When does my tank become overstocked? Help 

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Bobby Callaghan

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At the moment I have 4 neon dwarf rainbowfish and 1 sucker fish, 4 corys and 5 neon tetras.
I know there are rules to how many fish you can have.
I have a 90 litre (25g) tank.
When does my tank become overstocked?
If I can hpw many more neons can I add?
Thank you.
 

FishGalaxy

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I like using to add the exact species of my fish.. if that sucker fish you have is a common pleco. your already overstocked and need to get him a big tank.
 

Meenu

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aqadvisor is a good tool for determining bioload. It also alerts to you some compatibillity problems (the creator of the site updates constantly, so it is a work in progress)

However, it should not be used as an exclusive tool in determining stock for your tank. Nothing beats researching each fish variety by reading profiles, and of course, asking experienced fishkeepers for opinions (a lot of the people on this forum qualify).

There are many issues to consider - tank size, adult size of the fish, bioload, territorial issues, male vs. female ratios, aggression, how fast the fish swim, etc.

What kind of pleco do you have? Common plecos belong in huge tanks.
 

harpua2002

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Meenu said:
aqadvisor is a good tool for determining bioload. It also alerts to you some compatibillity problems (the creator of the site updates constantly, so it is a work in progress)

However, it should not be used as an exclusive tool in determining stock for your tank. Nothing beats researching each fish variety by reading profiles, and of course, asking experienced fishkeepers for opinions (a lot of the people on this forum qualify).

There are many issues to consider - tank size, adult size of the fish, bioload, territorial issues, male vs. female ratios, aggression, how fast the fish swim, etc.

What kind of pleco do you have? Common plecos belong in huge tanks.
+1.

Just wanted to add, though, that "sucker fish" could refer to anything from a pleco to CAE to hillstream loach. Yay common names.
 

Meenu

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true, I have heard someone at the LFS calling otos that too...
 
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Bobby Callaghan

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it is not an oto nor a plec it is a sucking loach
 

sirdarksol

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Going to voice my opposition to the aqadvisor suggestion. There are so many errors with it, and it's far from complete (and always will be, there are just too many aquarium fish to include them all).

First of all, identify the fish. You've got the dwarf rainbowfish, the neons, and the cories. That's good. Now we've got the suckermouth. If you're not sure what kind of fish it is, you could post a pic and likely get an ID on it.
Edit: Sucking loach? I presume that's the name the pet store gave for the "Chinese algae eater," Gyrinocheilus aymonieri. Is this correct? If so, it gets too big for the aquarium, and might get belligerent with your other fish as it grows older.

Then, work on making sure you've got a full school for the schooling fish. For the rainbows, do you have all male, all female, or mixed gender? If all female or all male, they would appreciate one more of that gender.If you have mixed, you'll want to add one or two to keep the ratios close to equal.
You're good on the neons and cories for now. In the long run, you may decide that there is swimming room, and that you can handle the water changes to add some more neons.

Once you've got your aquarium comfortable for its inhabitants, then pay attention to nitrate levels, how the fish get along, that sort of thing. At the same time, continue reading about the fish you have. You'll eventually get a feel for how well stocked the aquarium is, and will be able to make an educated decision regarding adding more fish to the tank.
 

funkman262

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as soon as I saw aqadvisor mentioned I KNEW sirdarksol would get involved lol
 
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Bobby Callaghan

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I looked at aqadvisor and when it gave me results I knew they were wrong.
It is NOT a chinese alge eater. It will get to 20cm it is peaceful and it cleans my tank. its a sucker fish. I have a thread on the forum under 'loaches' on what it is.
 

harpua2002

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I checked out your thread. If the fish is the same as the fish in the link that Butterfly posted, it is indeed a Chinese algae eater.
 

Red1313

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harpua2002 said:
I checked out your thread. If the fish is the same as the fish in the link that Butterfly posted, it is indeed a Chinese algae eater.
I was just going to say that lol
 

ppate1977

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Commonly known as a hillstream loach. I have one and he's great.
 

sirdarksol

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Bobby Callaghan said:
I looked at aqadvisor and when it gave me results I knew they were wrong.
It's good that you're looking at stocking critically. Too many people just go with what looks cool or seems easy (I know I did).

It is NOT a chinese alge eater. It will get to 20cm it is peaceful and it cleans my tank. its a sucker fish. I have a thread on the forum under 'loaches' on what it is.
I'm presuming that the info here is based on what the pet store told you. A lot of people have been told a lot of garbage by pet store owners. 20cm is within the realms of where a Chinese algae eater will stop growing. It's not surprising that it's peaceful now. It's a juvenile. Juvie CAEs are really peaceful and eat plenty of algae. It's only as they grow older that they become belligerent and may stop eating algae (though some people have had luck keeping them eating algae in large enough tanks).
I doubt it's actually a loach. There aren't any loaches that I know of that have a true sucker-type mouth.

But whatever the case is, at 20cm, it's going to create a lot of waste, and is going to end up being pretty uncomfortable in a tank that small. My suggestion would be to take it back to the pet store. If you want algae eaters, I would suggest otos (though you should wait until your aquarium has been running for several months before adding otos).
 

harpua2002

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"Sucking loach" is a common name that lfs's use for all kinds of stuff. CAE's and hillstream loaches (although VERY different fish) are commonly referred to as "sucking loaches". Ah, the beauty of common names....
 

funkman262

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sirdarksol said:
Going to voice my opposition to the aqadvisor suggestion. There are so many errors with it, and it's far from complete (and always will be, there are just too many aquarium fish to include them all).

First of all, identify the fish. You've got the dwarf rainbowfish, the neons, and the cories. That's good. Now we've got the suckermouth. If you're not sure what kind of fish it is, you could post a pic and likely get an ID on it.
Edit: Sucking loach? I presume that's the name the pet store gave for the "Chinese algae eater," Gyrinocheilus aymonieri. Is this correct? If so, it gets too big for the aquarium, and might get belligerent with your other fish as it grows older.

Then, work on making sure you've got a full school for the schooling fish. For the rainbows, do you have all male, all female, or mixed gender? If all female or all male, they would appreciate one more of that gender.If you have mixed, you'll want to add one or two to keep the ratios close to equal.
You're good on the neons and cories for now. In the long run, you may decide that there is swimming room, and that you can handle the water changes to add some more neons.

Once you've got your aquarium comfortable for its inhabitants, then pay attention to nitrate levels, how the fish get along, that sort of thing. At the same time, continue reading about the fish you have. You'll eventually get a feel for how well stocked the aquarium is, and will be able to make an educated decision regarding adding more fish to the tank.
Funny enough, I just ran his equipment and fish in aqadvisor, and it pretty much gives the same information as you just said...get rid of the CAE due to size and aggression and add a couple more rainbowfish lol but I'm in no way suggesting to use aqadvisor as your only research tool ...
 

sirdarksol

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funkman262 said:
Funny enough, I just ran his equipment and fish in aqadvisor, and it pretty much gives the same information as you just said...get rid of the CAE due to size and aggression and add a couple more rainbowfish lol but I'm in no way suggesting to use aqadvisor as your only research tool ...
Yep. It's not like it's wrong all the time. It's just that, once you do the research for yourself, there's really no reason to turn to it. Add to that the fact that there are inaccuracies, missing fish, etc..., and I feel that it's better to suggest against newer aquarists even looking at it.
And thanks for posting that link. I'd been meaning to do it, but was too lazy to look it up.
 

Meenu

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sirdarksol said:
And thanks for posting that link. I'd been meaning to do it, but was too lazy to look it up.
made me laugh
 
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