where did albino fish come from?

Discussion in 'More Freshwater Aquarium Topics' started by ILikeFishies, Dec 29, 2012.

  1. ILikeFishies

    ILikeFishies Valued Member Member

    ok i looked through the forum, i couldnt find any answer to my question, so i was just wondering, exactly how did the first albino fish come about? Lets just take guppies for example, i see lots of those expensive fancy albino guppies in some fish stores that cost like $30 , how exactly did they get the first albino o_O (not much of a science person)

    Like if we were to just breed alot of guppies would one of them eventually turn up albino?
     
  2. Y

    Yeoy Well Known Member Member

    It is about genetic difference. One is born albino (like someone really tall or with an extra toe) and then they separate it. And breed it with other different ones. Then overtime those fish have all the albino genes, and only produce albino fry. It is the same as a red or green guppy.

    I hope that explains it simply. It is a very fascinating process if you look into it :)
     
  3. OP
    OP
    ILikeFishies

    ILikeFishies Valued Member Member

    ooo :O, so its basically just luck if one of your fry turns up albino?
    I've seen my fish give birth to many many fry, not one have i seen albino xD.. infact my guppy gave birth yesterday to conjoined fry, 2 fry were stuck together by the tummy. Not sure what happened to them because when i came back, they were gone o_O. So either they separated or the mummy ate them?. I didnt see any dead fry either, so thats a mystery xD
     




  4. Mer-max

    Mer-max Well Known Member Member

    Selective breeding. Like with dogs.
     
  5. pirahnah3

    pirahnah3 Fishlore VIP Member

    Yes Albinos come from selective breeding once the gene shows itself.

    The fish are completely natural just selectively bred.
     
  6. OP
    OP
    ILikeFishies

    ILikeFishies Valued Member Member

    cool :D. But i've always wondered why they were more expensive than the normal ones =/. I mean they're still the same as the other fish. Like i noticed albino corydoras are more expensive than the normal ones.
     
  7. Y

    Yeoy Well Known Member Member

    Well because they are rarer, and harder to breed basically. It is harder because if you breed a normal one with an albino one the normal genetics will takeover again and you will lose the albino line. The cost essentially reflects the effort put in to get the fish in the beginning.
     
  8. OP
    OP
    ILikeFishies

    ILikeFishies Valued Member Member

    oh i see :O speaking of albinos. i've seen all sorts of albino species, but i've never seen an albino platy o.o
     
  9. pirahnah3

    pirahnah3 Fishlore VIP Member

    I actually find around me that albinos are priced about the same at allthe stores, with my LFS to be the exception he gets in albino cory's at such a cheap price! usually $1 less or more per fish than the other cory's
     
  10. Y

    Yeoy Well Known Member Member

    Well platys come in a whole lot of colours already, so it would be harder to notice fish with albino characteristics than say a bronze corydora. But realistically, it takes one (or more) people with time, patience, resources and a love for the hobby to settle down and breed out a colour line. It is the same with all the varities of platy, molly and guppy etc that you see today. Same with angels and everything else. They have been refined by a caring individual.

    @Pirahna I think once something (i.e. cories) becomes established as a fish, as they have been for many years now, there are enough albinos out there that the cost goes down because they become very common. It is when they are new that they are harder/rarer/more expensive to get.
     
  11. OP
    OP
    ILikeFishies

    ILikeFishies Valued Member Member

    wow, i can't imagine how many years it must have taken them to produce such amazing results o.o!
     




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