20 Gallon Tank What's the best way to cycle a new tank with filters from established tanks

JaneGael
Member
In anticipation of redoing my 20 long, I've been running an extra sponge filter in my 29g. I can also squeeze water from the sponges in my HOB tanks to add even more bacteria. I'm not sure how long to run it without fish and if I should add a couple of drops of pure ammonia to help it along.

Also is there any way to avoid new tank syndrome?
 
NevermindIgnoreMe
Member
If you could let it run along in the tank for a few days with 1 drop of ammonia per gallon, and some fish food/frozen shrimp (from the store to be clear) and test, I'd do that to see if it's doing alright.
JaneGael said:
In anticipation of redoing my 20 long, I've been running an extra sponge filter in my 29g. I can also squeeze water from the sponges in my HOB tanks to add even more bacteria. I'm not sure how long to run it without fish and if I should add a couple of drops of pure ammonia to help it along.

Also is there any way to avoid new tank syndrome?
I'd also (well, this is kind of obvious but whatever) test the water a bunch the first weeks/months after adding them and do plenty of water changes with prime (if it helps even a bit why not).
 
JustAFishServant
Member
Awesome question!! Honestly, the way that I seed filter sponge is by just sticking it into the established tank. It works every time! But honestly another way you could do it is by added the media into the existing filter, or add a new filter altogether.

If you need more help, I'd highly recommend checking out Girl Talks Fish on YouTube! She has a really good series about experimenting with different cycling methods
 
carsonsgjs
Member
Just move over your extra sponge filter into your new tank when you are ready to add your new fish. Easiest way really. The new fish will product waste to keep your bacteria fed.
 
mattgirl
Member
When I set up a new tank and use seeded sponge filters I add the fish right away. As long as the sponge filter has been running in the cycled tank at least a month and the bio-load in the new tank is lower than it is in the cycled tank there should be enough bacteria on the sponge to prevent spikes in either ammonia or nitrites in the new tank. I normally start seeing nitrates within a week or so.

You are basically instantly cycling the new tank. Cycling a tank simply means growing enough bacteria to remove the ammonia the fish are producing. Moving the seeded sponge should instantly provide the tank with enough bacteria. It will still take time to get firmly established meaning the bacteria has spread throughout the tank and is now growing on everything in the tank. Keep an eye on the parameters and do water changes as needed.
 

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