Wild Type Bettas

Discussion in 'Betta Fish' started by RyleighJ, Apr 17, 2017.

  1. RyleighJ

    RyleighJ Valued Member Member

    I've been reading on the forum about people and their bettas and... Now I want a betta

    I remember seeing something about wild bettas (or at least that's what they were called), and I think I might be interested in getting one! But I have some questions.

    A lot of questions, actually.

    1) What exactly is a wild betta? It's a whole different species, right, not just a tail type? And it's actually a type of betta people keep in aquariums, it doesn't just refer to bettas living in the wild? (I just remember seeing a picture of a wild betta and thinking it was beautiful/interesting, so I really know NOTHING about them)

    2) Do wild bettas have the same requirements as regular bettas? What size tank do they need? Are they more difficult to care for than regular bettas?

    3) Do wild bettas act the same as regular bettas? My favorite thing about bettas is their personality!

    4) Where does one get wild bettas? Can you buy them from a lfs, or do you need to order them online?

    ...Okay, I think that's it. Sorry if this information is somewhere else on Fishlore, I had no clue where to look.
     
  2. 2211Nighthawk

    2211Nighthawk Fishlore VIP Member

    The bettas we see in aquariums were bred for aggression and as a side effect, colour. Wild bettas I would think (not positive) would be less colourful and aggressive so they might not have the same personality. Otherwise I would think parameters and all that would be the same. I would expect you'd have to get them online because being less colourfull they are not in as high of demand and LFS are less likely to carry them. I don't have a lot of experience with bettas so someone more experienced then me will have to confirm. Mine is the typical domesticated.
     
  3. chromedome52

    chromedome52 Fishlore VIP Member

    There are many species of Betta, and some are spectacularly colored. One of the most sought after, B. macrostoma, is a giant mouthbrooding species that is bright red-orange with distinctive black bands in the tail. There are, of course, other species that are fairly similar to B. splendens, which has become hard to find as actual wild fish.

    Different species have different requirements. Most Betta species are actually mouthbrooders, and they can be as small as 1.75 inches or as large as 5 inches. So you would have to research the species you are interested in to know what is needed to maintain them.

    Personally, I don't see any "personality" in regular Bettas, so I can't respond to that inquiry.

    Buying different species of Betta requires going to a specialty or an auction website. Once in a great while a small shop might have access to odd Betta species, but for the most part, you will have to look online for sources.
     
  4. bakpau

    bakpau Valued Member Member

    Wild bettas come from their native countries in south east asia, such as indonesia, vietnam, brunei, malaysia and thailand.
    They are now very rare aka almost extinct, yet in my country (indonesia) some people still catch & sell them, as they are more expensive than regular bettas without thinking of the conservation status.
    They live in pH 4-6 if im not mistaken, more acidic than regular bettas, & for the diet im not too sure, should be the same except they probably wont like pellets lol, and i think the temperature is slightly colder.
    Thats all i know, I suggest you do more and more research online before you decide on buying these extremely rare bettas, or better, just leave them in their native habitat
     
  5. OP
    OP
    RyleighJ

    RyleighJ Valued Member Member

    Thank you! I definitely don't want to contribute to declining populations, so I think I'll just stick with the normal domestic guys
     
  6. chromedome52

    chromedome52 Fishlore VIP Member

    You don't have to actually get wild fish, you can get wild types that have been aquarium bred. Betta imbellis is known as the Peaceful Betta, as it looks very much like wild type splendens, but males do not fight if given reasonable space in an aquarium. A group can be easily kept in a 20 gallon tank. The ones you would find are almost certainly going to be aquarium bred.
     




  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice