Will This Be A Cyanobacteria Outbreak? Help

Discussion in 'Algae' started by MaximumRide14, May 29, 2019.

  1. MaximumRide14

    MaximumRide14Well Known MemberMember

    This is 5.5 gallon tank. It has a betta, and also has lots of plants. It's filtered and heated at 78-80 degrees. The plants are some bacopa stems, brazilian pennywort, riccia fluitans (which is a little brown, and I can't tell if it's too much light or too little), a marimo moss ball, and some subwassertang portions. The light is LED and 12 Watts (if I remember correctly). It's set on a timer for 8 hours. I was looking closely at the tank and I think I may have seen a very small amount of cyanobacteria on the plants. I've dealt with cyano before, but I've only cleaned it (it always grew back quickly) until I got rid of the tank completely. I'll put some pics below to see if anyone can ID it.
    Also, I leave on Sunday for my vacation. The tank will still be on a set timer for the lighting, but I want to make sure this issue doesn't get significantly worse when I return in two weeks. I'm having someone to stop by to feed my fish two or three times; they can give me updates. But since these plants are being grown for profit, I want to make sure that they aren't dead or ruined.
    If anyone could help me out I'd appreciate it. Thanks.
    (PS, I know the tank looks ugly lol, I'm not good at aquascaping)
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  2. Fahn

    FahnFishlore VIPMember

    1) Do heavier weekly water changes twice weekly of 75% to reduce organics.
    2) Feed your fish sparingly, only once every other day.
    3) Set your light to 5-6 hours a day.
    4) Add an airstone or two for more oxygen and flow in the tank.
    5) If you aren't, begin dosing a comprehensive fertilizer (Thrive is much better than Flourish).
    6) Floating plants like Amazon Frogbit, Salvinia, Broad Leaf Water Sprite, or Dwarf Water Lettuce. These will not get algae on their leaves and soak up excess organics.
    7) Treat with Hydrogen Peroxide before water changes. Turn off filter, squirt on cyano with syringe, wait a few minutes, then do a heavy water change before turning filtration back on.
     
  3. OP
    OP
    MaximumRide14

    MaximumRide14Well Known MemberMember

    I can do 50% changes every day until Sunday, but then I'm gone for two weeks. Should I change the timer to 6 hrs. I'm not getting Thrive until I get back, but I'll dose with Seachem Flourish. I know it's not the best, but it's all I have until I am back from vacation. I'm pretty sure I have hydrogen peroxide, but will that harm my betta? I'll move some duckweed into the tank though. Is there any way to keep it separate from the floating riccia?
     
  4. Fahn

    FahnFishlore VIPMember

    See revised post, sorry
     
  5. OP
    OP
    MaximumRide14

    MaximumRide14Well Known MemberMember

    The revised post isn't coming up for me.
     
  6. Fahn

    FahnFishlore VIPMember

    It was just a revised water change schedule, no big deal.

    Your riccia is brown from lack of nutrients and algae.
     
  7. OP
    OP
    MaximumRide14

    MaximumRide14Well Known MemberMember

    Ok. Should I move the brown riccia to another tank for for the next couple days? I've had good luck growing plants in one tank, maybe that would help. Tomorrow I'll get to everything else on the 5.5 gallon tank.
     
  8. Fahn

    FahnFishlore VIPMember

    Trim off and throw out anything brown or too algae infested. Let the plant focus on growing new green leaves instead of trying to maintain damaged ones.
     
  9. OP
    OP
    MaximumRide14

    MaximumRide14Well Known MemberMember

    Ok thanks! I'll update tomorrow once I've made the changes.

    @Fahn I moved all the riccia to the other planted tank since it has the most success. I'll move it back Saturday night but I think for the time being it is best. I'm doing a 50% WC with a vacuum to try to remove the traces of cyano. I don't have hydrogen peroxide, but I can try to get it when I get back. I was thinking of moving plants into this tank because it will be the only one with light for two weeks, but maybe I shouldn't do that? Is it okay for the rest of my plants to go without lights for 2 weeks? I'm also filling 1/2-3/4 of the surface with duckweed.
    This is a really stupid question, but should I use BacterAE? It says it adds amino acids and enzymes. Although it's primarily for shrimp tanks, it also notes that it can aid water quality. Would it help?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 30, 2019
  10. angelcraze

    angelcrazeWell Known MemberMember

    I'm not so sure that's cyano. It looks blue green, but colors are hard to depict on screen. I haven't seen it being filamentous, but suppose it's possible.

    I don't think anyone has all the answers to get rid of cyano. There can be a numbers of causes for it. All I do is try to nip it in the bud. H2o2 treatments, keep substrate clean, avoid overfeeding, get plants growing well to use available light and outcompete cyano.

    For me, I think it's a combo of bright light and phosphates from food (and just in my water) that encourages it.
     
  11. OP
    OP
    MaximumRide14

    MaximumRide14Well Known MemberMember

    I really hope it isn't cyano. It is blue green though. I changed the timer and I'm cleaning the substrate now. Maybe tonight I'll change it to the blue light; it's less bright than the normal light.
    It's really frustrating that this came up right before I leave. I just hope this problem doesn't escalate while I'm gone and I have a bigger problem trying to save my plants. That's what happened when I had cyano in another tank.

    I have an idea... what if I moved the timer and the plants to the other tank that I'm successfully growing plants in? Then those plants would have light too, and maybe I could avoid this algae/cyano issue until I get back. I know that the brazilian pennywort can stay as a floating plant; maybe that would be safer than planting it down. Both the roots and the overall plant could grow and I'll put it back in the 5.5 gallon when I return. My only concern is the bacopa dying, but maybe I could just add two more root tabs for the batch and some Flourish?
    This 5.5 gallon then won't have light for two weeks any maybe the algae or cyano will die? That would be a win-win situation.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 30, 2019
  12. angelcraze

    angelcrazeWell Known MemberMember

    I feel your concern. Does it wipe off? Is there an odor?

    The only thing is what if cyano is brought in to a tank? I mean I know is ancient bacteria and everywhere, but what if follows plants into other tanks? Or do you plan to treat the plants first?

    Brazilian pennywort does much better floating. Especially if you are wanting to grow it quickly. I used to sell it as well. But it doesn't grow for me anymore GRRRRRR. I think it's the beam angle of LEDs, it always grew so well under t5 floating.

    Anyway if it was me, I'd just try to get rid of it all. Everything I could see before I leave. Be absolutely sure the person feeding your fish does not overfeed! That would push it over the edge of it's gonna happen. I've had a bad experience having someone feed my fish while I was gone for 5 days. Really bad.

    Or maybe a tub instead of your other tank? Leave the betta in the cycled 5.5g? I have a growout tub of plants. It's a 10g clear tote with a shoplight and 9W LED bulb.

    Idk, it's your decision.....
     
  13. OP
    OP
    MaximumRide14

    MaximumRide14Well Known MemberMember

    I always portion the food beforehand and have them dump the food from the bag in. That way they won't under or overfeed. I have hydrogen peroxide now, now I'm going to follow the steps @Fahn gave me to use it and then do a water change. I'll float the pennywort. I plan on treating the plants before I ship them, but I think I can get rid of it before I get to selling (I'm waiting for them to grow more). I'm doing the water change today but I'll move the betta while I do the peroxide treatment.
     
  14. angelcraze

    angelcrazeWell Known MemberMember

    Sounds good. I hope it goes well :)
     
  15. OP
    OP
    MaximumRide14

    MaximumRide14Well Known MemberMember

    Well, I'm back. There's lots of cyanobacteria now. Also the water level was much lower due to evaporation (any tips on fixing this besides less time on the light? I can't change the brightness but I can make the light blue). I added enough water to get it to the right leve;. I'm going to remove it tonight and do a water change tomorrow (maybe do a hydrogen peroxide treatment as well). I'm going to move some of my plants over to other tanks so they can grow while I sort this problem out.
     
  16. angelcraze

    angelcrazeWell Known MemberMember

    Oh blah, I'm so sorry to hear it got worse. It's such a pain in the butt! I hope you get it under control quickly. Be diligent, get that cyano out! And use the v plan @Fahn gave you. Just be careful not to cross contaminate your other tanks in case it does work like that.

    About your light, idk which one you have, but possibly reducing blue light would help. Just thinking blue light penetrates the furthest depth so more red light would help reduce intensity theoretically. But I'm not even sure if cyano happens with too much light or just if it just uses photosynthesis-period.

    I'm getting more cyano right now as well. I have to be on it almost daily, picking out contaminated gravel stones or plants (mostly floating). I think it is must be related to spring run off.
     
  17. OP
    OP
    MaximumRide14

    MaximumRide14Well Known MemberMember

    Ok, I'll make sure the plants have it off before moving them. I'll probably be doing more hydrogen peroxide too. Do you use 1ml/gal as recommended?
     
  18. Wraithen

    WraithenFishlore VIPMember

    It's best to spot treat with hydrogen peroxide. Alternatively, red slime remover, or blue slime remover (same product, just marketed to marine vs freshwater) clears me up quickly whenever I get any. It has such a beautiful color I usually spot it quickly.

    I would move things around to get better flow to that area. I usually get cyanobacteria in dead spots at the front of my tank.
     
  19. Fahn

    FahnFishlore VIPMember

    You could use erythromyacin, which is an antibiotic, but this may hurt your cycle.
     
  20. Mcasella

    McasellaFishlore VIPMember

    Looks more like hair algae than cyano, with cyano it normally would coat the leaf and not branch off into filaments. I believe H2O2 will work on hair algae as well though.
     
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