What's On My Driftwood?

Discussion in 'Freshwater Beginners' started by bob350, May 28, 2018.

  1. bob350New MemberMember

    Every since i did wc yesterday, my fishes are not eating and I noticed a lot of this on my driftwood? 1527517020806.jpg
     
  2. appcontrol

    appcontrolWell Known MemberMember

    It's fungus, nothing scary it is normal on new driftwood and it will go away in few weeks. Btw. shrimps, snails, plecos love to eat that.

    As fish not eating check water parameters first.
    Second info that would be good is: is your tank cycled? How big it is? How old? What and how many fishes do you have?
     
  3. OP
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    bob350New MemberMember

    Thanks, my tank got cycled last week. Parameters are good

    Ammonia is zero
    Nitrite is zero
    Nitrate - 10
    Ph - 8.2

    I have 4 yellow lab, 2 snow white, 3 demasoni. There are all juveniles. They were eating good until yesterday morning. Everyone lying low since last night. No visible signs of any diseases. Except 1 yellow lab became so pale.

    BTW I have a 33 gal tank. I know it is small but since they are juveniles I hope it is Ok for now.


    Edit - all were doing great until yesterday's wc. I am suspecting it resulted in a ph change. It was 8.4 last week. Not sure if ph might be affecting them.
     




    Last edited: May 28, 2018
  4. FishGirl38

    FishGirl38Valued MemberMember

    As someone previously stated, it is normal and nothing at all to be worried about. Amano shrimp, nerite snails or otocinclus will eat at it. But it will dissipate in a few weeks. That happens with many types of driftwood, grape-vine, spiderwood, and malaysian driftwood all do it. I use mopani driftwood, and I have yet to see that slimey layer over my mopani.

    Either way, nothing to worry about. Especially if the tank is cycled. and 9 african cichlids in a 33 is a little much...BUT, with africans...I've heard if you crowd them together and 'keep more than you should' then theres less aggression and they moreso school with eachother. BUT, I don't have african cichlids and haven't tried that. At full size they'll be a lil crowded but I think you'll be okay.
     
  5. OP
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    bob350New MemberMember

    Thanks. I agree with the number of mbunas. I started with 4 of them but they were hiding all the time. Adding a few more helped them to come out of the rocks. What worries me is their lack of appetite.
     
  6. appcontrol

    appcontrolWell Known MemberMember

    Hmm it shouldn't be ph it's not that big of a change. Do you clean your gravel? Did you treat your water? Did you add matching temparature water in tank?
     
  7. OP
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    bob350New MemberMember

    Yes, I have a sand substrate and I stir it every time I do a wc. Also I took care of the temperature and I treated the water with prime
     
  8. FishGirl38

    FishGirl38Valued MemberMember

    Mmmhmm. And the whole 'lessens aggression' thing works for the most part. I never like recommending overstocking a tank, but sometimes it helps. In our store tanks, I'm convinced the reason our jaguar cichlids and convicts ect don't fight is because there are 30+ of them to each 29 gal tank. They only start chasing and nipping when the stock is down to 5 or so.

    What are you feeding them? a variety is always better. If you feed the same thing time and time again, try treating them with something different? I again agree with the above post. .2 change in PH isn't really enough to stress your fish into not eating. Though, as a heads-up, you shouldn't feed your african cichlids bloodworms. My co-worker swears it can cause 'malawi bloat'.

    With sand, are you aware that if the sand bed is too deep, it can allow toxic gaseous waste material to be trapped under the sand? Basically, when old food and what not get's sifted down to the bottom, and begins to break down, it releases gases, if the sand bed is too deep for those gases to immediately rise out of the tank, then they can be trapped and sit down there...If/When you stir the sand and release the bubbles, if fish breathe those bubbles in, it can be toxic. This is a long shot spit-ball, probably not the problem, but just something to be aware of.

    Edit: the aforementioned issue is predominantly a problem in salt-water aquariums. But it can happen in freshwater too. Especially if you've ever had an issue with cyano-bacteria. (which is a red or blue/green slime that appears like algae but settles just on top of the substrate and can be scooped out with a net.)
     
  9. NavyChief20

    NavyChief20Well Known MemberMember

    a .2 pH change is nothing. Thats a drop in the bucket. Fading colors is an indicator of stress for one reason or another. What are you keeping your water temperature at and what are your hardness numbers?
     
  10. appcontrol

    appcontrolWell Known MemberMember

    What do you feed them usually? Maybe try some diffrent food. Good trick is to soak food in garlic "oil". Squeeze one fresh garlic add few ml of water put it in microwave for 15-20 sec. let it to get room temperature remove garlic keep just water. Soak food in it for few mins and try to feed them.

    That is good for internal parasites and immune system too and that could be a problem if they did eat until now. I doo this and peas once a week.
     
  11. NavyChief20

    NavyChief20Well Known MemberMember

    The gass burping will cause an ammonia bomb. It would be detectable right away and they wont last long. Its doubtful this is the cause. Bloodworms will ABSOLUTELY cause malawi bloat.
     
  12. OP
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    bob350New MemberMember

    I have a shallow sand substrate and I stir them slightly during every wc. Wrt to food, I have been feeding them only jbl(German brand) pellets. I starved them this morning to see if they are ok later tonight.
     
  13. appcontrol

    appcontrolWell Known MemberMember

    If it's new tnk i don't think that gass would getin sand that quickly and probably wouldn't affect all fishes. And for blood worms they can bloat all fish if you feed them just that. Various food is everything. I have community tank and feed them flakes, two types of granular food, tubifex driedfreez, cory tablets, pea etc. Every day or two they get diffrent food.
     
  14. NavyChief20

    NavyChief20Well Known MemberMember

    Realistically you just need the proper conditions for the gas to form and its mostly and anerobic state. As far as bloodworms youre right it will cause bloat in just about everything. Since i keep Cichlids i am especially wary of it.
     
  15. FishGirl38

    FishGirl38Valued MemberMember

    I didn't think it was the gas thing either, just so we're all clear. I just feel like that is something most people don't think about/aren't aware could happen ( I wasn't when I used sand the first time), and he mentioned he had sand. Agreed, in newer tanks the gas thing doesn't happen. And agreed as well with the variety thing. I feed my S/A cichlids hikari pellet, freeze dried brine cubes, frozen krill, Fluval cichlid pellets, Omega shrimp pellets, Omega cichlid flake, frozen brine/discus blend by Omega, spectrum pellets, Omega freeze dried shrimp....I work at an LFS, my fish food cabinet is more stocked than my pantry. :X.

    A variety best mimics what they have in the wild, and also, some fish prefer different foods. My severum will now only eat the Omega shrimp pellets, and occasionally the frozen stuff, she swims past everything else.
     




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