Zoanthids And Button Polyps - Safe?

Discussion in 'Zoanthids and Button Polyps' started by Cyclone@303, Feb 5, 2018.

  1. Cyclone@303

    Cyclone@303New MemberMember

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    I am just adding my first corals to my 90 gallon tank. I have been researching corals and these guys show up all over the place (as I'm sure you all know). Of course I am also reading about all the "dangers" associated with them (potentially). I wanted to get some advice/thoughts from the forum.

    First, I have also read plenty about using proper precautions including: wearing gloves and eye protection, not boiling or pouring hot water over live rock with these on them, etc. Are these really a concern or is the risk low (unless you don't watch what you are doing)?

    Second, when looking at these on line many of the descriptions talk about how they can take over a tank if you are not careful. They are very beautiful corals and obviously a nice addition to a tank. Is the maintenance/keeping these under control that much of an issue? How do you keep them in check and does that increase the issues with the toxins?

    Finally, any suggestions for specific ones to look at?

    As always thanks for the help!
     
  2. Lorekeeper

    LorekeeperWell Known MemberMember

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    If you're fragging the corals, gloves and eye protection should be used for a precaution. Just handling them shouldn't be an issue, though. And why would you pour hot or boiling water over your corals and live rock?!

    Zoas aren't all that invasive. As long as you keep them cut back and don't let them go rampant, you won't have any issues. In order to frag them, most people take them out of the tank, slice off the polyps they need, rinse in old tank water (or at least I do), and then add them back into the tank. They should open up within a day or two.

    Eagle eye, fire and ice, and your average green ones are my personal favorites.
     
  3. OP
    OP
    Cyclone@303

    Cyclone@303New MemberMember

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    The pouring hot water (or boiling) came from people trying to clean rock that they got. The hot water created a steam that caused problems when they inhaled it. Sorry, but two other questions. First, how do you cut them back (scissors?). Second, I have basically one large section of rock that runs the length of the tank. Would it be best to create some separate islands for them?

    And thanks for the quick response to my post!
     
  4. Lorekeeper

    LorekeeperWell Known MemberMember

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    I used a box cutter. As long as you get the majority of the fleshy bit underneath the stalk, they can be glued to a frag plug and be regrown.

    As far as the separate islands thing, they won't grow fast enough for you to worry about that. I'm not sure who thinks zoas are invasive, but the majority of the ones you'll encounter in the hobby aren't at all.
     
  5. stella1979

    stella1979ModeratorModerator Member

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    So, zoa's, button polyps and paly's are are part of the palythoa family, but some are more or less toxic/invasive. For example, I've heard that Palythoa Grandis, (which I have;) ), are known to be quite toxic, while some designer zoas may not be at all. Either way, always take precautions with anything in the palythoa family.

    As far as taking over the real estate, you certainly don't have to worry about that with most zoas, especially the pretty ones. There are the wilder types that may grow a bit faster, but I've never heard of zoas being a nuisance. Paly's may be a different story, particularly green, yellow or brown ones, as they can grow quickly enough to become a nuisance. It's not always easy to tell if you're looking at paly's or zoa's, but I'm pretty sure most of the colorful polyps you see in the LFS are zoas. The green, yellow and brown paly's mentioned previously are larger than zoas, have a longer skirt and stem, and just aren't as pretty. @grantm91 can tell you about some invasive paly's. ;)
     
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