Worst Tank Size/shape To Stock?

  1. Books&Fish Well Known Member Member

    What tank size or shape have you tried stocking and felt it was the most frustrating?

    I have two 10s, a 40 breeder, and a 75 that are all great. My 20 high (24 x 12 x 16) is a pain. It's too short to have fish happily swimming, too big for just a betta or shrimp colony. I feel guilty putting anything in it, really.

    In my 75g I have school of various fish that are 2" or less (except my dojos who will eventually reach 6"). In my 40 breeder I have just guppies. I plan to allow breeding to fill the tank nice. In my two 10s, one is a betta with snails and the other is an RCS colony and fry tank. Everyone in their respective tanks has plenty of swimming space, even more than the "8 inches x length of fish" rule of thumb.

    I hate the 20 high tank. I wish I didn't get it. I listed it for sale, but decided to keep it for quarantine or a small school of rasboras, or cherry barbs, or neon/cardinal tetras. But what schooling fish will really be happy and display natural behaviors in 24" of space? (Any ideas appreciated ;))
     
  2. tyguy7760 Fishlore VIP Member

    Anything high and narrow like a hex tank. Lots of gallons but small footprint.

    I personally loathe 55-65 gallon tanks. They sound big but the narrow footprint causes more issues than I care to deal with. I'd rather put most fish in a 40b than a standard 55
     

  3. OnTheFly Well Known Member Member

    20H is one of my favorite tanks. I have many other tanks when it isn't appropriate. 20L is better for a lot of species but I hate the appearance and got rid of mine.
     
  4. BottomDweller Fishlore VIP Member

    Tall tanks without a lot of footprint aren't great for fish.

    In your 20 high you could have a few endlers or a school of CPD, ember tetras or chili rasboras.
     

  5. Cory & the Catz Member Member

    Yea i have a 20 gallon hex and people on here tend to say its too small for my stock, because i saw danios work in a 20g but after getting them i have been told a lot my tank is too small but they seem to enjoy it they swim circles around the tank and chase eachother often playing tag just the same as in the long tank at the store i watched them play tag in. i feel like the cool part about a tall tank is you can kinda layer it with a choice of bottomfeeder a school of mid swimmers and a top swimmer or two, but i hear people criticizing my tanks setup a lot. The real pain is finding decor that covers more vertical space than horizontal space but i've got tons of hiding places for my fish now and they seem to love them.
     
  6. Rachel K Member Member

    Tall tanks are definitely hard to stock, but my platies do well in my 20H because they swim around the entire water column. It's all about buying the right tank for the right fish, I think it is smart to already know your stock before buying a tank to ensure you never have this issue.
     
  7. Books&Fish Well Known Member Member

    I was debating between the 40 long and 40 breeder. I'm glad I went with the breeder.
     

  8. OnTheFly Well Known Member Member

    Hexes are not ideal but work for non-schooling species that will swim at all levels of the tank. I had guppies in one many years ago and they live as long as they are supposed to. A hex is very easy to overstock though.
     
  9. Books&Fish Well Known Member Member

    I bought the 20 high because of space. If I went with a long, the extra 6 inches would be sticking out into the hallway and get constantly bumped and banged into by kids (and us adults). It was also my first tank and I didn't now what I was doing (and subsequent frantic google searching because of deaths). So no, I didn't have stock picked out first. I think most new fishkeepers don't.
     
  10. Fashooga Well Known Member Member

    When I first started I bought a 55g...today I kind of regret it and now that I'm at a 85g I'm more happy cause it's deeper than the 55g so more room for the fish to turn and stuff.

    Now I have a 55g sitting in the hallway with nothing. I might do something wit it later, just not sure since your limited with it due to the depth of the tank it self. I could try to sell it on Craigslist but here everybody has a 55g. I should have went with a 75g when I first started.
     

  11. grantm91 Well Known Member Member

    They are what you make of them, id never have a tall or cube tank as a fw set up i like tall or cubed as a reef with my clowns which just like to go up and down or play in the flow, anything i have fw, the longer and wider the better. The 55 is a bit of a con as newbies think its big and think you can stick things like silver dollars in there and bala sharks, if you have a 55 and your asking the lfs for advise as your new to it your easy prey to have oscars and such dumped on you.
     
  12. Books&Fish Well Known Member Member

    I do have platies and danios. Both started in my 20 high tank. They are all in my 75g now. The difference is stark. Both groups are much more happy in the space of a 75g. And after seeing the change in behavior, I now feel guilty about stocking the 20 high.

    I considered CPDs, but heard they are very shy. I'm keeping a list of possibilities and they are on it, but I might just try selling it again.
     
  13. Books&Fish Well Known Member Member

    I have actually considered turning my 20 high into a fowler with a pair of clownfish and maybe a starfish. I read into the work involved and I don't think I'm ready for refractometers and skimmers yet (although the kids would love it!)
     
  14. grantm91 Well Known Member Member

    Its easy, honestly theres nothing to fear especially with clowns they are hardy, 20tall would be great with 2 clowns, a nice rock scape and some inverts. Thats what its about getting the most out of your tanks footprint.
     
  15. Books&Fish Well Known Member Member

    I'll add them to my list ;)
     
  16. BottomDweller Fishlore VIP Member

    Yeah I have platies and zebra and leopard danios in my 48" tank. I think even a 20 long is way too small for danios.