When to separate Msobo Deep mother from fry?

CharlieJ

Hello everyone! My Msobo Deep has started spitting fry this morning. How exciting! This is the first batch of fry and the mother has been holding since about the 6th. I have a few questions...
1. How long do I leave the mother in the tank with the fry? She was moved to a 20 long by herself about 2 weeks ago.
2. I have a breeder box hanging on the tank, should I put the mother in it or the fry? I was going to keep her separated an additional week or so to allow her to eat and regain her strength before putting her back in the main tank.
3. I have Hikari First Bites to feed the fry is there anything additional I need to add to their diet for the first couple weeks? I dont have a way to do baby brine shrimp.
4. Any other suggestions to ensure they fry stay healthy?

Pic of some of the fry and the tank setup attached.

Thanks!
 

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MacZ

1. How long do I leave the mother in the tank with the fry? She was moved to a 20 long by herself about 2 weeks ago.
Give her a week after she doesn't take the fish into her mouth in "dangerous" moments.
As soon as she is returned to the main tank she will get a lot of stress so it's good she gets a break.
2. I have a breeder box hanging on the tank, should I put the mother in it or the fry?
Neither.
3. I have Hikari First Bites to feed the fry is there anything additional I need to add to their diet for the first couple weeks? I dont have a way to do baby brine shrimp.
Any chance of feeding frozen cyclops? Why no artemia nauplii? Those are essential in breeding.
4. Any other suggestions to ensure they fry stay healthy?
Waterchanges. 25% a day. And move them to a 150 liter minimum growout tank when they reach about 4cm.
 

CharlieJ

Give her a week after she doesn't take the fish into her mouth in "dangerous" moments.
As soon as she is returned to the main tank she will get a lot of stress so it's good she gets a break.

Neither.

Any chance of feeding frozen cyclops? Why no artemia nauplii? Those are essential in breeding.

Waterchanges. 25% a day. And move them to a 150 liter minimum growout tank when they reach about 4cm.
Thanks MarkZ.
I can run up to the LFS to see if they have the Cyclops and I dont have a shrimp hatchery. Guess I could see if they have one of those also. I wasnt planning on breeding, it just happened so I decided to see if I could raise them successfully rather than leaving them in the main tank and letting nature take its course. Water changes daily... got it! 4cm=1.5 inches,150 liter=40 gal... not sure where I would put another 40 gallon tank! Maybe at 1.5 inches, I can move a few into the main (40 gal) tank and take the rest to the LFS.
 

MacZ

I wasnt planning on breeding, it just happened so I decided to see if I could raise them successfully rather than leaving them in the main tank and letting nature take its course.
In that case only get cyclops and don't bother with the hatchery. Do exactly that in the future.

Maybe at 1.5 inches, I can move a few into the main (40 gal) tank
No chance, they will not survive. Take them all to the store. A 40 is also far too small for adults of these fish except in a species tank for breeding purposes. Any chance of getting 450 liter (150x50 footprint) or more setup? That would be the minimum tank size for Malawis.
 

CharlieJ

In that case only get cyclops and don't bother with the hatchery. Do exactly that in the future.


No chance, they will not survive. Take them all to the store. A 40 is also far too small for adults of these fish except in a species tank for breeding purposes. Any chance of getting 450 liter (150x50 footprint) or more setup? That would be the minimum tank size for Malawis.
450 liter? That's a 120 gallons. Everything I read before setting up the 40g said 40g was the bare minimum for dwarf mbuna, but it would work and to slightly over stock it to keep aggression down some. Also a ratio of 1/m to 3-4/f was suggested. I started it up 6-8 months ago with 12 unsexed juveniles and ended up with 3/m and 9/f so I thought I was good, but have been trying to find a couple more females to swap out one of my males.
I do have plans for a 150-180 gallon to move them to, but it's likely months down the road.
 

MacZ

Everything I read before setting up the 40g said 40g was the bare minimum for dwarf mbuna, but it would work and to slightly over stock it to keep aggression down some. Also a ratio of 1/m to 3-4/f was suggested.
I have kept and bred this fish for a decade. The infos you quote are 1990s standard. Nowerdays these conditions are simply not up to date anymore. But to be fair: Half the world sees these fish as a commodity so people haven't moved on from the stone age of fish keeping yet.
Also a sex ratio of 4-5m to 6-10f would be appropriate.

I do have plans for a 150-180 gallon to move them to, but it's likely months down the road.
Then I just hope you have no losses until then.
 

CharlieJ

All points noted and I really do appreciate your insight. I will get some cyclops for the fry, keep the water changed at a rate of 25% daily and take the fry to the LFS once they grow enough in the current 20 long tank (more store credit towards the 180 gallon). I will also return the mother to the main tank a week after she stops sucking fry back to her mouth.
Thanks again for all the help!
 

MacZ

You‘re welcome!

I hope you have a long time of fun with these fish, you have a subspecies there that is not that often kept, so it's even more important to tailor the tank to the fish. ;)
 

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