What’s the best all in one Betta food?

Wiss1

My son is going to get his first Betta after Christmas. I’m looking in to a staple Betta food but don’t really know what’s best as there seem to be a variety of makes and types?? I’ve read people talk about pellets….2-3 a day but how big are these pellets, I don’t want to underfeed. I know they like variety and we have some frozen daphnia ( for the other tank) as a treat but want to know what to get as the staple food. Not too too expensive as if the fish gets used to it and likes it, he will have to fund it himself through pocket money eventually when first tub runs out ( that will be a stocking pressie). I’ve also read floating is best. I’m in UK.
Also I have to ask…. I’ve seen companies online that post fish!! Do people actually get fish delivered to their door??? Are they not super stressed and damaged ???? We will probably go and pick one from a fish shop but just wondering?!
 

MacZ

I’ve seen companies online that post fish!! Do people actually get fish delivered to their door???
Yes, over the past 20 years this has become a common thing. Still only makes up maybe half the market, as the shipping often costs a lot extra and it just doesn't make sense to buy 2 common domestic guppies for 1-2 bucks and pay almost 40 for the delivery.
Shipping has mostly the advantages of ralely having to deal with diseases (reputable online vendors usually have little problems with that, due to good quarantine), of getting fish that may be locally unavailable (either because the local store doesn't carry them in their regular assortment or won't do special orders) and of any mistakes a casual fishkeeper might make while transporting. Usually the vendors give a "live arrival" guarantee.
Are they not super stressed and damaged ????
What do you think how the fish get from the breeding farms or wholesalers to the retailer? Yes, there are losses, let's be clear about this. During the 90s for every fish that ended up in a hobbyist tank between 10 and 20 others didn't make it. Nowerdays this has been lowered to a survival rate of 1 in 5 to 1 in 10 at worst. Mind you, these are the losses between source and end consumer, not between retailer and customer.

The bulk of them usually occurs between the fish farm (if domestic) or the collection station (if wild caught) and the wholesaler, a good chunk between wholesaler and retailer and a relatively small number between retailer and hobbyist.
Biggest problem for the hobbyist is the fact that whichever fish reaches our tanks is either in good condition or on its last legs. There is rarely something inbetween.

I prefer looking at the fish before buying to be sure they are healthy, but I'm starting to prefer certain reputable vendors as I know their pracitices minimize stress and risk of losses by cutting out at least one station, maybe several.

And about the food:
Live/frozen: Artemia, Daphnia, white mosquito larvae, Cyclops. No bloodworms, they are junk.
Dry food should be pellets, the ingredients should list as little starches as possible. No grains, no legumes, no potatoes... and no generic fish meal. Wheat gluten is fine. As long as the ingredients are right, the brand doesn't matter.
 

Wiss1

Yes, over the past 20 years this has become a common thing. Still only makes up maybe half the market, as the shipping often costs a lot extra and it just doesn't make sense to buy 2 common domestic guppies for 1-2 bucks and pay almost 40 for the delivery.
Shipping has mostly the advantages of ralely having to deal with diseases (reputable online vendors usually have little problems with that, due to good quarantine), of getting fish that may be locally unavailable (either because the local store doesn't carry them in their regular assortment or won't do special orders) and of any mistakes a casual fishkeeper might make while transporting. Usually the vendors give a "live arrival" guarantee.

What do you think how the fish get from the breeding farms or wholesalers to the retailer? Yes, there are losses, let's be clear about this. During the 90s for every fish that ended up in a hobbyist tank between 10 and 20 others didn't make it. Nowerdays this has been lowered to a survival rate of 1 in 5 to 1 in 10 at worst. Mind you, these are the losses between source and end consumer, not between retailer and customer.

The bulk of them usually occurs between the fish farm (if domestic) or the collection station (if wild caught) and the wholesaler, a good chunk between wholesaler and retailer and a relatively small number between retailer and hobbyist.
Biggest problem for the hobbyist is the fact that whichever fish reaches our tanks is either in good condition or on its last legs. There is rarely something inbetween.

I prefer looking at the fish before buying to be sure they are healthy, but I'm starting to prefer certain reputable vendors as I know their pracitices minimize stress and risk of losses by cutting out at least one station, maybe several.

And about the food:
Live/frozen: Artemia, Daphnia, white mosquito larvae, Cyclops. No bloodworms, they are junk.
Dry food should be pellets, the ingredients should list as little starches as possible. No grains, no legumes, no potatoes... and no generic fish meal. Wheat gluten is fine. As long as the ingredients are right, the brand doesn't matter.
Hmmm yes interesting thank you. Hadn’t really thought about how they get to store. The idea of shipping a fish just seemed very weird although I guess they have couriers not just letting Hermes lose with them lol!! - guess you really can get everything online now!
 

MacZ

In Europe it's mostly DHL/GO!. They have specialized departments for live-animal-transport.
 

BigManAquatics

I definitely prefer pellets for bettas myself, much easier for me at least to not over-feed, like i always feel i end up doing with flakes.
 

ruud

Hmmm yes interesting thank you. Hadn’t really thought about how they get to store. The idea of shipping a fish just seemed very weird although I guess they have couriers not just letting Hermes lose with them lol!! - guess you really can get everything online now!

I was told meat is made in grocery stores.
 

Wiss1

I definitely prefer pellets for bettas myself, much easier for me at least to not over-feed, like i always feel i end up doing with flakes.
Do you have a favourite brand??
 

PAcanis

I feed mine Hikari Betta Bio-Gold pellets. It's what the LFS had. Plus it eats flakes and frozen brine shrimp.
Just don't follow the instructions or you'll be feeding way too much, which I found out. Sometimes 2, sometimes 4. Depending on if a Neon steals one.
 

BigManAquatics

Do you have a favourite brand??
Xtreme and Bug Bites is usually what i have.
 

Wiss1

Xtreme and Bug Bites is usually what i have.
Which size bug bites and how many?? I see they do 4 sizes. I bought some catfish pellets for his corydoras and they were too big don’t want to make same mistake again!
 

georgelee1000

Bug bite is pretty good. Omega one and nls are also solid food.
Look at the ingradients. It will tell you.
 

Rose of Sharon

Fluval Bug Bites has a betta formula - slow sinking granules. It's a great product. And I agree with Hikari baby bio gold pellets. I also use North Fin betta pellets. All have high protein and low fillers.
 

betta06

mine eat Fluval bug bites tropical slow sinking pellets and Fluval bug bites betta formula pellets and frozen blood worms once or twice a week. oh and since I have 3 bottles some type of flake they get those everyone in a while to although it is not the best quality so I don't give it to them that often (one of my bettas does seems to prefer them though)
 

Wiss1

Ok thanks, bug bites seem to be popular, they were one I was looking at although hadn’t found a betta formula.
 

ruud

My favorite brand is "Live foods - Make fish work for it".
 

Tigerburp

Bettas do best with a variety of foods so I would get different types of foods opposed to a single one
 

Wiss1

My favorite brand is "Live foods - Make fish work for it".
Yes but I’m nervous about introducing anything unwanted to the tank and I don’t really have a “trusted” fish store yet so I’m happier going for frozen for the time being I think.
Thanks guys… getting there. Just bought a 19L tank to replace the 12L which we were going to use ( which currently holds 2 platy - they’re going in to the bigger tropical tank) so Mr Betta will have more room as was feeling a bit bad putting him in the smaller one :-( . Mind you I’ve seen the poor guys literally in plastic cups for sale in the US in a pet shop bless. All ready for a post Christmas shopping trip to find the perfect one!
 

ValkyrieLips

My betta eats the s/m cichlid bug bites formula. I personally found the betta formula to be too small for my adult male, but if you're getting a baby/juvenile betta then they should be fine.
 

RayClem

There are some pretty good commercial formulas, but never consider a single food as the only food for your fish. Just like you would not want to eat the same thing for dinner every day, no matter how healthy the dish, it is best to offer your fish a variety of flake, pellet, live, freeze dried, and frozen foods. Either flakes or pellets should be the staple of their diet, with the other types being offered occasionally as treats.

Remember though, that bettas have upturned mouths, so they prefer eating either at the surface or higher levels of the water column. Thus, avoid pellets that sink quickly to the bottom unless that tank also contains bottom feeding fish like corydoras.

Also bettas have small mouths, so they do best with smaller size foods.
 

betta06

My betta eats the s/m cichlid bug bites formula. I personally found the betta formula to be too small for my adult male, but if you're getting a baby/juvenile betta then they should be fine.
I agree. the tropical fish one is bigger though so that is what I mainly feed mine.
 

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