Where Can I Get Info About Blue Nebula Guppies?

12Cin12

Does anyone know where I can get info on blue nebula burst guppies? I purchased 3 pairs from Trins Aquatics. I chose this strain because the females are just as beautiful as the males.
One male died (sad) and now I have three females and two males.
The thing is - I don’t know what they are supposed to look like. Some have spots on their tails and some don’t. Should I even be worrying about genetics? I like blue guppies and have thought of just buying the prettiest blues I can, but I don’t want to mess up this line.
I’m looking for info on guppy strains. Believe it or not google is not much help.
 

Coradee

emeraldking knows livebearers very well, he may be able to help
 

coralbandit

Try searching Pete Mang ..Lotsoffish was his sellers name on Aquabid..
He created the Steel Nebula .
I had them years ago .They don't throw consistant color or patterns .The mosaic tail is the signature I believe ?
 

emeraldking

The blue nebula burst guppies don't have a real consistancy in passing through the same pattern on both genders. In order to have a more steady pattern, one needs to cull in every single generation. On a distance they look very similar but when you look closer there are differences.
I've seen several on shows in Holland and Germany.
 

12Cin12

Try searching Pete Mang ..Lotsoffish was his sellers name on Aquabid..
He created the Steel Nebula .
I had them years ago .They don't throw consistant color or patterns .The mosaic tail is the signature I believe ?
Thank you so much - this is very helpful!
 

12Cin12

The blue nebula burst guppies don't have a real consistancy in passing through the same pattern on both genders. In order to have a more steady pattern, one needs to cull in every single generation. On a distance they look very similar but when you look closer there are differences.
I've seen several on shows in Holland and Germany.
I chose this strain because the females are so pretty. Is this unique to blue nebula strain, or is this fairly common in other guile’s? This is more important to me than pattern.
 

coralbandit

They will shoot different colors like red or blue and you need to choose to breed the color you prefer the most .
I believe they will fall back to red if not worked to specific color like blue .
 

12Cin12

They will shoot different colors like red or blue and you need to choose to breed the color you prefer the most .
I believe they will fall back to red if not worked to specific color like blue .
Ok! This is the info I need - AND explains the bit of orange in them. I posted a pic next to my tiny BR named Clyde. Sorry about the quality - guppies are fast!
 

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coralbandit

Nice blue !
Separate the other colors so you can be assured to get more blues ..They will still throw all colors but you should get more blues that way..
The reason I stopped breeding them is everyone is different ..Hard to sell a fish that looks different every time especially when people see a picture and say I want the blue one which was one out of 6 fish in picture !
 

aae0130

Those guppies are beautiful.
 

12Cin12

Nice blue !
Separate the other colors so you can be assured to get more blues ..They will still throw all colors but you should get more blues that way..
The reason I stopped breeding them is everyone is different ..Hard to sell a fish that looks different every time especially when people see a picture and say I want the blue one which was one out of 6 fish in picture !
Yes, I can see how that would be frustrating! But they are so pretty, I wouldn't mind if I just kept them for myself.
 

emeraldking

It's tricky to keep only the blues when you like to breed those blues. It's a bit similar to breeding grass guppies.
If you'd like to have a majority of blue offspring, you need to breed a blue male to a red female ( and not to a blue female). Same goes, if you'd like to have a majority of red offspring, you need to have a red male and a blue female.

It's tricky if you're not aware of this combination. If you've never bred guppies like these, you'd probably have the urge to match both male and female which are phenotypically the same. In this case, you should match those genders genotypically in order to have an offspring with the wished coloration.

Breeding blue to blue will have an offspring with more red and red with some blue coloration. Breeding red to red will end up with an offspring of blue coloration with some red. And if you keep crossing them like this, more variety will occur in the folllowing generations of offspring.

But I do get it when people are dissapointed when the offspring grow up and show other coloration or even pattern than expected. For most people who are a guppy breeding novice will have the urge to match a male and a female with the same phenotype. And that doesn't always work to be honest...

A lot of people make also the same mistake with moscows. If you'd like to cross a moscow (and of all the moscows, I'm specifically referring to black, blue, purple and green moscow) with another kind of guppy but with the intention to have a black coloration on the male offspring's body, they tend to use a male moscow. But in that case (depending on the genetics of the female used), the male offspring won't have a full dark colored body. Instead the dark coloration won't show up or only on the head and/or shoulders. You need a female moscow in order to have full dark colored male offspring. For it's the female moscow that carries the dominant moscow gene eventhough phenotypical she will show less dark coloration in comparison to a male moscow.
So, note: Phenotype does not always match the genotype.

In my former reply, I was mentioning to cull. And if you read it well, I was referring to the pattern and not the coloration.
 

12Cin12

It's tricky to keep only the blues when you like to breed those blues. It's a bit similar to breeding grass guppies.
If you'd like to have a majority of blue offspring, you need to breed a blue male to a red female ( and not to a blue female). Same goes, if you'd like to have a majority of red offspring, you need to have a red male and a blue female.

It's tricky if you're not aware of this combination. If you've never bred guppies like these, you'd probably have the urge to match both male and female which are phenotypically the same. In this case, you should match those genders genotypically in order to have an offspring with the wished coloration.

Breeding blue to blue will have an offspring with more red and red with some blue coloration. Breeding red to red will end up with an offspring of blue coloration with some red. And if you keep crossing them like this, more variety will occur in the folllowing generations of offspring.

But I do get it when people are dissapointed when the offspring grow up and show other coloration or even pattern than expected. For most people who are a guppy breeding novice will have the urge to match a male and a female with the same phenotype. And that doesn't always work to be honest...

A lot of people make also the same mistake with moscows. If you'd like to cross a moscow (and of all the moscows, I'm specifically referring to black, blue, purple and green moscow) with another kind of guppy but with the intention to have a black coloration on the male offspring's body, they tend to use a male moscow. But in that case (depending on the genetics of the female used), the male offspring won't have a full dark colored body. Instead the dark coloration won't show up or only on the head and/or shoulders. You need a female moscow in order to have full dark colored male offspring. For it's the female moscow that carries the dominant moscow gene eventhough phenotypical she will show less dark coloration in comparison to a male moscow.
So, note: Phenotype does not always match the genotype.

In my former reply, I was mentioning to cull. And if you read it well, I was referring to the pattern and not the coloration.
Thank you! I bookmarked this. Let’s see if I remember genetics from back when I bred canaries-
Phenotype - traits showing
Genotype- traits that are carried but not necessarily showing.
And you are also saying that the babies will be the color of the male because the color is sex-linked to the male chromosome? ?
Feel free to correct me!
It’s sad for newbies because these guppies are sold as a set. Your info has been very helpful and shows how much work I’d have to do just to get blue guppies!
Since my guppies are the same phenotype will their babies be weaker?
 

emeraldking

Thank you! I bookmarked this. Let’s see if I remember genetics from back when I bred canaries-
Phenotype - traits showing
Genotype- traits that are carried but not necessarily showing.
And you are also saying that the babies will be the color of the male because the color is sex-linked to the male chromosome? ?
Feel free to correct me!
It’s sad for newbies because these guppies are sold as a set. Your info has been very helpful and shows how much work I’d have to do just to get blue guppies!
Since my guppies are the same phenotype will their babies be weaker?
It's not a general rule that the color of future offspring is sex-linked to the male chromosome. It only goes for certain traits of certain strains. For there are sufficient strains where the coloration is sex-linked to the female chromosome. But in general it comes down to the genetics of the male and the female used. In order to create guppies with specific desired traits, the ideal situation would be to have knowledge of the genetics of both genders and the following genders used if traits of other strains are to be added to accomplish the final result of a new guppy strain.
And don't forget whether a gene is dominant or recessive or even triple recessive and so on... All details...

I do hear it from time to time at some lfs's when some customer is asking a staff member whether the male or female guppy is responsible for the coloration of the new offspring. I do hear quite often that just the male is responsible for the coloration. This is incorrect information. It really depends on the genetics of both genders that will be used as a breeding pair.

Guppies of the same phenotype doesn't mean that their offspring will be weaker. But I'm not sure what you exactly mean by "weaker". Weaker of coloration or physical weaker?

And always use virgin females to avoid a longer process. But to be honest, to create an almost 100% (preferably a genuine 100%) pure breeding new guppy strain, you'll need a serious time investment.

Newbies may like the F1 offspring of a cross. Many make the mistake to cross siblings, which makes the variety of further offspring only bigger. So, that creating a stable new line in a short time won't be possible. I'd prefer with the F0 to use at least 2 or 3 similar breeding pairs. And cross the male fry of one breeding pair with the female offspring of one of the other breeding pairs. Or depending of what trait(s) you'd like to pass on from the father, to cross a daughter with the father. Breeding a son to a mother is of no use. For she'll be still carrying sperm packages of the F0 male. Inbreeding won't harm the bloodline for a couple of generations. It's even quite normal to do so the enhance certain traits of any new strain of whatever species (so, this doesn't only go for livebearers but also for other kinds of species). But be alert to add new blood from time to time.
 

12Cin12

Thank you! Yes I was referring to their health / I understand by now that breeding for color is quite involved!
This is just the info I needed - thank you for taking the time to educate on this!!
 

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