wild fish???

plati221

New Member
Messages
14
Reaction score
0
Points
76
Experience
Just started
okay so i have a small river in my back yard filled with fish from small half an inch ones and foot long oones and the small ones i can cath like easily and was wondering if i should inherit some of them i know theyre not dangerous or else ill be at the hospital one biggilion time so i was woundering how many would be a appropriate tank size for them and what kinda of plants and the water exchange method i know now so let me know what i should do i know thier natural habitat is the best but i want to show my father i can take care of animals and so far my fish are great and theyre the best things in the world ya....
 

Kunsthure

Well Known Member
Messages
1,633
Reaction score
32
Points
143
Experience
Just started
In my opinion, wild animals belong in the wild. I would not capture one and make it a pet.

-Lisa
 

Lucy

Moderator
Messages
45,877
Reaction score
2,366
Points
1,383
Experience
5 to 10 years
okay so i have a small river in my back yard filled with fish from small half an inch ones and foot long oones and the small ones i can cath like easily and was wondering if i should inherit some of them i know theyre not dangerous or else ill be at the hospital one biggilion time so i was woundering how many would be a appropriate tank size for them and what kinda of plants and the water exchange method i know now so let me know what i should do i know thier natural habitat is the best but i want to show my father i can take care of animals and so far my fish are great and theyre the best things in the world ya....

Fish that are in the wild should be kept there.
If you want to show your dad that you can take care of animals, please get proper tanks for the fish you already have.
 

BennyB

Valued Member
Messages
494
Reaction score
7
Points
113
Experience
2 years
Mixing wild fish with aquarium fish can cause quite a few problems...Maybe the wild fish could bring in some crazy disease?
 

dyco619

New Member
Messages
23
Reaction score
0
Points
76
Experience
2 years
as they guys said not a good idea to catch and keep wild fish.
also they will get very stressed and prob hurt themselfs or worse in a tank,
 

BennyB

Valued Member
Messages
494
Reaction score
7
Points
113
Experience
2 years
Stressed, yes, maybe hurt themselves or other fish. They go from a huge river where they can do anything to a little tank where they can't do jack. Imagine you living in a mansion your entire life, then having to go live in a trailer. You might have some trouble adjusting.
 

jetajockey

Fishlore VIP
Messages
6,753
Reaction score
92
Points
293
Experience
More than 10 years
I don't have an issue with someone using a wild caught fish, I think most of us have done it at least once or twice, there just happened to be a middle man (LFS) taking their cut.

However in your particular case, if you want to show your level of responsibility then you should really learn more about proper fish care and get the proper equipment before you do anything else.
 

Akari_32

Fishlore Legend
Messages
15,801
Reaction score
112
Points
308
Experience
More than 10 years
the fish you're talking about are probly Tolapia. my sister caught a couple of suppossed "minnows" from a ditch by her house to keep her 2 legged turtle company, and they grew very fast and turned out to be Tolapia. they breed like guppies... thus taking over very quickly.
 

bass master

Well Known Member
Messages
529
Reaction score
19
Points
113
Experience
5 to 10 years
I have no problem with taking fish out of the wild, as jetajockey said, many aquarists have purchased wild caught fish themselves. I myself have caught a baby bluegill out of a local pond and kept it in a tank by itself for a while, as long as you do not mix wild fish with tropical fish and know exactly what species you are dealing with, you should be ok as long as you are certain you can provide adequate care. E.g. if you do not know the species you are dealing, you can end up with a larger specimen like the tilapia akari mentioned. Tilapia are easily kept in an aquarium if given enough room, but like any fish, if you decide to keep it without researching it, you could end up with a ton of problems... Releasing fish into the wild is much more dangerous than taking them out of the wild IMO. The only concern I have with taking fish out of a stream, is that in my area many streams contain cold water fish that may not be able to survive in a room temperature aquarium.. If you are just trying to prove yourself to be a responsible pet owner, you should ask for a few feeder guppies, theyre dirt cheap, raised in captivity, stay small, and simple to care for.

If you still decide to keep them in an aquarium, you absolutely need to find out what type of fish it is, without that it would be impossible to know what size aquarium to put them in etc.
 

BennyB

Valued Member
Messages
494
Reaction score
7
Points
113
Experience
2 years
^^This,
That is a very good idea, why didn't I think of that? :-\
Get a few feeder gups or minnows and take care of them, they don't usually get more than an inch or an inch and a half long, and are indeed dirt cheap.
 

gremlin

Well Known Member
Messages
3,354
Reaction score
81
Points
143
Experience
Just started
Another consideration with taking fish from the wild would be the local laws. Some native fish species are protected and it is illegal to keep them in aquariums. I would suggest you research the types of fish that are in your stream and the proper environment for them. For example, if you have mosquito fish in the stream, they happen to get up to 2 inches long, and do best in a temperate water tank with exposure to sun light at least part of the day. They feed on mosquito larvae and other wigglies in the water. Or if you happen to have large-mouth bass in the stream, they get much larger and eat a variety of bugs and smaller fish. Show your parents that you are serious about keeping fish by showing them you know how to research the species you want so you can give them the proper care.
 
Toggle Sidebar

Aquarium Calculator

Follow FishLore!





Top Bottom