Would this light work?

Clarissa98

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I'm planning on upgrading my 10g lighting to actually grow plants. The plants I have haven't spread since July. And I only have anubias and an amazon sword plus some baby mystery plant which has grown more or spread. So would this fixture help with that and what plants would I be able to grow with this. I do have liquid ferts and root tabs but I will buy Excel if the light is too high for low tech. Help please
 
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Clarissa98

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Do you know the name or the link to it. Also I'll take other recommendations that are available on amazon but nothing more than $30-40 since it's just a 10g and the hood I have on it right now cost me about $33
 

MikeRad89

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Yes. Plants use 6000-7000 kelvins for photosynthesis. The full spectrum 10k light is basically bombarding plants with mostly unusable light. They'd survive, but wouldn't thrive
 
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Clarissa98

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Ah I see now ok. Still browsing amazon lol

Ok so I've set aside the LED option and deciding to choose the cheaper route with fluorescents. What bulbs should I be looking for to fit the aqueon fluorescent hood.
 

MikeRad89

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That beamswork is a steal at that price, I have one myself. Grows plants very well.

The hood is going to end up being way more expensive. You'd need a T5 bulb with the same kelvin rating 6-7k
 
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Clarissa98

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Ahh ok. So I would have to buy a glass top too? Or do I need a top with the beamsworth. And do you have the 10000k version or the 6500k

Didn't see the link before oops! That is way cheaper. So for my 20 inch tank should I get the 18 in or the 24 in?
 

MikeRad89

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I believe the 18 fits. The brackets stick out an inch on either side. I have the 6500k
 

Aqua Hero

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I thought that 10000k vs 6700k myth was busted long time ago. Kelvin is just the color temperature it's doesn't. The plants don't give a . I grew successful plants in 10000k, 6500k and a mix. I switched from 10000k to 6700k not because of growth but because I wanted led lights instead of t5ho bulbs for the shimmer effect and that 10000k make the colors look washed out.

Par readings are you should be more concerned about. That is what effects plant growth NOT kelvin
 
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Clarissa98

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Ok I've settled on the light. After reading the different info from you guys about the spectrum etc, I ordered the beamswork 18. Mike do you have a glass top on your tank with these fixtures?
 

MikeRad89

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Aqua Hero said:
I thought that 10000k vs 6700k myth was busted long time ago. Kelvin is just the color temperature it's doesn't. The plants don't give a . I grew successful plants in 10000k, 6500k and a mix. I switched from 10000k to 6700k not because of growth but because I wanted led lights instead of t5ho bulbs for the shimmer effect and that 10000k make the colors look washed out.

Par readings are you should be more concerned about. That is what effects plant growth NOT kelvin
It's not a myth. A 10k light will grow plants, but you're dumping way more blue light into the tank than is necessary.

During autumn you'll see the leaves of deciduous trees change color because of the availability of the wavelengths available. Less usable light via shorter days causes chlorophyll to die off and the different pigments to take over the leaf.

A 10k bulb looks nice, but is a waste scientifically. A 2-3k bulb is yellow light, which is virtually unusable for aquatic plants (and most terrestrial ones).

Plants have evolved to use the light from the sun, obviously. The sun has an effective rating of 5700k and 6700k.
 

Aqua Hero

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From what I have heard from all the other planted tank forums such as aquascspe world, Ukaps, planted tank forum and Tom Barr they all said that the kelvin temperature doesn't matter but instead the par reading are what you should be more concerned.

I tested it myself for 6 months and saw NO DIFFERENCE in growth. I mixed 6700k with 10000k, had full 10000k and full 6700k. The plants grew the same.

So example to me how everyone in the planted tank based forums and my own personal experiment pointing to the fact that kelvin doesn't matter, is not true?
 

MikeRad89

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Let me put it this way. Nothing less than 6000k will grow plants well. Anything above that will grow them. 6500k is middle of the road what plants use. 10k includes those wavelengths with more blues at the higher range. Those blues go unused.

With that said, if you have a 6500k light with low intensity and poor water penetration and a 10k light with high intensity and great water penetration the plants will grow better under the 10k. That's not to say the kelvin rating, by your own admission, is giving the plants any advantage.

We're getting off topic here....back to the OP. If you want to start a thread in the lighting section we can discuss it there and see what the consensus is.
 
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Clarissa98

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Sooooo mike. Would a diy glass top work with these lights? I was thinking maybe Home Depot to cut a glass top. I watched a couple vids of people making sliding glass tops which seems fairly simple. Just glass, a handle, and some corner molding.

Oh and more importantly though. What is this going to rate my tank as? Low light, medium/moderate, or high. I don't really have the money/time right now to figure out a whole co2 system. I can buy some Excel and start dosing with that if needed. I think I read that the higher your light the more you need to supplement nutrients. Would this be true with low tech plants (val, anubias, java ferns,) as well.
 

christopherdiehl77

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The diy glass top would definitely work with this light although you dont have to use a glass top. The top helps with fish that like to jump out and cuts down on evaporation but if the light you are looking at purchasing isnt water proof then i would recommend glass top. I believe that with this light you still will be at low light. I could be wrong though
 
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Clarissa98

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That's what I was guessing since it's at the lower end of the range. Ill wait for others to chime in if I need to dose extra nutrients/carbon
 

MikeRad89

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I'd put it under medium light. Dosing carbon and liquid ferts would be beneficial.

The vallisneria is known to melt with excel. To prevent that, you want ignore the directions on the bottle. Dose 1mL per day for one week, gradually move up to the recommended daily dose so they can become accustomed to it.
 
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