Wild-life photos - Page 33

Cold&warm

Member
fish 321 said:
Here are some more pictures from Montana.
Gorgeous!
Montana comes from the Spanish (have no tilde on my keyboard)?
What type of trout in the last picture?

fish 321 said:
Its a brown trout.
Thank you.
Funny, I just read that this species originated in Europe and was from there introduced to other regions of the world.

I wonder if the opposite has somehow happened with salmon and eel..
 

fish 321

Member
Cold&warm said:
Gorgeous!
Montana comes from the Spanish (have no tilde on my keyboard)?
What type of trout in the last picture?
Its a brown trout.
 

Wolf010

Member
Cold&warm said:
Wow!
I am "jealous" (inverted commas because without them would be against me principles...)
Here we have only 2 seasons: hot and cool (more than cold - by your Canadian standards).
Normally a few days per year at or slightly under the freezing point.
I guess there must be lots of artists where you live - with these colo(u)rs...
Today was a stifling day and trees still display full colo(u)rs.
I am happy that where you live there is so much that makes the eye and the heart rejoice...


Just to be sure is this your city?
The only 2 seasons in Singapore, where I live, is blazing hot and monsoon -w-
 

Cold&warm

Member
Wolf010 said:
The only 2 seasons in Singapore, where I live, is blazing hot and monsoon -w-
Hmmmm, after all, where I am, I'm better off than in many other places of the world..... Thanks for reminding me.
A cousin of mine presented me years ago with an airplane ticket to visit her ailing mother in Jakarta (my aunt died less than half a year later, a week after my cousin herself had died).
It was in February and they said it was the cold season. If that was the cold season, I probably would have collapsed, had I been there in the hot season. High temperatures at a humidity of 100%, that's not for everyone who was born in the western part of the globe ... In this case, I could not count on my DNA.
 

Wolf010

Member
Cold weather in Singapore is abt 28 degree Celsius, warm weather is like 36-37 degree Celsius
 

DoubleDutch

Member
Autumn fauna and flora in Germany
 

Cold&warm

Member
DoubleDutch said:
Autumn fauna and flora in Germany
What is the (scientific) name of the mushrooms in the second picture?
Have you ever seen them in Holland?
The picture brings back memories of my first reading book in first grade, featuring tiny gnomes living in mushrooms.
My primary school was close to the dunes, which added to the magic.
I always hoped to meet a gnome, but never saw one ....
 

DoubleDutch

Member
Cold&warm said:
What is the (scientific) name of the mushrooms in the second picture?
Have you ever seen them in Holland?
The picture brings back memories of my first reading book in first grade, featuring tiny gnomes living in mushrooms.
My primary school was close to the dunes, which added to the magic.
I always hoped to meet a gnome, but never saw one ....
Don't know exactly (will check later in an ID-book : third as well).

Yeah the inhabitant of the red one came home a few minutes later.
 

MomeWrath

Member
This is not the most amazing of photographs, but the subject is a matter of interest. This was taken in a little town in western North Carolina called Brevard, where my daughter is planning to attend college. There are many folk stories of where they came from, but I don't think anyone knows for sure. You'll see in the photo that this is not an albino, it is just white. They are a treasure to the town and don't seem to pop up much anywhere else in the state. I found them fascinating.
 

DoubleDutch

Member
Magicpenny75 said:
This is not the most amazing of photographs, but the subject is a matter of interest. This was taken in a little town in western North Carolina called Brevard, where my daughter is planning to attend college. There are many folk stories of where they came from, but I don't think anyone knows for sure. You'll see in the photo that this is not an albino, it is just white. They are a treasure to the town and don't seem to pop up much anywhere else in the state. I found them fascinating.
Looks leucistic
 

MomeWrath

Member
DoubleDutch said:
Looks leucistic
Yes some of them are more white than others. The weird thing is the prevalence of white squirrels in this one area. Probably 1/3 of all the squirrels there are white or semi-white.
Here's an article about them:
 

Cold&warm

Member
DoubleDutch said:
Yeah the inhabitant of the red one came home a few minutes later.
Ah, ah, ah! This is HI - LA - RI -OUS !!!! I can't stop laughing.
What a pity my mom isn't around anymore to share your post # 1610 with ....
 

Cold&warm

Member
To Algonquin and to whoever it may concern:

I just finished watching this video on YouTube

At 3:57 -5:03 it deals with the northern pitcher plant / turtle sock, which - as was only very recently discovered, eats vertebrates. The video states that visitors to Algonquin Park are advised to keep their children away from these plants.
I guess the tiny little fingers of human offspring are at risk, brrrr !!!!
 

MD_Plants

Member
Wow! I have a few pitched plants that are quite big. iv come back and seen sometimes they have a frog or a baby mouse in it!
 

Elkwatcher

Member
DoubleDutch said:
Don't know exactly (will check later in an ID-book : third as well).

Yeah the inhabitant of the red one came home a few minutes later.
The Amanita is gorgeous... reminds me of the smoking caterpillar.



Magicpenny75 said:
This is not the most amazing of photographs, but the subject is a matter of interest. This was taken in a little town in western North Carolina called Brevard, where my daughter is planning to attend college. There are many folk stories of where they came from, but I don't think anyone knows for sure. You'll see in the photo that this is not an albino, it is just white. They are a treasure to the town and don't seem to pop up much anywhere else in the state. I found them fascinating.
Nice Varmint, sure stands out for predators.. our's blend in better!



 

Cold&warm

Member
Elkwatcher said:
The Amanita is gorgeous... reminds me of the smoking caterpillar.
Thanks for pitching in, I guess my fellow countryman is too busy taking new wild-life pictures, to look 'm mushrooms up.....
Do I see and understand correctly that the illustration comes from Alice in Wonderland?
As a kid I had difficulty to "grasp" the train of thought of that book and that of Winnie-the-Pooh. Although - as stated earlier - on a clear day I could see the coast of England from the seashore, my mindset apparently was not English enough.
I surmise that culturally Canada still is very much connected to the British world.
Fairy tales in my childhood would connect to the (German) Grimm Brothers who wrote down already existing folk tales and, to a lesser degree, (the Danish author) Hans Christian Andersen who wrote fairy tales himself. (As a child his fairy tales would leave me with a sense of sadness, though. Later I read a biographical sketch about him: he was never really happy, it seems.)

Another - IMO immensely intriguing - YT video I watched this evening

mentions another book which seems to be a classic in your continent: Island of the Blue Dolphins. Would you recommend it?
 

Elkwatcher

Member
I collected children's books, still have some vintage, especially fond of the illustrations. I once had a first edition of a Grimm's Fairy Tales, it had gold guilt on the cover jacket and spine and had it's own box that it slipped into. I still have a ratty copy of Winnie the Pooh. My favourite by far is the Thorton Burgess series of nature stories, Ready the Fox, Old Mr Toad, Paddy the Beaver, and a few others. I have heard of the movie Island of the Blue Dolphins... shall look it up Cold&warm.
 

Cold&warm

Member
Elkwatcher said:
I collected children's books, still have some vintage, especially fond of the illustrations. I once had a first edition of a Grimm's Fairy Tales, it had gold guilt on the cover jacket and spine and had it's own box that it slipped into. I still have a ratty copy of Winnie the Pooh. My favourite by far is the Thorton Burgess series of nature stories, Ready the Fox, Old Mr Toad, Paddy the Beaver, and a few others. I have heard of the movie Island of the Blue Dolphins... shall look it up Cold&warm.
Thank you very much!
Since a few days it is really cold (fresh by Canadian standards) here. We have a two-season year: warm (hot) and cold (cool). The transition is increasingly abrupt. The cold brings me in In-the-bleak-midwinter-mood. I like to sing along with YT-videos. A fellow YouTuber, a singer (apparently a well-known one in her native Scotland) and an expert on Scottish-Gaelic lore, promised me to transcribe the (Scottish) Gaelic text. The way I see it, those extant Celtic tongues (located in Ireland, Scotland, Wales and ... north-west France) must contain very old sounds.
It is also the type of weather and atmosphere that most calls for reading...
BTW, is Joan Walsh Anglund Canadian?
I remember reciting during my school years a poem on December written by her.
My classmates liked the poem very much.

Edit (1): Joan Walsh Anglund is American.
Edit (2): Have you read this? Thornton Burgess - Wikipedia
 

fish 321

Member
Elkwatcher said:
Nice Varmint, sure stands out for predators.. our's blend in better!



is that one a red squirrel?
 

fish 321

Member
I guess I'll jump in on the rodent pictures
 

DoubleDutch

Member
Cold&warm said:
Thanks for pitching in, I guess my fellow countryman is too busy taking new wild-life pictures, to look 'm mushrooms up.....
Do I see and understand correctly that the illustration comes from Alice in Wonderland?
As a kid I had difficulty to "grasp" the train of thought of that book and that of Winnie-the-Pooh. Although - as stated earlier - on a clear day I could see the coast of England from the seashore, my mindset apparently was not English enough.
I surmise that culturally Canada still is very much connected to the British world.
Fairy tales in my childhood would connect to the (German) Grimm Brothers who wrote down already existing folk tales and, to a lesser degree, (the Danish author) Hans Christian Andersen who wrote fairy tales himself. (As a child his fairy tales would leave me with a sense of sadness, though. Later I read a biographical sketch about him: he was never really happy, it seems.)

Another - IMO immensely intriguing - YT video I watched this evening

mentions another book which seems to be a classic in your continent: Island of the Blue Dolphins. Would you recommend it?
Not entirely true, but I couldn't find it hahahaha
 

fish 321

Member
Here is a picture of a cutthroat/rainbow trout hybrid
 

Cold&warm

Member
DoubleDutch said:
Not entirely true, but I couldn't find it hahahaha
I apologize for having suspected you of negligence ...
Chiedo venia e scusa ... .
 

Cold&warm

Member
fish 321 said:
Here is a picture of a cutthroat/rainbow trout hybrid
Reminds me of holidays I spent during my childhood in Germany, in the Black Forest and Bavaria.
Watching this picture I can almost hear the delightful sound of those crystal-clear, fast-streaming waters again, in which trout thrived...
 

Elkwatcher

Member
Cold&warm said:
Thank you very much!
Since a few days it is really cold (fresh by Canadian standards) here. We have a two-season year: warm (hot) and cold (cool). The transition is increasingly abrupt. The cold brings me in In-the-bleak-midwinter-mood. I like to sing along with YT-videos. A fellow YouTuber, a singer (apparently a well-known one in her native Scotland) and an expert on Scottish-Gaelic lore, promised me to transcribe the (Scottish) Gaelic text. The way I see it, those extant Celtic tongues (located in Ireland, Scotland, Wales and ... north-west France) must contain very old sounds.
It is also the type of weather and atmosphere that most calls for reading...
BTW, is Joan Walsh Anglund Canadian?
I remember reciting during my school years a poem on December written by her.
My classmates liked the poem very much.

Edit (1): Joan Walsh Anglund is American.
Edit (2): Have you read this? Thornton Burgess - Wikipedia
Cold&warm Enchanting s, she was a wonderful illustrator! I will watch for her books or poetry now, thank you. I first learned of Thornton Burgess in the convent school I attended in my early childhood. Head resting on crossed arms on my desk, eye's closed, the teacher read chapter's daily.. my imagination soared I longed for the next story. Computer's will never replace books!
 

Cold&warm

Member
Elkwatcher said:
Cold&warm Enchanting s, she was a wonderful illustrator! I will watch for her books or poetry now, thank you. I first learned of Thornton Burgess in the convent school I attended in my early childhood. Head resting on crossed arms on my desk, eye's closed, the teacher read chapter's daily.. my imagination soared I longed for the next story. Computer's will never replace books!
According to WikI - which has a very short entry on her that does not provide a precise birthdate: Joan Walsh Anglund - Wikipedia - she is still around. Fortunately....
Sounds like you had marvelous years in primary school...
I loved going to school, too. There was apparently not so much reading by the teacher as in your school - at least, as far as I can remember (although I have a very distinct memory of those years).
There is one story from first grade in elementary school that stands out among all others. I looked it up a while ago to be able to link it in, and my hunch that it was collected by the Grimm brothers was confirmed: . The Dutch title of the German story is much more evocative and has the rhythm of a nursery rhyme: Tafeltje dek je! (Table, be set!), Ezeltje, strek je! (Donkey, stretch!), Knuppel uit de zak! (Cudgel, out of the sack!) Like for the Thornton Burgess stories, it took our teacher several reading hours to finish the story, which filled me with wonder - something that has accompanied me to this day.
You are right: the computer will never be able to create the enchantment and the bliss brought by a book...

Funny, somewhere along the line the English title of the Grimm story is automatically modified and **** appear...
 

Cold&warm

Member
Algonquin said:
A few more 'fall colours' pics - taken over the Thanksgiving weekend in Restoule Provincial Park (near North Bay, Ontario). Colours are at peak!
Wow! Sen - sa - tio - nal !!

Since a day or two, the layout of Fishlore in my computer has changed. I wonder if that is a general thing.
To put it in Italian: non ognI cambiamento è (univocamente) un miglioramento - not every change is (only) an improvement.
Here I would have pushed the Winner-button !!
 

Algonquin

Member
Cold&warm said:
To put it in Italian: non ognI cambiamento è un miglioramento - not every change is an improvement.
I'd click the 'Agree' button on this... but it too has disappeared
 

Elkwatcher

Member
Algonquin said:
A few more 'fall colours' pics - taken over the Thanksgiving weekend in Restoule Provincial Park (near North Bay, Ontario). Colours are at peak!
How can one not appreciate this Paradise, it is like an artist's palette. It's unfortunate there is no "winner" icon anymore.. I "agree" with Cold&warm we want our agree button back....must we go on strike lol!

Rainy day, the babies were getting wet.
 

Cold&warm

Member
Elkwatcher said:
Rainy day, the babies were getting wet.
Would they need the rain to clean their coats from parassites?

When I was a kid (and later a teenager), in our tiny (but progressive) country there were no more than two television channels which broadcast only from (about) 7 p.m. till midnight, except for rather short but delightful programs for kids in the afternoon of Wednesdays and Saturdays and a longer family program on Sunday afternoons.

In those years there was a marvelous series called "Audubon Wildlife Theatre". I surmise Roosevelt Elk were among the species presented.
 

Elkwatcher

Member
Cold&warm said:
Would they need the rain to clean their coats from parassites?

When I was a kid (and later a teenager), in our tiny (but progressive) country there were no more than two television channels which broadcast only from (about) 7 p.m. till midnight, except for rather short but delightful programs for kids in the afternoon of Wednesdays and Saturdays and a longer family program on Sunday afternoons.

In those years there was a marvelous series called "Audubon Wildlife Theatre". I surmise Roosevelt Elk were among the species presented.
The only thing I can think of that they might be bothered with is ticks, and rain would not affect them. I remember Audubon Theatre, it was a Canadian series.
 

Momgoose56

Member
Dave125g said:
We all love animals, so I.
figured I'd start this. Here's what I think is a Turkey Vulture.
apparently he doesn't like the paparazzi.
Please post pictures of wild critters from your neck of the woods
Dave125g said:
Wow a juvenile. You mean this guy is gonna get bigger? He hangs out waiting for the bear to make a mess out of the garbage. Then cleans up after him.
It is a black vulture! They're awesome! I had the privilege of taking care of one at the wildlife rescue where I volunteer.
 

Elkwatcher

Member
The Bulls











 

Momgoose56

Member
Elkwatcher said:
The Bulls











Those are amazing shots!
Well here's a Bull Aphonopelma chalcodes! Okay, Western desert tarantula. Just want you to know I tracked the thing all day to get this picture...
 

Elkwatcher

Member
Momgoose56 said:
Those are amazing shots!
Well here's a Bull Aphonopelma chalcodes! Okay, Western desert tarantula. Just want you to know I tracked the thing all day to get this picture...
Momgoose56... and you have that running around your basement!!! Are they pretty docile?
 

Algonquin

Member
Momgoose56 said:
Well here's a Bull Aphonopelma chalcodes! Okay, Western desert tarantula. Just want you to know I tracked the thing all day to get this picture...
I think we need a YIKES emojI for that one!
 

Momgoose56

Member
Algonquin said:
I think we need a YIKES emojI for that one!
I didn't actually track it lol! He just walked into my house after a downpour. I had to coax him out. They show up a lot after it rains.
 

Momgoose56

Member
Elkwatcher said:
Momgoose56... and you have that running around your basement!!! Are they pretty docile?
He walked in the back door. They are. I just scooted my foot near him and herded him back outside.
This is the impressive guy. A gorgeous little (pretty mad) diamondback rattle snake. He had to be relocated about 50yards away. He didn't come back on the porch.
 

Algonquin

Member
Momgoose56 said:
He just walked into my house after a downpour
I'm generally not bothered by spiders at all, but if that 'just walked' into my house, I'm pretty sure I wouldn't be inclined to calmly 'coax him out' LOL. How big is he? Can't tell from the picture... I'm imagining about the size of a tennis ball
 

Momgoose56

Member
Algonquin said:
I'm generally not bothered by spiders at all, but if that 'just walked' into my house, I'm pretty sure I wouldn't be inclined to calmly 'coax him out' LOL. How big is he? Can't tell from the picture... I'm imagining about the size of a tennis ball
A flat tennis ball lol! I had three that walked in at once one time after rain. (We leave the door open a lot) Two were on the ceiling just inside the door and one crawling up the back of a recliner 10 feet away. We had to catch those ones and physically move them- they refused to be herded...lol! I kinda like them but spiders creep me out too. My husband catches the spiders and moves them usually. He can't stand snakes so I catch those and move them.
 

chromedome52

Member
Momgoose56 said:
It is a black vulture! They're awesome! I had the privilege of taking care of one at the wildlife rescue where I volunteer.
Actually, in upper NY state it would most likely be a juvenile Turkey Vulture. I had a couple that found a carcass in the field across the street from my house last spring, and did some research. I initially thought Black, because both species supposedly can range this far north, but when I contacted the local nature center, they said that juvenile Turkeys can be mistaken for Blacks. One of them flew just over my head with wings spread, but I didn't have my phone out for pictures yet. The video I got of them later that day was too far away. Upstate NY is even further north than Saltwater Michigan, so it is unlikely to be a Black Vulture.
 

Demeter

Member
Found this little guy in a mud puddle while deer hunting this morning. It was about 40F so he wasn’t moving much. Took the little bugger home in my pocket and will be releasing it into a small lake soon enough.

See the little point on its nose? Still has the egg tooth so not very old at all.


We often find little snapper hatchlings where we hunt despite there only being a small pond/swamp nearby. Not an uncommon rescue at this point. Just wish the mom would lay her eggs closer to the swamp. Little dude probably would of been a raccoon snack if left alone.
 

Momgoose56

Member
chromedome52 said:
Actually, in upper NY state it would most likely be a juvenile Turkey Vulture. I had a couple that found a carcass in the field across the street from my house last spring, and did some research. I initially thought Black, because both species supposedly can range this far north, but when I contacted the local nature center, they said that juvenile Turkeys can be mistaken for Blacks. One of them flew just over my head with wings spread, but I didn't have my phone out for pictures yet. The video I got of them later that day was too far away. Upstate NY is even further north than Saltwater Michigan, so it is unlikely to be a Black Vulture.
I looked closer, and I still mus say, that head and beak sure look like a black to me. Ive been up close and personal with both- I used to hand feed the adult Black we rescued. Juvenile turkey vultures in Arizona have really naked heads and necks and typically slightly lighter tips on their wing feathers. Maybe they're different further north. I'm in Arizona. Once, we got a "Mexican Eagle"- a Northern crested caracara-that's kind of an awesome type of glorified vulture. He had flukes in his throat from eating infected pond fish. He was treated, recovered and was released. Awesome, unique looking bird.
 

Momgoose56

Member
Demeter said:
Found this little guy in a mud puddle while deer hunting this morning. It was about 40F so he wasn’t moving much. Took the little bugger home in my pocket and will be releasing it into a small lake soon enough.

See the little point on its nose? Still has the egg tooth so not very old at all.


We often find little snapper hatchlings where we hunt despite there only being a small pond/swamp nearby. Not an uncommon rescue at this point. Just wish the mom would lay her eggs closer to the swamp. Little dude probably would of been a raccoon snack if left alone.
Did he eat anyt of the bloodworms or was he too cold? They're so CUTE when they're babies!
 

Demeter

Member
Momgoose56 said:
Did he eat anyt of the bloodworms or was he too cold? They're so CUTE when they're babies!
He’s pretty active now, I made him mad and put one in his mouth but he hasn’t eaten it. Threw in some white worms as well, maybe the movement will be more enticing.
 

Elkwatcher

Member
Momgoose56 said:
He walked in the back door. They are. I just scooted my foot near him and herded him back outside.
This is the impressive guy. A gorgeous little (pretty mad) diamondback rattle snake. He had to be relocated about 50yards away. He didn't come back on the porch.
Nope, nope, and more nope... Not when they get that big!
 

Momgoose56

Member
fish 321 said:
Here is a picture of a cutthroat/rainbow trout hybrid
That's a beautiful fish!
 

Cold&warm

Member
Momgoose56 said:
He walked in the back door. They are. I just scooted my foot near him and herded him back outside.
This is the impressive guy. A gorgeous little (pretty mad) diamondback rattle snake. He had to be relocated about 50yards away. He didn't come back on the porch.
Doesn't really look "little" to me, he left his egg a long time ago ...
 

Cold&warm

Member
Elkwatcher said:
The Bulls











Isn't there a risk to get so close to them, even outside the mating-season?
They're not just little doggies which at most can bark at you.
And they must be awfully fast and their antlers frightfully sharp.
 

Momgoose56

Member
Cold&warm said:
Doesn't really look "little" to me, he left his egg a long time ago ...
He was only about 3 feet long.
 

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