When a fish dies....

KonaBoy
  • #1
What do you do with the body? When I've had fish die, they've been under "warranty", so PetSmart disposes of the body, but I was wondering what other people do? I'm in Residence so I can't really bury my fish like I used to at home, so what do you do? Sorry if this is a touchy subject. Thanks,

Cory
 
sirdarksol
  • #2
However, for many of us, this isn't a matter of "use". It's a matter of love for our companions and the comfort it gives us to provide a decent rest after death. For still others, it is a matter of use, in which case, discarding the fish is a waste.

I bury my fish like you used to (each fish is under a different plant. I'll be busy planting next month. I had a bad winter). In an apartment, what you should do depends on how sentimental you are regarding the body after death. If you have plants (preferably one with a big pot, and not indoors if you have cats), you could bury the fish several inches into the planter. It will provide food for the plant.
If you aren't that sentimental, there is absolutely nothing wrong with putting the fish in the trash.
 
KonaBoy
  • Thread Starter
  • #3
I have no plants, and my trash (mostly paper and old wrappers and such) doesn't get empited too much. I might freeze one if they dies, then bury them this summer.
 
sirdarksol
  • #4
Always another possibility. I have my fish in a freezer right now. (If you can, wrap the fish in paper or paper towels, then seal them in a ziplock bag. They can cause a freezer to smell if left exposed).
 
COBettaCouple
  • #5
I'd agree that it depends on how you feel personally. Flushing, burying or putting a dead fish in the trash are all fine. (I'd take the trash out right away though.)

We bury ours when we can.
 
Peterpiper
  • #6
We have a garden in our front yard. that has a bird bath with a water fountain. this is where our passed pets rest.
 
Allie
  • #7
We live in a building where flushing is our only option. Tho there are a couple of frozen piranha in our freezer waiting to be buried in my parents yard, along side my cat, Winston RIP. They were a bit big to be flushed.
 
mrsmuffin
  • #8
We live in a building where flushing is our only option. Tho there are a couple of frozen piranha in our freezer waiting to be buried in my parents yard, along side my cat, Winston RIP. They were a bit big to be flushed.

The first time I read that I thought that the cat was in the freezer too...
 
Halibut
  • #9
Planting would work except everyone allows their cats to roam free(which I am against BTW) in our community. The result would be dead fish all over the place except for where they were buried.
 
Phishies Inn
  • #10
I would bury them but here in Virginia we don't have dirt, we have clay :| And I can't bury the fish deep enough that my dog won't find them later I usually just end up flushing them...sometimes I feel a bit like they deserve more but meh. It's really up to you! Personally I think the idea of burying them near plants is a great idea...gives the plants some nutrients and the cycle of life and etc
 
Lucy
  • #11
I have clay also, hard in the winter..tough as cement in the summer, so I flush. I do say a few nice words about what a great fishie it was. :-\
 
Morph
  • #12
We live in a building where flushing is our only option. Tho there are a couple of frozen piranha in our freezer waiting to be buried in my parents yard, along side my cat, Winston RIP. They were a bit big to be flushed.

oh god when I firwst read your post I thought winston was in your freezer waiting to be burried too, I was all like ugh.......
 
beginnerfishlover
  • #13
I have just thrown them away. I used to have goldfish and I remember flushing them. But, I never went as far as to have a ceremony or anything.
 
andy65
  • #14
When my GBR died I buried him by our apple tree.

If I like the fish and attached to it I bury it,if not then down the toilet it goes.
 
chickadee
  • #15
We once had a member who went out and purchase a large clay pot and buried her loved bettas in it and bought some decorative small stones at the gardening store to use as small gravestones on the dirt. She did not plant plants in it but I see no reason why there could not be a plant in the pot with them if it would seem appropriate to the one doing the memorial pot. I thought it was a wonderful idea.

There is one caution about flushing a fish who has died of some disease process. This releases the disease process into the rivers and streams among the wild fish and is not fair to do to them. If you even think that the fish is dead due to disease, it should not be flushed.

Rose

I believe the stones just said "Love" and "Peace" and other sentiments of that nature on them and they were the size of the fish in question. It was very touching.
 
Lucy
  • #16
There is one caution about flushing a fish who has died of some disease process. This releases the disease process into the rivers and streams among the wild fish and is not fair to do to them. If you even think that the fish is dead due to disease, it should not be flushed.
Rose

Wow, thanks Rose, I never gave this a thought. I would however think that the waste water is treated.
Consider all the people who flush old medication.
 
sckrik
  • #17
I thought I was crazy when I put our precious rocky in the freezer because we weren't going to be near a river or stream for a few days. he's still there and may be for a while.

we like to release the fish in a river or stream, which is more like it's natural habitat. we're newbies, so fortunately have only had to do this a few times.
 
sirdarksol
  • #18
Rose and Lucy:
There is a definite concern about waste products going into waterways. Yes, the stuff is treated (I think the current tactic usually involves UV sterilization before it goes through chemical removal of ammonia followed by nitrification), but there is always the possibility of something getting through.
Meds are a whole other problem. There are cities that are finding recognizable amounts of antibiotics (low concentrations, so enough to build disease resistance, but not enough to actually affect disease), estrogen, and psychoactive meds in tap water. Before completing the treatment process, these meds (as well as toxic chemicals like bleach) can have an effect on the biological treatment center, making it less effective, the same way that a dose of bleach or antibiotics can un-cycle your tank.

sckrik, I would be concerned about the same things that Rose was concerned in flushing fish. If your fish died of a tropical disease, it's possible that you could be spreading a disease to an ecosystem unprepared for it. The sentiment is beautiful, and I've thought about it a few times, but I think that burying near water is the closest I would come to that.
 
Lucy
  • #19
Meds are a whole other problem. There are cities that are finding recognizable amounts of antibiotics (low concentrations, so enough to build disease resistance, but not enough to actually affect disease), estrogen, and psychoactive meds in tap water.

Thank you for that info, sirdarksol, I think I heard on the news recently about cities in Colorado having that problem with their tap water. Scary thought.

no more flushing for me.
 
sirdarksol
  • #20
I think the current suggested method is to put the meds in a baggy, get them wet, seal the baggy, and discard them in the trash. Of course, this is putting them in a landfill. Hopefully hazardous materials collection agencies will start dealing with them.
 
Lucy
  • #21
I think the current suggested method is to put the meds in a baggy, get them wet, seal the baggy, and discard them in the trash.

You're right..I recently spoke to my pharmacist about discarding meds and that's what he advised.....he also said put old coffee grounds in the bag.
 
Kevin353
  • #22
we always flushed our fish until one of them got to big to flush so I barried it in the front yard. my cat didn't dig it up thank god (wasn't thinking of that when we did it).
 
ER9
  • #23
I bury mine in my house plant a couple inches down and my cat never recognizes they are there. might be time for you to buy a house plant
 
COBettaCouple
  • #24
We liked to bury our lost Bettas (and other special fish) under flowering trees when we were in Florida. Since we won't be having a yard anytime soon here, I like that idea; just hope we won't have to use it for a while.

We once had a member who went out and purchase a large clay pot and buried her loved bettas in it and bought some decorative small stones at the gardening store to use as small gravestones on the dirt. She did not plant plants in it but I see no reason why there could not be a plant in the pot with them if it would seem appropriate to the one doing the memorial pot. I thought it was a wonderful idea.

There is one caution about flushing a fish who has died of some disease process. This releases the disease process into the rivers and streams among the wild fish and is not fair to do to them. If you even think that the fish is dead due to disease, it should not be flushed.

Rose

I believe the stones just said "Love" and "Peace" and other sentiments of that nature on them and they were the size of the fish in question. It was very touching.
 
Lucy
  • #25
I mentioned this post to my husband.

We both agreed we couldn't just flush Prissy Fish (my betta) when she passes (which I hope isn't anytime soon) that we will bury her.
 
bert2001
  • #26
Ba-Woosh!!!
 
Bonochick
  • #27
I buried all of mine, I was lucky that nobody died when the ground was frozen during this past winter. However...I had a fish die when I was out of town. My boyfriend thinks it's silly that I bury them, so I know he didn't bury her. I asked him what he did with her, and he told me to not worry about it and that he took care of her. I have a feeling she ended up in the garbage. I felt bad, but I wasn't there, and I think the ground was frozen at the time anyway, so I guess I unfortunately would have ended up doing the same thing.
 
Annabelle
  • #28
My mums garden is my pet graveyard. I bury all my pets including fish. My dog and cats do dig them up however so I put like six bricks over the grave and around it cause I have found that they have a rather hard time digging through bricks or large stones. Also, where the bricks meet are some convinient cracks for holding flowers (yes, I even do that). If you were worried about cats and you had a pot to bury them in you could put down a layer of large pebbles and that would probably keep you buried fishy safe.
 
seagullnz
  • #29
HI Everyone
I decided to post a new thread but for some of you it's more of a continuation of my last thread ...

Here's the scenario

I lost my precious little Zen this morning

Now I have a fully cycled (8 months) 10G tank with live plants in it ...

When others have lost their little ones do they always strip down the whole tank, sterilize everything etc???

Or could I do a gravel vac and partial water change and rescue another little cup baby.

The thing is it took forever for my tank to cycle! Almost 4 months cause we have ammonia in the tap water (reads around 1) - now when I do a water change there is enough good bacteria in there to convert it in 24 hours but to start all over again

But on the flip side what if there was something in the tank that caused Zens death that I didn't know about?

He was fine till around 4 days ago when suddenly he became very bloated, larthagic, laboured breathing (he didn't pinecone) and I'm pretty sure I didn't overfeed him so I really don't know what caused his very painful death

What have others done in this circumstance?
Opinions greatly appreciated!

thanks
Lily
 
jdhef
  • #30
I'm sorry that you lost your fin baby.

Fish just die. And many times for no apparent reason. I think when bad things happen, we tend to look for a reason to both make sense of it and to try to learn so that it doesn't happen again.

So, if it were me, I would assume that there was nothing wrong with the tank and just get another Betta.
 
kieley
  • #31
theres ammonia in your tap water? does that mean someone is peeing in it at some point?
 
Steen16
  • #32
theres ammonia in your tap water? does that mean someone is peeing in it at some point?

What the heck?
 
Steen16
  • #33
seagullnz

I'm sorry for your loss.

I say go save another!

just do a nice water change/vaccum
 
kieley
  • #34
well what is ammonia I thought its what come out of the fish aka urine and what not... so why would it be in tap water
 
Steen16
  • #35
I'm pretty sure it comes from the water cleaning/chlorine in tap water that keeps it safe for drinking.. But I could be wrong sum1 please elaberate
 
seagullnz
  • #36
Hey

I live in Alberta so pretty gross prairie water!

The town puts chlorine and chloromine (which is what has the ammonia in it) into the supply!

I know it's gross! I only found that our after my tank was taking ages to cycle so I tested the water straight from the tap!
 
dinatwin
  • #37
I'm so sorry to hear you lost Zen. The same happened with my ginger except he pine coned. I did get a new baby Betta a few days later with no problems at all so far. He's a very active, feisty, and builds bubbles nests like crazy. My feeling is to get another little rescue. Again sorry for your loss.
 
pinkfloydpuffer
  • #38
Sorry about your boy. I lost two of mine within weeks of getting them, similarly to your boy. Best of luck to you.
 
nellie
  • #39
I live in Alberta so pretty gross prairie water!
I live in Edmonton, so I know about Alberta water. what I did is bought a couple of oral syringes, Ultimate and Prime. 2mil of Ultimate and 2mil of Prime per 4L ice cream bucket of water. it works like a charm. oh! and 500ml of distilled water to bring ph down. Edmonton water ph 8.5.
 
seagullnz
  • #40
Thanks for the tip!

But what is Ultimate?

I use Prime and when I do a water change add a few drops of StressCoat,
Garlic Guard and Vitachem
 

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