which is the most intelligent fish????????

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Neville

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;Dwhich is the most intelligent fish of all?
i have some options......

1. Goldfish
2. Oscars
3. Betta Fish 
4. Guppies    or
5. the fish that u have in mind (please share with us; which fish do u think is the most intelligent fish and why?)


i'll go for goldfish....................because they recognise me and beg for food whenevr i approach the tank. they even recognise my voice i think.
 

Tom

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I think they all are intelligent because for my 3 tanks whenever I walk up to the tank o look in,, all the fish think it is time for food.
Tom
 

tan.b

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same here. as soon as i go to the lid of the tank, or when my 4yr old son (who actually feeds them with my help) they all come to the front glass (except the pleco and loach as they're busy cleaning or hiding!! - they have work to do!!! )

i got the rainbow fish off my sister as she was getting rid of all her fish and she said the rainbow fish was called "stupid fish". not sure why he got that name :-\, but i'm sure she had her reasons!!

Tan
 

Jimold

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I would have to go with oscars... I have never seen a fish that not only recognized me (the hand that feeds), but would come to the tank for my brother and freinds that visited often, and yet hid from obvous strangers.
 

tan.b

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Jim said:
I would have to go with oscars... I have never seen a fish that not only recognized me (the hand that feeds), but would come to the tank for my brother and freinds that visited often, and yet hid from obvous strangers. 
cool! how cute is that!!
 

Jimold

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I do miss him, he was awesome. I could also hand feed him, and get him to jump more than 6" high out of the water to grab a worm. Oh, and he was also the most curious fish I ever owned. He would spend hours checking out anything new in the tank. Definitly an intelligent fish!!! when I have the $$$ to get another really big tank I plan on making it a oscar tank.
 

tan.b

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good idea!!!! good luck. thing is, your next oscar has a lot to live up to!!!!!!! hope he doesnt disappoint
Tan
 

inuyasha_lover_21

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Other: my pirahna I could put my hand in and feed him. I could move things in the tank without getting bit but hen my friends come over he would try to bite them.

RIP lil buddy :'(
 

Jimold

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I would love to try raising a Parana, but they're illegal in Florida. Seems some people had a bad habit of letting them go, and down here, they thrive!!! Makes for one **** of a water trap on the golf course!!!
 

FishFyer

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I also think the oscar is... i only had mine for about a week and he had already learned to jump out of the water for food.
 

wolfman21

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I have to say guppy because they recognize when meal time is. They will approach the top of the water when I am about to feed. They also recognize me when I am looking at them or watching them. They trust me when I am cleaning the tank and have my hand in the water, they won't flee like the rest of the fish. The male is quite different, though. He has pretty much one thing on his mind at all times: mating.
 

tan.b

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wolfman21 said:
I have to say guppy because they recognize when meal time is. They will approach the top of the water when I am about to feed. They also recognize me when I am looking at them or watching them. They trust me when I am cleaning the tank and have my hand in the water, they won't flee like the rest of the fish. The male is quite different, though. He has pretty much one thing on his mind at all times: mating.
i like guppies - can you tell?!!! those and the danios are the boldest in my tank and will try and get in the test tube when i'm testing the water!! the male guppies will come the side of the tank when i'm sat close to the tank. the girls are too obsessed looking for scraps of food scavenging! one of my boys, the blue one is extremely randy at the moment. none of the boys were bothering the girls until today when all 3 boys were chasing this poor girly guppy, eventually 2 of them gave up, but the blue one.......he wouldnt give up until she hid in a plant, then he went off and found another girl to chase!!! he doesnt seem to realise his work is done....they are all preg anyway!!!!!! luckily the other 2 boys arent as obsessed!!
Tan
 

dsteamn

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It doesn't look like anyone has posted anything for salt water, so let me take a stab at it. I have a mated pair of maroon clown fish that host in a pink bubble tip anemone. Mama clown is always cleaning the sand off with her tail in front of the anemone, bringing it food, and chasing other fish away from it she feels may be a threat. At night, she sleeps on it, but during the day, she hangs out in a cave for the most part and stands guard over Daddy clown -to make sure he is doing what he's suppose to. (He has anemone duty during the day.) If a rock falls or a hermit crab gets too close for comfort, she will pick it up and move it out of the way. If its too heavy, she hits it with her nose and pushes until it is a safe distance away. For those of you who don't know, they develop symbiotic relationships with each other. The clown fish take care of the anemone's needs, and the anemone helps to increase the slime coat on the fish and provide safety from other fish since they will be stung, or possibly eaten, by it if they get too close to it.

She's also very precocious. I like to put pieces of fish down in the tank on a string and watch the antics. She will grab the string and pull the fish into her cave so no one else can get to it. Then she guards it, but doesn't eat much of it. She just doesn't want anyone else to get any. She will eat out of my hand and follow my fingers across the tank. If I draw circles on the glass, she will swim around clockwise and follow me.

I have 7 tanks totalling 400 gallons, but my 75 gallon reef tank is definitely a different dynamic from my Freshwater tanks.

Happy fish keeping.
 

tan.b

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dsteamn said:
It doesn't look like anyone has posted anything for salt water, so let me take a stab at it.  I have a mated pair of maroon clown fish that host in a pink bubble tip anemone.  Mama clown is always cleaning the sand off with her tail in front of the anemone, bringing it food, and chasing other fish away from it she feels may be a threat.  At night, she sleeps on it, but during the day, she hangs out in a cave for the most part and stands guard over Daddy clown -to make sure he is doing what he's suppose to.  (He has anemone duty during the day.)  If a rock falls or a hermit crab gets too close for comfort, she will pick it up and move it out of the way.  If its too heavy, she hits it with her nose and pushes until it is a safe distance away.  For those of you who don't know, they develop symbiotic relationships with each other.  The clown fish take care of the anemone's needs, and the anemone helps to increase the slime coat on the fish and provide safety from other fish since they will be stung, or possibly eaten, by it if they get too close to it.

She's also very precocious.  I like to put pieces of fish down in the tank on a string and watch the antics.  She will grab the string and pull the fish into her cave so no one else can get to it.  Then she guards it, but doesn't eat much of it.  She just doesn't want anyone else to get any.  She will eat out of my hand and follow my fingers across the tank.  If I draw circles on the glass, she will swim around clockwise and follow me.

I have 7 tanks totalling 400 gallons, but my 75 gallon reef tank is definitely a different dynamic from my Freshwater tanks.

Happy fish keeping.
that sounds great!!! i'd spend all day watching them and not getting any work done!!!! i envy you with that tank!!!!!!
keep up the good work!!
Tan
 

fugi14

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I'd say bettas, they are smarter than you'd think.
 
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Neville

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yeah, one of my friends has a betta, once he put a mirror against the aquarium glass and seeing its own reflection the male betta thought it was another male and he got very angry and furious..........cool
 

Jimold

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I've seen people do the mirror trick with betta's before. You just have to be careful not to do it too much or it'll freak out and hurt itself smashing into the glass...
 

rainman

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I believe in my opinion that the Angel fish is one of the most intelligent fish i have owned.
 

COBettaCouple

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i'd have to go with Bettas, they're by far the smartest fish we have had.
 

Jimold

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rainman said:
I believe in my opinion that the Angel fish is one of the most intelligent fish i have owned.
Oh, I can definitly agree here... but I think I'd expand it to all cichlids, at least south american cichlids. I've never had african's, so i can't speak for them. But I've had Oscars, Dempseys, and Firemouths and I've seen the same behaviour in all of them: an amazing curiousity of their surroundings both inside and OUTSIDE the tank, phenomonal parenting skills, and even the ability to recognize their owner from strangers (especiallly oscars). You can also train some to handfeed, and I had my oscar trained to jump a good 6" to snatch a nice juicey worm from my hand.
South American cichlids are definitly one of the most intelligent species I've ever had.



Now, having written all that, I am seriously debating trying my hand at a saltwater tank next. I was thinking of getting a larger sized biocube and maybe something small at first. I am now seriously leaning towards a pair of maroon clown fish...lol!
 
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