Why won’t my diy co2 work?

wtusa1783

Active Member
Member
Messages
297
Reaction score
53
Last night I put 200 gallon of citric acid and 600ml of water in bottle A. In bottle B I put 200 gallon of baking soda and 200ml of water. I shook them and put the caps on. I primed it by squeezing bottle A into bottle B. After about 30 min it was still not primed and was only half the pressure needed. I opened the cap and released the pressure and started again. It eventually built up pressure. I hooked it up to the diffuser and nothing. What did I do wrong?
 

Joshaeus

Well Known
Member
Messages
1,399
Reaction score
716
I have little experience with this kind of DIY CO2, but I did try it once with similarly poor success (granted, I did not follow the directions very well...). I am currently experimenting with yeast reactors instead (which have given me the opposite problem...far TOO potent! :D Good thing I experimented with it on a tank with no livestock or plants). Maybe someone else can help you with this?
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #3
OP
W

wtusa1783

Active Member
Member
Messages
297
Reaction score
53
Joshaeus said:
I have little experience with this kind of DIY CO2, but I did try it once with similarly poor success (granted, I did not follow the directions very well...). I am currently experimenting with yeast reactors instead (which have given me the opposite problem...far TOO potent! :D Good thing I experimented with it on a tank with no livestock or plants). Maybe someone else can help you with this?
What is your method?
 

Joshaeus

Well Known
Member
Messages
1,399
Reaction score
716
wtusa1783 said:
What is your method?
With yeast reactors? Per liter bottle, I add 13 tablespoons sugar, 1 quart water, 1/8th tsp baking soda, 1/4th tsp corn starch, 1/2 tsp yeast, and one fish food pellet, and heat this to the high 70's fahrenheit by placing it in a small container filled with water and equipped with an aquarium heater (temperature has a huge effect on yeast CO2 production). Even a reactor half this size is producing FAR too much CO2 for my 5 gallon...the drop checker is very yellow and PH is 1.2-1.5 orders of magnitude lower than it is degassed (the ideal is about 1 ph).

Side note...if using a diffuser, make sure it is in the downwash of the filter output (where the outgoing water hits the opposite tank wall). This will blow the CO2 mist around the tank so long as the flow is strong enough (and you have mist and not simply bubbles). From what I've read, HOB filters work poorly for distributing CO2 due to their highly variable flow patterns, so I use internal filters currently.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #5
OP
W

wtusa1783

Active Member
Member
Messages
297
Reaction score
53
Joshaeus said:
With yeast reactors? Per liter bottle, I add 13 tablespoons sugar, 1 quart water, 1/8th tsp baking soda, 1/4th tsp corn starch, 1/2 tsp yeast, and one fish food pellet, and heat this to the high 70's fahrenheit by placing it in a small container filled with water and equipped with an aquarium heater (temperature has a huge effect on yeast CO2 production). Even a reactor half this size is producing FAR too much CO2 for my 5 gallon...the drop checker is very yellow and PH is 1.2-1.5 orders of magnitude lower than it is degassed (the ideal is about 1 ph).

Side note...if using a diffuser, make sure it is in the downwash of the filter output (where the outgoing water hits the opposite tank wall). This will blow the CO2 mist around the tank so long as the flow is strong enough (and you have mist and not simply bubbles). From what I've read, HOB filters work poorly for distributing CO2 due to their highly variable flow patterns, so I use internal filters currently.
So I have the kit for two 2 liter bottles. Could I do this mix with the kit I have. The kit I have is meant for the citric acid and baking soda one
 

Joshaeus

Well Known
Member
Messages
1,399
Reaction score
716
My setups consist of a bottle, one of those special bottle caps with ports for tubing, CO2 tubing, sometimes a bubble counter, and a diffuser. One of the ports has a check valve pointing towards the bottle to prevent CO2 from escaping; the other goes to the bubble counter and diffuser. I change the bottles once a week for consistency's sake...unstable CO2 levels encourage algae.
 

New Threads

Similar Threads

Follow FishLore!

FishLore on Social Media

Online statistics

Members online
220
Guests online
2,884
Total visitors
3,104

Aquarium Photo Contests

Aquarium Calculator

Top Bottom