Help Zoanthus Polyp

manning7987

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Hello I bought a zoanthus polyp a few days ago and it will not open up any help would be appreciated thank you.
 

stella1979

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Hi :) I have never acclimated corals to water parameters, only to temp by floating their bags, then dipped and inspected for unwanted invaders, rinsed in tank water, and finally, in the tank they went.

People's experiences will be different. Mine, with zoas, was not great in the beginning. Quite a few varieties were introduced in the first year but none of them ultimately survived, (meanwhile, other corals were very happy indeed). By year 2 with our reef tank, I'd given up on zoas but a friend kindly sent me some and what do you know... they thrived. So, for me, zoanthids did not like my young tank even though many LPS corals did well, as did a few SPS. Strange, since they say softies are easier in the hands of the less experienced, but that was not my experience at all. Anyhow, zoas have done well for me ever since and because so many 'harder' corals did well for me in the early days, while zoas did not, I can only assume that what I needed to offer zoas was a mature tank... and all I had to do was wait a looong time.:rolleyes:

So, really, the best advice I can offer is patience and stability. Keep water parameters, flow, and lighting stable and do not move the zoas nor touch them. Allow them to become used to their new environment without interference and hopefully, they'll get happy over the coming days.
 

Magicpenny75

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Sometimes they will pout for a couple of days. If they don't open in a few days, make sure you have them in the correct light, not too much flow (as a generality they aren't big fans of being blown around), and give it some time. Not all zoas like the same amount of light either, so you'll have to research the particular one you bought. The store should be able to help you with it. If the light level is right, try moving them to a spot with a little less flow. And then wait a day or so. @stella1979 is absolutely right about not messing with them too much, but don't wait until they start to melt away to take action. And remember they will always sulk for a number of hours after they are touched or moved.

(edited after reading Stella's post)
 

stella1979

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@Magicpenny75 is totally right. I often feel that some of the best advice I can offer new reefers is to not mess with brand new corals, lol. It's true but it's also true that you don't want to sit on your hands and watch them melt. It's also very true that different zoa varieties will have their own light requirements, as in, some do very well under very high light indeed, while others will do just fine lower in a tank. If you can research your specific variety then I'd highly suggest you do so.

So, I suppose the best advice I can offer is to leave them be as much as is possible and if you think a different spot can make them happier by providing better lighting or flow, go ahead and move them. Then... don't touch them.;)
 

livinstond

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@Magicpenny75 and @stella1979 have it exactly right. Hopefully they just need to adjust, and are in the right tank position

The hardest thing about Reefing... that thin line between being patience and not messing with to much at once
 




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