Would these rocks be aquarium safe?

JasperBetta

AggressiveAquatics

Looks fine to me, they just look like river stones.
 
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StarGirl

I dont see why not, someone said they put them in their aquarium on one of the reviews. They sound like they are small.
 
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Catappa

I used to have a list of tests to do on rocks to find out if they contained iron, calcium, etc. but can't find it right now. It's always a good idea to test, unless you are buying rocks from a trusted aquarium source, sold specifically for the aquarium. If no one else responds with the testing info, I'll see if I can find it.

Edited to add: I'm too lazy to hunt in my bookcase, so I googled. This is the best article I could find, very comprehensive: How to Use Rocks From Nature for Your Fish Tank – Connecting The Mind
 
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Kalaaidit

Hey! Do you think these are aquarium safe? They were sold in a local aquarium store. They said they could raise the hardness of water if you put plenty in your aquarium.
 
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Catappa

I suspected they would contain calcium carbonate and I was right. Here's an article (lower down, they explain how it increases the hardness of your aquarium water). Take your fishes' ph needs into consideration. Seiryu Stone for Aquariums: Everything You Should Know
 
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carsonsgjs

Use something acidic to see if it fizzes - if it does then the rock isnt inert and will alter your water parameters. I personally use bottle 1 from the api nitrate test as it contains hydrochloric acid. Vinegar can also work but is weaker.
 
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Kalaaidit

I suspected they would contain calcium carbonate and I was right. Here's an article (lower down, they explain how it increases the hardness of your aquarium water). Take your fishes' ph needs into consideration. Seiryu Stone for Aquariums: Everything You Should Know
I’ve read that article but it also says the rocks commonly sold as seiryi stone are actually some other stone. I guess I’ll test it with some acid. The tab water where I live is already 8.0 pH so I have to use agents anyway to lower it to a 6.5 so I guess these rocks don’t make that big of a difference when I already have to lower the pH somehow as long as I make sure the water values are optimal for my fish. So I can use these rocks as long as the ph, kh and gh are optimal for my fish, right?
 
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carsonsgjs

I’ve read that article but it also says the rocks commonly sold as seiryi stone are actually some other stone. I guess I’ll test it with some acid. The tab water where I live is already 8.0 pH so I have to use agents anyway to lower it to a 6.5 so I guess these rocks don’t make that big of a difference when I already have to lower the pH somehow as long as I make sure the water values are optimal for my fish. So I can use these rocks as long as the ph, kh and gh are optimal for my fish, right?
It depends on what fish you keep but i personally dont see the point in changing your ph from 8 to 6.5, only to then add something to your tank that will then increase it again. Dont get me wrong, adding the rock wont instantly change your parameters the moment it touches the water but it will happen gradually over time.
 
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Catappa

I agree with Caronsgjs' post.
 
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Kalaaidit

It depends on what fish you keep but i personally dont see the point in changing your ph from 8 to 6.5, only to then add something to your tank that will then increase it again. Dont get me wrong, adding the rock wont instantly change your parameters the moment it touches the water but it will happen gradually over time.
All the fish I have prefer lightly acidic water between 6-7 pH. I have read that too high and too low pH shorten the lifespan of fish. All my fish are also from peaty water, so I have been using peat acid extracts which have really boosted their activity and colors. I’d like a black aquascape inside my aquarium but have yet to find beautiful black rocks that would be inert. Of course if you can recommend a particular kind of stone I’ll take that into consideration. Thank you for your answers and I agree adding pH- to the water with stones that raise pH is a little waste of money and products but my aquarium isn’t only supposed to be a place to keep my pets but also a beautiful peace of decoration and therefore I’d like to know if it’s impossible to hold those rock in the aquarium or not or if there are another kind of inert rocks that could serve the purpose. Lava stone is another kind of rock I’ve considered but my local stores don’t have the shapes or sizes I want and to be honest ordering them online is way too expensive and when ordering most places don’t allow you to see the specific rock you’ll get before it arrives at your home. I live in Finland so the shipping from USA for example is already +10$. Therefore the problem I have is that I’m unable to get the kind that would be perfect so if I want the aquarium to look perfect, I need to use agents to please both me and fish. Beauty is pain isn’t it
 
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carsonsgjs

I think you would be ok with black lava rock as far as i know, if you can get hold of it. Completely agree with buying decorative stuff online though - you need to know what you are buying first if you are after a specific look.
 
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Jamesyb1989

Hey everyone.
I seen these stones in my local hardware store and love the look of them. Would they be ok to use in my tank? would they be safe for fish? I presume they would but wanna make sure before i got them
 
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DoubleDutch

To me those should be okay as long as you don't have bottomdwellers like Corys etc...
 
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Jamesyb1989

Only bottom dwellers i have are clown loachs. But they are big boys :D Id imagine they would be fine with this?
 
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MacZ

It should be safe, but as a substrate even big clown loaches do better with sand.

I have another thing to comment: You should be able to get buckets of that stuff from a nearby creek or gravel pit for free. It's astounding how much some companies want for that, when it's easier and cheaper to get it elsewhere.
 
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ruud

They look like typical river stones found all over Europe...and in my tanks. Perfectly safe! Very round-shaped, no sharp edges or holes. Doesn't affect water parameters. Totally cory-safe in my opinion. But I would combine this with sandy substrate. Say 80% sand, 20% stones. For the looks and for your fishes.
 
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Jamesyb1989

Great. Thanks everyone for the info
 
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DoubleDutch

They look like typical river stones found all over Europe...and in my tanks. Perfectly safe! Very round-shaped, no sharp edges or holes. Doesn't affect water parameters. Totally cory-safe in my opinion. But I would combine this with sandy substrate. Say 80% sand, 20% stones. For the looks and for your fishes.
Disagree them to be Cory-safe.
As stated elsewhere the are rounded / smooth but the size / shape cause food to get out of reach (depending on the thickness of the layer) and decay in the substrate.
There are more Cory- issues with this gravel than any other (even "sharp").

I don't have a sandfetish as it comes to Corys (kept mine on smaller gravel as well) but experiences on several forums have shown.
 
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ruud

Perhaps I've mistaken the application of the stones. If you only use these stones as substrate, applying several layers, no doubt the food will get through and out of reach for just about any fish. Also seems like a pain having to clean the substrate in order to remove excessive waste. But I was thinking more of a setup as in the image below. It consists mostly of sand, with stones partly buried in it.
 
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MacZ

Something I have to add about big clown loaches and pebbles: They can move those with ease. And that could mean they whack them against the glass. Just as a thought. I'd be a bit wary.
 
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ruud

I never keep fish larger than 1 inch ;)
 
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MacZ

To me 10cm is the maximum nowerdays, back in the day 20cm would be the most.
In this instance I just have experience with those loaches due to sometimes looking after my neighbour's tanks. He kept clown loaches between 15 and 25cm until late last year.
 
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DoubleDutch

Perhaps I've mistaken the application of the stones. If you only use these stones as substrate, applying several layers, no doubt the food will get through and out of reach for just about any fish. Also seems like a pain having to clean the substrate in order to remove excessive waste. But I was thinking more of a setup as in the image below. It consists mostly of sand, with stones partly buried in it.
Yeah but the Corys are the ones to encounter the pollution / bacterial pockets first.
 
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PAcanis

I just saw those river pebbles on Amazon while looking at substrates. $31 for 20lbs delivered with Prime.
I see a youtuber using that gravel a lot, but only as a transition from a rock hardscape into a sand "beach" area, like mentioned above.

I think that's a great look. And also helps diffuse the sand's brightness for the fish who don't like bright substrate.
 
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PAcanis

That's theft.

That seems pretty standard here for aquarium branded packages of substrate. They are all over priced IMO.
But I don't know how it compares to the gravel the OP posted. He did not list a price.
 
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Revan

I'd be careful when getting any rock or substrate in a tank, as it can hurt bottom dwellers if you don't get a soft edge one. I was thinking of getting some kohl loaches for my tank, and got really hyped for them, until I realized that my substrate was too harsh for them. I probably could cap it with sand or smooth gravel as others suggest, but I'm lazy lol ; )
 
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