Will toxic materials from API CO2 booster dissolve

paultae3

Will toxic materials from API CO2 dissolve? Do I have to change the water or they can dissolve by their own? What the side effect that might effect human body?
 

MacZ

What do you mean?

If that stuff is the same as other "liquid CO2"-products, it is Glutaraldehyde.
Here you will find everything you need to know:
Glutaraldehyde - Wikipedia

I'd do some big waterchanges and then stop using the stuff alltogether.
 

SeattleRoy

In water, glutaraldehyde will degrade quickly. Depending on
how much oxygen is available in the water, glutaraldehyde
might turn into carbon dioxide or another chemical (1,5-
pentanediol)
 

RayClem

Gluteraldehyde is sometimes sold as a CO2 precursor. In higher concentrations, the chemical is a high level disinfectant used to kill bacteria, funguses, and viruses. The concentration sold for aquarium use is not nearly that high. However, it still is a good algaecide. By reducing the growth of algae, the plants in the tank will have better access to the CO2 that is available. If you are serious about adding CO2, get a proper CO2 injection system, but that is only needed if you have a tank with high lighting and plants that need the extra light and CO2. Many aquatic plants do just fine without it.
 

MacZ

CO2 precursor.
Nope. It's just supposed to be a source of bio-available carbon. Which... it is not.

SeattleRoy : Is that a quote (if so, can you procide a source?) or did you accidently put your post as a quote?
In any case this means it can cause oxygen depletion. Charming little chemical...
 

RayClem

Nope. It's just supposed to be a source of bio-available carbon. Which... it is not.

SeattleRoy : Is that a quote (if so, can you procide a source?) or did you accidently put your post as a quote?
In any case this means it can cause oxygen depletion. Charming little chemical...

I said it it is SOLD as a CO2 preccursor. I agree with you that it does not function well in the role. As an algaecide, it works reasonably well.

The following video is produced by the plant experts at Tropica in Denmark.

 

MacZ

said it it is SOLD as a CO2 preccursor. I agree with you that it does not function well in the role.
Ah, sorry, wasn't sure what part of the sentence was more important. ;)

As an algaecide, it works reasonably well.
Yes. Thanks for the video. Very thorough PSA. Very much the right approach to that stuff.
 

SeattleRoy

Nope. It's just supposed to be a source of bio-available carbon. Which... it is not.

SeattleRoy : Is that a quote (if so, can you procide a source?) or did you accidently put your post as a quote?
In any case this means it can cause oxygen depletion. Charming little chemical...
Hi MacZ

Actually it is a source of carbon molecules and if the limiting factor in plant growth is lack of carbon then it can improve growth. Tom Barr (yes the Tom Barr of EI fame) did a presentation for our club here in Seattle where he explained how glutaraldehyde is broken down and its carbon molecules are able to insert themselves into the Calvin Cycle. It is not preferred source of carbon for a plant like CO2 but it does provide additional carbon molecules if they are in short supply.

As for the source for the quote I provided: https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/toxfaqs/tfacts208.pdf

Hope this helps! -Roy
 

MacZ

Considering the high levels of DOC in many aquaria that makes that stuff barely useful for the standard aquarist in fertilizer contexts. What a waste.

Thanks for the source text, though.

So that guy is behind the EI... The technique is known in Europe, but there is never a name given with it.
I'm more of a user of the DI - the Duckweed Index. I use floating plants as indicators in minimal nutrient influx environments. Foolproof.
 

RayClem

Since gluteraldehyde is a hydrocarbon, it does provide carbon to the system. However, there are hundreds of hydrocarbons including methanol, ethanol, sugar, starch, ethylene glycol antifreeze, gasoline and diesel fuel. The best bioavailable source of carbon for plants is carbon dioxide, not some liquid substitute. I guess if you add sugar to your aquarium and there are yeast organisms in the tank, they will convert the sugar to ethanol and CO2. I am not sure I want yeast growing in my tank.
 

MacZ

I am not sure I want yeast growing in my tank.
Some species of yeasts are already in your tank. And mine. And everybody elses. :D
 

RayClem

Some species of yeasts are already in your tank. And mine. And everybody elses. :D
Yeast is everywhere, you cannot avoid it. That does not mean I want to promote a yeast bloom by adding sugar.
 

MacZ

Yeast is everywhere, you cannot avoid it. That does not mean I want to promote a yeast bloom by adding sugar.
If you have brewer's or baker's yeast types, true. And nobody should add sugar to their tank anyway. :D
 

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