Will Diatmos Disappear On Its Own?

fishlover25

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I've started using phosguuard to remove phosphates from my tank since my tap water has phosoah. The main reason I started doing this is because my tank has had diatmos (brown algae) for the 4 years it has been running. Now that I am keeping phosphates at 0, will the diatoms disappear on their own or will I have to scrub it off?
 

Aquaphobia

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They might, but more slowly if you don't help it along by vacuuming out any diatoms that you see.
 
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fishlover25

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I do vacuum my gravel but all of the diatoms are on my plant decorations. Will it fall off from there or do I need to scrub it off my plants?
 

leftswerve

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Remove it all the best you can, then hope for the best. The decorations themselves could also be part of the problem.
 

Nart

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So it looks like you might have silicates that keeps coming back into the tank that feeds the diatom which may or may not disappear. Could be coming from a number of things. Maybe water?

Generally I don't recommend a fish in helping to solve an issue. But seeing that your tank is pretty well aged and if you need help tidying up the tank while you are trying to figure out your diatom issue. Oto fishes are excellent diatom/algae eaters. Be warned - they will deplete your diatoms depending on the tank size and how many you get. Which means you will have to supplement their diet with something else or grow diatoms specifically for them to eat. (Obviously you would only get them if its a community tank and it's big enough to house 'em)
 

Aquaphobia

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They don't stick to surfaces quite as well as other algaes, more like dust really so you can just brush past them with the vacuum or your hand and it should all fall off.

If you do get something to eat the diatoms make sure it's temperature compatible. Ottos are cooler water critters and like to be in groups

You might try a nerite snail!
 
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fishlover25

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So it looks like you might have silicates that keeps coming back into the tank that feeds the diatom which may or may not disappear. Could be coming from a number of things. Maybe water?

Generally I don't recommend a fish in helping to solve an issue. But seeing that your tank is pretty well aged and if you need help tidying up the tank while you are trying to figure out your diatom issue. Oto fishes are excellent diatom/algae eaters. Be warned - they will deplete your diatoms depending on the tank size and how many you get. Which means you will have to supplement their diet with something else or grow diatoms specifically for them to eat. (Obviously you would only get them if its a community tank and it's big enough to house 'em)
It's definitely in my tap water. Phosguard removes silicates as well so that should help.

They don't stick to surfaces quite as well as other algaes, more like dust really so you can just brush past them with the vacuum or your hand and it should all fall off.

If you do get something to eat the diatoms make sure it's temperature compatible. Ottos are cooler water critters and like to be in groups

You might try a nerite snail!
It isn't that dusty. Does that mean it isn't diatoms? I do have nerite snails already which has helped a lot. My main question was wondering if it would just fall off on its own or if I still had to clean it. Kind of like how soap can lift dirt and then it can be washed away, I was wondering if the diatoms would die and fall off without needing to be cleaned since they wouldn't have phosphates or silicates to continue living.
 

Aquaphobia

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I recommend vacuuming them up because even though they will eventually die and fall off diatoms are famous for having silica-based skeletons (the source of diatomaceous earth) that survive for eons. They could well break down and provide the building blocks for another generation!
 
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