What's the biggest DIY canister I can get? Question 

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JustMe

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I'm planning on building a DIY canister filter soon- just running some ideas right now. I'd like to know your opinion on what I can use as the canister itself. It has to be easily obtained and simple to work with, and airtight as well. The bigger the better.
 
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ryanr

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Well you could probably use something along the lines of the home brew beer barrells?

Can't remember how big they get, probably around 50L (13G or so).

But they would be water tight, however, they might be difficult to maintain.

I don't think size and water tightness would be the problem as much as finding something that would be easy to maintain. As most receptacles tend to all have some form of 'bottle neck'.

Theoretically, you could use plastic yard bins (trash/rubbish bins) with a screw on lid, and just add a large piece of rubber to the lid to form a seal ?
 
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JustMe

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Haha not bad, I like the idea of yard bins. Hmm...
 

kuhliLoachFan

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If you want a closed container rather than an open top container, you will have a lot more pressure to deal with. I think that there is a reason why people stop doing contained vessels (cannister filtration) above a certain size, they go to sumps. A sump is typically open topped, and has a lot of oxygen access, to the media, thus it can be "wet/dry" filtration, which is highly desirable.

I would not DIY a cannister, at all, whereas I think a DIY sump is a great project everybody should do.

The largest DIY wet-dry cannister design I saw was using a plastic filing cabinet from an office-depot type store. I think anything like that would have to be run 24/7 inside another vessel, in case it leaks, causing a real mess in your house.

Sumps can go pear-shape too. But a properly designed sump system will be done with an overflow instead of a siphon outtake, and it is not possible to dump the entire content of the tank out onto your floor, unlike your usual cannister siphon intake. :)

I have heard stories of DIY cannisters exploding due to pressure buildup.

W
 

TedsTank

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Good point...on a huge filter...extra oxygen would be important. The bacteria wouldn't grow in "dead zones" and could actually make poisons. My neighbor and I have made large filters with plastic 55 gal drums (for Koi Pond), but if you had a fish room with a place to hide them you could filter lots of water!!.....they are excellent but do need major cleaning...but not often.
 

djdover

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Echo kuhliLoachFan

I'm in the process of making my first fish tank set up. I'm building to include a sump. What I did to feed the water to the sump is drill a hole in the glass using a diamond encrusted hole drill bit and ran water over it while I drilled. The feed hole is about half way down, so if the power to the return motor fails, only half the water will run down. It has two extra holes at the top, one is over flow and the other is the return hole.

Mainly as I don't like tanks that have tubes going over the top. PM me if you want to ask questions about drilling. Or ask here.
 
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