How Do I Zoanthids

T'sTropicalTanks

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Is keeping zoas on the frag base it came on from the lfs make it more difficult to spread onto the hardscape, like will it leave the base eventually? I purchased a colony with roughly 12 polyps on it it’s been since January and it’s yet to colonize enough to leave the frag base
IMG_2465.jpg


I currently feed reef roids once a week both broadcast and target
 

stella1979

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Hi There's a forum issue going on atm (which is being addressed) and we cannot see your pictures for the time being. So, I will have to go on what I know...

Yes, zoas should eventually spread beyond the frag plug. In fact, I've seen this exact thing many times yet, I would still say it's easier for them to spread beyond if there is not a large drop or gap between the plug and the rock. This, is likely obvious, lol, so moving on...

You say they were purchased with a dozen polyps and haven't yet colonized beyond the plug but without a viewable pic, I cannot see if they have grown at all from the time of purchase. Have they produced any new polyps? Are they generally happy, (meaning, do they open nicely most of the time)?

How old is the tank? Are other corals thriving? If so, are those other corals softies? I'm sorry for all the questions... just, the more we know, the more we can help.
 
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T'sTropicalTanks

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Hi There's a forum issue going on atm (which is being addressed) and we cannot see your pictures for the time being. So, I will have to go on what I know...

Yes, zoas should eventually spread beyond the frag plug. In fact, I've seen this exact thing many times yet, I would still say it's easier for them to spread beyond if there is not a large drop or gap between the plug and the rock. This, is likely obvious, lol, so moving on...

You say they were purchased with a dozen polyps and haven't yet colonized beyond the plug but without a viewable pic, I cannot see if they have grown at all from the time of purchase. Have they produced any new polyps? Are they generally happy, (meaning, do they open nicely most of the time)?

How old is the tank? Are other corals thriving? If so, are those other corals softies? I'm sorry for all the questions... just, the more we know, the more we can help.
They’ve doubled in polyps since, I have gsp and Kenya tree that aren’t growing . The zoas open every day
 

stella1979

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Well then, it sounds like your zoas are very happy indeed, and that's great. I've never had a Kenya tree though I feel ya with the stagnant GSP. I hardly know what to say about it because there's tons of advice out there to take care with GSP since it can grow so fast that it may just take over a tank. Yet, mine did not grow at all, often went moody, (meaning, it would close up tight for no discernable reason, and stay that way for days or weeks.) Lots and lots of other corals did well under my care so I couldn't explain the GSP's unhappiness.... and then, when it hadn't opened for about two months and other corals were thriving all around it... well, I gave up on GSP, didn't want the aggravation, so removed it from my tank for good.

I've seen similar experiences to my own and I've seen the exact opposite as well. I've also seen slight variations in the looks of GSP. So, could it be that some varieties do better in captivity than others? I tend to think so.

The fact that your zoas are growing shows that you are providing what's needed for them to thrive. So, could it also be that soft corals just aren't as easy-care as they are often said to be? I think so. Softies are in fact the only corals to have given me trouble. In the early days, zoas plagued me with troubles, GSP did not do well, and Xenia did just fine though it started spreading too much for my liking. By this time I'd learned that, at least for me, lots of LPS corals are quite hardy and forgiving of mistakes a new reefer can make. First corals for me included the softies mentioned above, as well as favias, favites, euphyllia, and by far my very favorite beginner's coral, a Duncan. If you're looking for a gorgeous, hardy coral, that is also a fast grower and fun to feed... get yourself a Duncan.

Also, on a personal note, I do not like the look of frag plugs on my rockscape and do not have the patience to wait for a coral to grow enough to hide the ugly unnatural looking plugs. So, for every coral I have (except for a few frags, on plugs, and on a frag rack instead of the scape), I have carefully removed them from plugs before attaching them to my rock. If this is your desire, I'm happy to help however I can.
 
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T'sTropicalTanks

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Well then, it sounds like your zoas are very happy indeed, and that's great. I've never had a Kenya tree though I feel ya with the stagnant GSP. I hardly know what to say about it because there's tons of advice out there to take care with GSP since it can grow so fast that it may just take over a tank. Yet, mine did not grow at all, often went moody, (meaning, it would close up tight for no discernable reason, and stay that way for days or weeks.) Lots and lots of other corals did well under my care so I couldn't explain the GSP's unhappiness.... and then, when it hadn't opened for about two months and other corals were thriving all around it... well, I gave up on GSP, didn't want the aggravation, so removed it from my tank for good.

I've seen similar experiences to my own and I've seen the exact opposite as well. I've also seen slight variations in the looks of GSP. So, could it be that some varieties do better in captivity than others? I tend to think so.

The fact that your zoas are growing shows that you are providing what's needed for them to thrive. So, could it also be that soft corals just aren't as easy-care as they are often said to be? I think so. Softies are in fact the only corals to have given me trouble. In the early days, zoas plagued me with troubles, GSP did not do well, and Xenia did just fine though it started spreading too much for my liking. By this time I'd learned that, at least for me, lots of LPS corals are quite hardy and forgiving of mistakes a new reefer can make. First corals for me included the softies mentioned above, as well as favias, favites, euphyllia, and by far my very favorite beginner's coral, a Duncan. If you're looking for a gorgeous, hardy coral, that is also a fast grower and fun to feed... get yourself a Duncan.

Also, on a personal note, I do not like the look of frag plugs on my rockscape and do not have the patience to wait for a coral to grow enough to hide the ugly unnatural looking plugs. So, for every coral I have (except for a few frags, on plugs, and on a frag rack instead of the scape), I have carefully removed them from plugs before attaching them to my rock. If this is your desire, I'm happy to help however I can.
Thanks, I am now considering removing my zoas and Kenya tree from the plug, I’m planning on starting a new thread for this on how to do it
 
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