White spots on Gill plate and sexing question

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blueiristyson

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Here are my two goldfish.One is a comet with long fins that is about a year old and the other one is a common that is about 5 years old.

I rescued the common goldfish about a year ago. It had fin rot and tail rot. I medicated it and its fins are growing back nicely.

I took a picture of my 5 year old common and noticed white spots on its gill plate. The spots are on both sides. You can see the spots on the gill plate in the picture I provided.

I took a picture of my 1 year old comet also. It doesn't have any spots on its gill plate.

The comet chases the common sometimes.It looks like they are playing "follow the leader". Nothing aggressive, just looks like they are playing.

Can someone please try and tell me the sex of my two fish from the two pictures I provided?
 

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A Sneaky Fatman

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I recently discovered these spots on my fantail and was informed they are breeding spots, and that males get them when the conditions are right.

I'm not an expert on goldfish but if one has them and the other doesn't, does that mean one is a male and the other a female?

This is the forum thread, , see if your spots look like mine did.
 
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blueiristyson

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I would think that if one had spots it would be a male and the other didnt it would be female,however, My comet without the spots is only a year old. Even if he was a male I don't think he is mature enough to get the spots yet.That's my guess.

I was told you could tell the sex of a younger fish by their fin pattern but I don't know how to tell
 

gremlin

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In my opinion, there is not much distinction between "comet" and "common". I feel they have been interbred so much that there really isn't much difference between the two anymore.

That said, looking at the fins of your two goldies, I would say that the fish in the first picture with the longer more deeply forked tail is a male. The fish in the third picture with the shorter more rounded fins is a female. If the second picture shows who is always chasing who, then that confirms it to me. The male will chase the female, bumping into her sides and belly, to try to stimulate her to lay eggs. They prefer a mossy or weedy area to release their eggs. She will release eggs and the male will follow and release sperm. Lots of thrashing and splashing in the shallows where there is moss or plants to "hold" the eggs. As for the breeding tubercles, They are most prominent on the males, but I have had some of my females get faint white spots also. Usually the older females.

Oh, and another note on the "common" vs "comet". When I have asked at the store about the common vs comet price (comets cost more), I was told by the employees that "the comets are the ones with the long tails". So, according to the employees, all the males are comets and all the females are commons. Go figure. I even had one manager tell me that they get them all from the same breeder who says that he gets commons and comets from the same spawn because one parent is a common and one is a comet. This same "breeder" told the manager that he had to do that because when he put two commons together or two comets together he didn't get any babies at all. So now he has one of each in each of his breeding tanks. It was so ridiculous that I laughed out loud right there. The manager asked why I was laughing. I explained to him that all of his "comets" were males and all of his "commons" were females. The he started laughing.
 
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