Wild jumping spider care questions

fishbreeeder
Member
Yesterday, my mom found a jumping spider. She managed to put it in a jar and later gave it to me! He/she is a daring/bold jumping spider. Below is a pic of his new cage. Today, I caught him a fly and he totally POUNCED on it! Must have been hungry, poor fella. Anyways I named him Percy (like Percy Jackson). The temp is about 70-100 here, is that ok? I spray a side of his cage with water every day. I was wondering if continuous flies would be an ok diet, or should I buy a small cricket every once in a while. Am I doing everything right? And how often should I feed him? TYSM!!!!!!!
 
Broggy
Member
is having jumping spiders as pets a thing people do? it sounds like fun.
 
  • Thread Starter
fishbreeeder
Member
Broggy said:
is having jumping spiders as pets a thing people do? it sounds like fun.
Yep, lots of people keep them!
 
Lmg01
Member
fishbreeeder said:
Yesterday, my mom found a jumping spider. She managed to put it in a jar and later gave it to me! He/she is a daring/bold jumping spider. Below is a pic of his new cage. Today, I caught him a fly and he totally POUNCED on it! Must have been hungry, poor fella. Anyways I named him Percy (like Percy Jackson). The temp is about 70-100 here, is that ok? I spray a side of his cage with water every day. I was wondering if continuous flies would be an ok diet, or should I buy a small cricket every once in a while. Am I doing everything right? And how often should I feed him? TYSM!!!!!!!
70-85 is good temp for them. You can feed it crickets and mealworms as well as flies. They are easy to find. Feed it every 2-3 days. That’s what I got from some quick research. I know nothing about spiders
 
  • Thread Starter
fishbreeeder
Member
Lmg01 said:
70-85 is good temp for them. You can feed it crickets and mealworms as well as flies. They are easy to find. Feed it every 2-3 days. That’s what I got from some quick research. I know nothing about spiders
TYSM!!!!!!!!!
 
betta06
Member
aww so cute I also have a few of them!

I keep mine in medium-large mason jars depending on their size with a paper towel as a lid (this will give more ventilation) for the temp it should be okay as long as it is what he normally lives in although I keep mine at around 78F. for there diet I feed flys, crickets, and the occasional mealworm but they don't seem to like them as much. I would try to give them a cricket every once in a while if you can though.


I feed mine about every 5 days. I love his name btw!

everything you are doing sounds good to me though. also tarantula Kat on youtube as some good videos on jumping spiders if you want to check them out!
Broggy said:
is having jumping spiders as pets a thing people do? it sounds like fun.
lots of people keep them! you can actually buy them captive bred now.
 
  • Thread Starter
fishbreeeder
Member
betta06 said:
aww so cute I also have a few of them!

I keep mine in medium-large mason jars depending on their size with a paper towel as a lid (this will give more ventilation) for the temp it should be okay as long as it is what he normally lives in although I keep mine at around 78F. for there diet I feed flys, crickets, and the occasional mealworm but they don't seem to like them as much. I would try to give them a cricket every once in a while if you can though.


I feed mine about every 5 days. I love his name btw!

everything you are doing sounds good to me though. also tarantula Kat on youtube as some good videos on jumping spiders if you want to check them out!

lots of people keep them! you can actually buy them captive bred now.
TYSM! I cut a hole the size of my hand and added some windowscreen. I was hoping I could breed him-her someday! And I will def check tarantula kat out! I can give him a cricket every 1-2 weeks (we get a cricket for our rose hair at that time)
 
betta06
Member
fishbreeeder said:
TYSM! I cut a hole the size of my hand and added some windowscreen. I was hoping I could breed him-her someday! And I will def check tarantula kat out! I can give him a cricket every 1-2 weeks (we get a cricket for our rose hair at that time)
your setup sounds great! and if you don't know his/her gender yet take a look at its pedipalps if it is male it will have little balls at the end and they will be skinnier a female will have none and they will be thicker.


IMG_3565.jpg
this spider is obviously not a jumping spider, but you can easily see he is male. I find jumping spiders a lot harder to sex though so it probable wont be that easy....
 
  • Thread Starter
fishbreeeder
Member
betta06 said:
your setup sounds great! and if you don't know his/her gender yet take a look at its pedipalps if it is male it will have little balls at the end and they will be skinnier a female will have none and they will be thicker.


IMG_3565.jpg
this spider is obviously not a jumping spider, but you can easily see he is male. I find jumping spiders a lot harder to sex though so it probable wont be that easy....
He is a boy for sure!
fishbreeeder said:
He is a boy for sure!
I was wondering, could I keep him in a 5g kritter keeper?
 
  • Thread Starter
fishbreeeder
Member
I caught another boy an hour ago! Just wondering, do you breed them? I want to find a girl and breed them! Also do you have tips on finding them (the wild ones)? Kribensis27, you keep and breed jumping spiders too right?
 
  • Thread Starter
fishbreeeder
Member
fishbreeeder said:
I caught another boy an hour ago! Just wondering, do you breed them? I want to find a girl and breed them! Also do you have tips on finding them (the wild ones)? Kribensis27, you keep and breed jumping spiders too right?
betta06 said:
your setup sounds great! and if you don't know his/her gender yet take a look at its pedipalps if it is male it will have little balls at the end and they will be skinnier a female will have none and they will be thicker.


IMG_3565.jpg
this spider is obviously not a jumping spider, but you can easily see he is male. I find jumping spiders a lot harder to sex though so it probable wont be that easy....
 
  • Thread Starter
fishbreeeder
Member
Do you have any tips on finding wild ones?
 
Kribensis27
Member
fishbreeeder said:
I caught another boy an hour ago! Just wondering, do you breed them? I want to find a girl and breed them! Also do you have tips on finding them (the wild ones)? Kribensis27, you keep and breed jumping spiders too right?
Ah, sorry, missed the @. Yes, I keep and breed them. Breeding can be a tricky process, as the females sometimes eat the males without breeding. I always try to feed my girls a few hours before introducing the males. Also, make sure the area has plenty of space when breeding them, as some hiding spots will likely be useful to the male. It’s a good idea to have multiple males for each female (don’t add them at the same time), as you could very likely lose one (or multiple, for an especially murderous female). I always try to keep an eye on them after introducing the male, incase of violence. If they decide to mate, the female will typically produce an egg sac fairly soon, and the babies will hatch in anywhere from a few weeks to a few months, depending on temperature and humidity, and a bunch of other factors.

For adults, flies work well, as do crickets, waxworms, soldier fly larvae, mealworms, and dubia roach nymphs.

Baby spiders are extremely tiny, and are usually too small to eat many insects, so I usually start them on pollen. It’s high in protein for good growth, and small enough for them to consume. I just brush it off flowers with a paintbrush, before tapping it into the baby container. They eat lots of pollen when they’re still little, and will gladly take melanogaster fruit flies when big enough. If you don’t have any flowers when the babies hatch, I’ve heard of people buying bee pollen online, and crushing it into powder form for them.

Make sure to separate them from a very young age, as baby jumping spiders readily cannibalize their siblings.

Your setup sounds good, and betta06 gives some great advice.

Wild ones like to hang out in basically any random gap or crevice you can find. They also like to bask in the sun during the cooler parts of the day, so look for them in the open then.
 
  • Thread Starter
fishbreeeder
Member
:)!
Kribensis27 said:
Ah, sorry, missed the @. Yes, I keep and breed them. Breeding can be a tricky process, as the females sometimes eat the males without breeding. I always try to feed my girls a few hours before introducing the males. Also, make sure the area has plenty of space when breeding them, as some hiding spots will likely be useful to the male. It’s a good idea to have multiple males for each female, as you could very likely lose one (or multiple, for an especially murderous female. I always try to keep an eye on them after introducing the male, incase of violence. If they decide to mate, the female will typically produce an egg sac fairly soon, and the babies will hatch in anywhere from a few weeks to a few months, depending on temperature and humidity, and a bunch of other factors.

For adults, flies work well, as do crickets, waxworms, soldier fly larvae, mealworms, and dubia roach nymphs.

Baby spiders are extremely tiny, and are usually too small to eat many insects, so I usually start them on pollen. It’s high in protein for good growth, and small enough for them to consume. I just brush it off flowers with a paintbrush, before tapping it into the baby container. They eat lots of pollen when they’re still little, and will gladly take melanogaster fruit flies when big enough. If you don’t have any flowers when the babies hatch, I’ve heard of people buying bee pollen online, and crushing it into powder form for them.

Make sure to separate them from a very young age, as baby jumping spiders readily cannibalize their siblings.

Your setup sounds good, and betta06 gives some great advice.

Wild ones like to hang out in basically any random gap or crevice you can find. They also like to bask in the sun during the cooler parts of the day, so look for them in the open then.
TYSM!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 
  • Thread Starter
fishbreeeder
Member
Kribensis27 said:
Ah, sorry, missed the @. Yes, I keep and breed them. Breeding can be a tricky process, as the females sometimes eat the males without breeding. I always try to feed my girls a few hours before introducing the males. Also, make sure the area has plenty of space when breeding them, as some hiding spots will likely be useful to the male. It’s a good idea to have multiple males for each female (don’t add them at the same time), as you could very likely lose one (or multiple, for an especially murderous female). I always try to keep an eye on them after introducing the male, incase of violence. If they decide to mate, the female will typically produce an egg sac fairly soon, and the babies will hatch in anywhere from a few weeks to a few months, depending on temperature and humidity, and a bunch of other factors.

For adults, flies work well, as do crickets, waxworms, soldier fly larvae, mealworms, and dubia roach nymphs.

Baby spiders are extremely tiny, and are usually too small to eat many insects, so I usually start them on pollen. It’s high in protein for good growth, and small enough for them to consume. I just brush it off flowers with a paintbrush, before tapping it into the baby container. They eat lots of pollen when they’re still little, and will gladly take melanogaster fruit flies when big enough. If you don’t have any flowers when the babies hatch, I’ve heard of people buying bee pollen online, and crushing it into powder form for them.

Make sure to separate them from a very young age, as baby jumping spiders readily cannibalize their siblings.

Your setup sounds good, and betta06 gives some great advice.

Wild ones like to hang out in basically any random gap or crevice you can find. They also like to bask in the sun during the cooler parts of the day, so look for them in the open then.
What breeds do you have for sale? I'm interested in a female Phidippus audax! Willing to pay $30!
 
Top Bottom