp, idk why but the eggs won't hatch, or maybe I have to look even closer. I will feed bloodworms when the fry grow up but while they are young I will feed them crushed tetra min flakes or other stuff.

Edit: I will also get algae wafers in the future.
 

Ouse

I will feed blood worms.
I wouldn’t recommend so.

Instead, feed the babies lighter frozen/live foods in place of the bloodworms. Bloodworms should make up a tiny part of a fish’s diet if they’re to be included in the diet at all.
I think M. Blue would work to prevent fungus.
Basic husbandry will work to prevent fungus. ;)
I'd feed them a variety of foods, […] algae wafers
I will also get algae wafers in the future.
Cories can’t actually digest algae; they’re carnivores. Only when they’re absolutely starving and/or opportunistic would they pursue it as food.

... also, here is a trick you could try OP: use collected rainwater to top-up the water column during water changes. It can encourage breeding in fish as it replicates conditions typical of the wet season. Only do this if you’re sure your roof doesn’t include a layer of asphalt, however.
 

Flyfisha

Getting eggs from the adults on a regular basis is only the beginning of raising healthy corydoras.
It’s possible to get multiple batches of eggs every few days. Approximately 20 eggs every 10 minutes for 2 hours every 3 days from 6 corydoras.

I have found micro worms to be one of the helpful foods for fry because they sink down to the bottom of the container the fry are being raised in . Micro worms stay alive in water for only a few hours at most.

I would suggest a bare bottom in the fry raising container to help you remove uneaten food as you feed 4 times a day.

At least in the first few weeks hang on front breeding boxes have worked for me with the air driven lift tubes providing constant water from the main tank.

Good luck Aquaticguy
 

Marlene327

Getting eggs from the adults on a regular basis is only the beginning of raising healthy corydoras.
It’s possible to get multiple batches of eggs every few days. Approximately 20 eggs every 10 minutes for 2 hours every 3 days from 6 corydoras.

I have found micro worms to be one of the helpful foods for fry because they sink down to the bottom of the container the fry are being raised in . Micro worms stay alive in water for only a few hours at most.

I would suggest a bare bottom in the fry raising container to help you remove uneaten food as you feed 4 times a day.

At least in the first few weeks hang on front breeding boxes have worked for me with the air driven lift tubes providing constant water from the main tank.

Good luck Aquaticguy
I never tried micro worms, that's interesting! I use a turkey baster to feed them, mix a little First Bites with water in a small cup, suck it out, than can drop it low so it doesn't float. After a week I'm adding frozen baby brine shrimp the same way. I also use the baster on the bare bottom to clean up. I think it's a useful tool, use it more in the tank room than the kitchen! (Of course I use different ones, for anyone who gasped! LOL)
I wouldn’t recommend so.

Instead, feed the babies lighter frozen/live foods in place of the bloodworms. Bloodworms should make up a tiny part of a fish’s diet if they’re to be included in the diet at all.

Basic husbandry will work to prevent fungus. ;)


Cories can’t actually digest algae; they’re carnivores. Only when they’re absolutely starving and/or opportunistic would they pursue it as food.

... also, here is a trick you could try: use collected rainwater to top-up the water column during water changes. It can encourage breeding in fish as it replicates conditions typical of the wet season. Only do this if you’re sure your roof doesn’t include a layer of asphalt, however.
I didn't know they have a problem digesting algae wafers. I have 17 adults in my community tank and they're very well fed, but go crazy chasing them down, same with shrimp pellets. I'm actually putting them in for the mystery snails more than the cories, but honestly the snails never make it in time. Once a week I remove my snails into a container of their water and they get fed a few hours and returned. They do go nuts for the algae wafers or zucchini, it goes away quickly.

One thing about algae wafers I had to learn the hard way in the beginning, do NOT put a lot in the tank at once. If you're using the larger ones, break them into as many pieces as possible and add small pieces - of course it depends on how many are being fed, how much goes in. The mini ones can be broken 4 ways. If you add too many, you'll soon have VERY stinky water!
 

Aquaticguy

... also, here is a trick you could try OP: use collected rainwater to top-up the water column during water changes. It can encourage breeding in fish as it replicates conditions typical of the wet season. Only do this if you’re sure your roof doesn’t include a layer of asphalt, however.
Isn't the rain water kinda acidic and do I have to turn off my heater so the water does not heat up again. But slight problem, Its near winter here and its like 16 celsius day time so the water may get pretty cold for the guppies.
 

Flyfisha

Yes Aquaticguy as Ouse wrote rain water has very different parameters to most peoples tap water. That is kind of the point. We are trying to trigger a response from fish. I have used some cold rain water on OTHER species. I would not recommend it if you have more than one species in a community tank. And I am not prepared to tell anyone just how cold the water was for fear of killing another persons fish. You can make your own decisions. I have used cold water trying to trigger fish. You may not need to do that with corydoras. Most likely not with bronze cories? They will spawn anyway?

edit .
The heater remains in the tank and yes it will bring the cold water back up to tropical fish temperature.
( be careful if you do this )
 

Aquaticguy

Yes Aquaticguy as Ouse wrote rain water has very different parameters to most peoples tap water. That is kind of the point. We are trying to trigger a response from fish. I have used some cold rain water on OTHER species. I would not recommend it if you have more than one species in a community tank. And I am not prepared to tell anyone just how cold the water was for fear of killing another persons fish. You can make your own decisions. I have used cold water trying to trigger fish. You may not need to do that with corydoras. Most likely not with bronze cories? They will spawn anyway?

edit .
The heater remains in the tank and yes it will bring the cold water back up to tropical fish temperature.
( be careful if you do this )
So how would I exactly make the corys breed?? Do I have to add tannin, or maybe do something to change the water? I don't think I will use rain water since its very cold and also I live in a city so the water can have some toxins in the rainwater. Though I heard people do a water change with slight cooler water to encourage them. I can't change my heaters temp, its always at 26c so usually its 26c. Would it hurt if I did a water change with 24c? Though if I turn off the heater, the water will be like 10c by morning so I don't know what to do.
 

Flyfisha

Do not turn the heater off. Definitely do not turn the heater off.

What we are replication is just a shower of rain in a tropical country ( The Amazon river ) Very quickly after the rain the sun comes out and the air temperature is warmer than before the rain. The water in the Amazon basin soon gets back up to temperature.

As mentioned before corydoras ( particularly bronze) will lay eggs very often. Everyone eats them 10 seconds later, including mum. You need to be there in the morning and remove the eggs as they are placed on the glass / a leaf. A finger nail or razor blade is often recommended.

Good food like live white worms and grindle worms
Good water- clean fresh water.
Are the first things needed.
 

Aquaticguy

Aight so I just added a breeding mop DIY which is made of yarn for the corydoras to lay eggs. When I added the mop, after 10 minutes, the corydoras were swimming around it, and on top of it. One actually went inside which shocked me of how good it was. I feed them Vibra bites. If the fry are born, should I just feed them brine shrimp eggs. I failed hatching them, they just won't hatch. And I am not looking towards buying a hatchery just for brine shrimp so I think ill just feed them the eggs or some thing else. Not egg yolk cause its too messy, and hard to clean up.
 

Flyfisha

More research Aquaticguy.

No you definitely can not feed unhatched brine shrimp eggs. To get them to hatch as long as they are not very old stock you need salt water. No conditioner is needed or recommended just salt. About 3 teaspoons per 1-5 litres is required.

Have you researched the Tee position the male and female do before she lays eggs?

Some fry MAY survive on what ever old
food is in the tank under old ornaments etc that the adults can’t reach. Brine shrimp are not ideal because they swim at the surface. Corydoras fry will eat dry fish food dust .
 

Aquaticguy

More research Aquaticguy.

No you definitely can not feed unhatched brine shrimp eggs. To get them to hatch as long as they are not very old stock you need salt water. No conditioner is needed or recommended just salt. About 3 teaspoons per 1-5 litres is required.

Have you researched the Tee position the male and female do before she lays eggs?

Some fry MAY survive on what ever old
food is in the tank under old ornaments etc that the adults can’t reach. Brine shrimp are not ideal because they swim at the surface. Corydoras fry will eat dry fish food dust .
The t pose, oh yeah. That happens when they breed as far as I know. Some people say feed brine shrimp to Corydoras fry, would crushed up, then mixed in a container tetra min flakes be okay? I researched about feeding flakes to Corydoras fry, most say its fine, but some say micro worms. Though I can't get micro worms rn so I think ill stick with the flakes, or maybe some fry food.

Here is a link to the info: Which Is The Best Corydoras Fry Food.
 

DoubleDutch

Getting eggs from the adults on a regular basis is only the beginning of raising healthy corydoras.
It’s possible to get multiple batches of eggs every few days. Approximately 20 eggs every 10 minutes for 2 hours every 3 days from 6 corydoras.

I have found micro worms to be one of the helpful foods for fry because they sink down to the bottom of the container the fry are being raised in . Micro worms stay alive in water for only a few hours at most.

I would suggest a bare bottom in the fry raising container to help you remove uneaten food as you feed 4 times a day.

At least in the first few weeks hang on front breeding boxes have worked for me with the air driven lift tubes providing constant water from the main tank.

Good luck Aquaticguy
very thin layer of sand
 

Coradee

Hi, if you can’t get microworms or similar then baby brine shrimp is good but not the eggs unless they’re decapsulated.
Tbh any good catfish pellet crushed to a very fine powder will do the job, make sure it’s one for more carnivorous catfish not algae based.
I’ve used Hikari first bites, tetra tabi min & Vitalis catfish pellets in the past.

I’d also agree with DoubleDutch in using a thin layer of sand for fry, they’re quite susceptible to bacterial infections often caused by a build up of biofilm on the bottom & you’ll be quite surprised once they’ve absorbed their egg sac how quickly they start sifting through the sand for food.
 

Flyfisha

Breeding any species of fish takes time and research Aquaticguy. All I can suggest is there is no correct way of doing things and you make your own decisions based on your own experiences .

Thanks for the suggestion DoubleDutch on using a thin layer of sand for a corydoras fry grow out tank. You raise a valid point, I would still say bare bottom for the first 6 weeks of growth. Especially when feeding heavily in a hang on front breeding box.
I have read many times of other people suggesting glass bottom rivers do not appear in nature and are not common in river beds. Whatever the floor the area should be cleaned often, although it is my experience that corydoras can sometimes raise themselves in a community tank with no cleaning or special treatment including special fry feeding.

Aquaticguy as you work your way though “ Marks” videos as posted above on raising corydoras you may wish to view some from my local club member?

 

Aquaticguy

First I need them to breed lol. I will probably feed them some high quality sinking flakes or maybe some tabs like fun tips. Oh and I don't want to really use sand for the fry. I would say its a good idea, but it would be hard to clean up. But I would add sand when they are a few weeks old like FlyFisha said. I am very excited about having Cory fry sorry for all the questions, just trying to make sure I get peoples experience to think about.
 

Marlene327

First I need them to breed lol. I will probably feed them some high quality sinking flakes or maybe some tabs like fun tips. Oh and I don't want to really use sand for the fry. I would say its a good idea, but it would be hard to clean up. But I would add sand when they are a few weeks old like FlyFisha said. I am very excited about having Cory fry sorry for all the questions, just trying to make sure I get peoples experience to think about.
Mine have surprised me with young ones I didn't see til they were probably 4-6 weeks old. 1 or 2 at a time. I know you want a lot, which is a whole 'nother thing and I've done that too. But worrying about what to feed them, as we all do, turns out to be a mute point, they managed to thrive in the plants eating what they could find - it shows how hardy they are! But yes, in a bare bottom tank, they rely on you only. Fish of all kinds do best with a variety of foods. Give them 2 or 3 different things a day, switch it up, and they'll be happy and healthy and will get busy! 2 males and a female seems to work best for me.
 

Aquaticguy

Mine have surprised me with young ones I didn't see til they were probably 4-6 weeks old. 1 or 2 at a time. I know you want a lot, which is a whole 'nother thing and I've done that too. But worrying about what to feed them, as we all do, turns out to be a mute point, they managed to thrive in the plants eating what they could find - it shows how hardy they are! But yes, in a bare bottom tank, they rely on you only. Fish of all kinds do best with a variety of foods. Give them 2 or 3 different things a day, switch it up, and they'll be happy and healthy and will get busy! 2 males and a female seems to work best for me.
I may add round gravel not everywhere but in one place for them to hang out. Though is there any way to activate them to breed? For me I am just waiting with the mop in the tank I will take it out again today but the corydoras hang out near it. Should I just wait for them to breed eventually?

Edit: I will check every 1-2 days if they laid eggs. The tank is a 16 gallon though I will upgrade in the future but for now they're happy.
 

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