What's Causing The Death!?

TombedOrchestra

Valued Member
Messages
254
Reaction score
16
Points
53
55gal. 0 ammonia, 0 nitrite, 20ish nitrates. Stable 8.2 ph, higher alkalinity. Weekly / bi-weekly water changes. Temp 76. Stocked with Guppies, Platies, Mollys, Tetras, 1 pleco. (Tetras / pleco new).

Over the past month / month and a half I've been having consistent deaths. Very slowly. Not all at once. Every four days to a week there will be another death. It seems to 'come out of nowhere'. Fish is fine the night before, dead the next morning.

I saw a fish or two pooping white 2 weeks ago. I did a course of parasite treatment, however I'm still getting deaths a week later. (Perhaps they were fish that already had the parasites in them and they finally succumbed to the disease?)

I'm not sure what else to think of at this point. I understand deaths soon after acclimation due to shock / adjustment issues. But, I have fish that have been in there a month or two and then die. Honestly, since I've started fish tanking back in October, I have not had any of my fish stay alive more than 1-2 months tops. I've probably cycled through all my fish once or twice. Something just doesn't seem right?

Should I just do a 'general' treatment for bacteria? What else could be causing these strange deaths out of the blue? I know the pH is high, but as long as it's stable with a slow acclimation, it should be ok correct?

Appreciate the help! Thanks.
 

Wraithen

Fishlore VIP
Messages
4,352
Reaction score
1,694
Points
198
Experience
3 years
Sounds like a buildup of something you aren't testing for. Check your local water report to see what it may be.
 

KimberlyG

Fishlore VIP
Messages
5,025
Reaction score
2,926
Points
363
Experience
More than 10 years
My 15 tanks and 1 QT run at a pH of 8.0 to 8.2, my KH is 15. There is something else going on in your tank.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #4

TombedOrchestra

Valued Member
Messages
254
Reaction score
16
Points
53
Wraithen said:
Sounds like a buildup of something you aren't testing for. Check your local water report to see what it may be.
I use a natural spring... local tap has high sulfur. Natural spring tests good, though. I have no other water source to get it from (without spending 55 dollars for water at the store)
 

KimberlyG

Fishlore VIP
Messages
5,025
Reaction score
2,926
Points
363
Experience
More than 10 years
TombedOrchestra said:
I use a natural spring... local tap has high sulfur. Natural spring tests good, though. I have no other water source to get it from (without spending 55 dollars for water at the store)
Are you using carbon in your filter? A lot of us don't but in your case I think I would.
 

stella1979

Moderator
Messages
7,494
Reaction score
9,629
Points
608
Experience
5 to 10 years
It sounds like an illness was introduced, and eventually, all fish are succumbing to it. White stringy poops are indicative of internal parasites, which may also explain the slower deaths as the fish are actually starving while the parasite is getting all the nutrients. Are the fish getting skinny or lethargic at all?

I agree that there is something definitely going on in the tank, and carbon sure couldn't hurt. You may also want to research internal parasite symptoms and treatment options.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #8

TombedOrchestra

Valued Member
Messages
254
Reaction score
16
Points
53
stella1979 said:
It sounds like an illness was introduced, and eventually, all fish are succumbing to it. White stringy poops are indicative of internal parasites, which may also explain the slower deaths as the fish are actually starving while the parasite is getting all the nutrients. Are the fish getting skinny or lethargic at all?

I agree that there is something definitely going on in the tank, and carbon sure couldn't hurt. You may also want to research internal parasite symptoms and treatment options.
I got the tank in October last year and had still been using the same carbon filter (I didn't know you're supposed to change it!!!)

I just put fresh ones in 5 days ago. LFS said that if you leave carbon in too long it can release toxins... however, she said it would have shown up as ammonia in the tank (mine has always tested ZERO). Perhaps it was releasing other stuff not detectable?

Jay Chen said:
Maybe you used a treatment for external parasites when you need to treat them internally instead.
Perhaps? ... I used herbtana parasite medicine (general for ich, flukes, chilodonella, etc etc).
 

Jay Chen

Valued Member
Messages
50
Reaction score
19
Points
43
Experience
1 year
TombedOrchestra said:
I got the tank in October last year and had still been using the same carbon filter (I didn't know you're supposed to change it!!!)

I just put fresh ones in 5 days ago. LFS said that if you leave carbon in too long it can release toxins... however, she said it would have shown up as ammonia in the tank (mine has always tested ZERO). Perhaps it was releasing other stuff not detectable?



Perhaps? ... I used herbtana parasite medicine (general for ich, flukes, chilodonella, etc etc).
Herbatana only treats external parasites so that means it doesn't do anything to the parasites inside the body.
 

Rtessy

Fishlore VIP
Messages
7,093
Reaction score
3,477
Points
448
Experience
4 years
I've heard good things about prazi pro and have success treating external parasites, but it can treat internal ones as well. Food should not be soaked in it, however. Also, it only takes care of worms and worm-like parasites
 

stella1979

Moderator
Messages
7,494
Reaction score
9,629
Points
608
Experience
5 to 10 years
I've not had good luck with herbal stuff in the past. To each their own, but if you're sure treatment is needed, I'd consider stronger meds.

Also, Ich and flukes are external parasites, but it sounds like your fish have gut parasites. Sooo, it would be best if the fish eat their meds. Metronidazole is a good drug of choice for this. You could buy food already medicated with metro online, or you could make your own with pellets and a couple of Seachem products, Metroplex and Focus. Instructions can be found here...
Seachem - MetroPlex

What they don't tell you is that after you make the food you want to spread it out on some parchment or wax paper and allow it to dry before storing in a closed container. When it's time to feed you want to target the fish as much as possible... point being to get the food into the fish very quickly. As the food sits in water it will start to release some of the med into the water column, instead of in the fish's belly where we want it. Metro in the water column treats external parasites, while Metro that has been eaten should take care of internal parasites.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #12

TombedOrchestra

Valued Member
Messages
254
Reaction score
16
Points
53
stella1979 said:
I've not had good luck with herbal stuff in the past. To each their own, but if you're sure treatment is needed, I'd consider stronger meds.

Also, Ich and flukes are external parasites, but it sounds like your fish have gut parasites. Sooo, it would be best if the fish eat their meds. Metronidazole is a good drug of choice for this. You could buy food already medicated with metro online, or you could make your own with pellets and a couple of Seachem products, Metroplex and Focus. Instructions can be found here...
Seachem - MetroPlex

What they don't tell you is that after you make the food you want to spread it out on some parchment or wax paper and allow it to dry before storing in a closed container. When it's time to feed you want to target the fish as much as possible... point being to get the food into the fish very quickly. As the food sits in water it will start to release some of the med into the water column, instead of in the fish's belly where we want it. Metro in the water column treats external parasites, while Metro that has been eaten should take care of internal parasites.
So how would I know which fish actually needs it? The fish I've talked about show NO signs of illness. For example, I had a molly die yesterday I've had for about a month. He was swimming around OK and then later in the day upside down at the bottom. Then the other molly he always swam with died this morning.. swimming around all fine last night, upside down this morning. How would I target a fish that is acting fine!?

Thanks!
 

Rtessy

Fishlore VIP
Messages
7,093
Reaction score
3,477
Points
448
Experience
4 years
I'd just Medicate all of the food with Metro and Focus, or if you use a different medication, just treat the whole tank.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #14

TombedOrchestra

Valued Member
Messages
254
Reaction score
16
Points
53
Rtessy said:
I'd just Medicate all of the food with Metro and Focus, or if you use a different medication, just treat the whole tank.
Any repercussions for treating the tank if it's not the disease I'm treating for? (Are the meds going to affect the fish negatively or cause more stress the more medications I do?)
 

stella1979

Moderator
Messages
7,494
Reaction score
9,629
Points
608
Experience
5 to 10 years
TombedOrchestra said:
So how would I know which fish actually needs it? The fish I've talked about show NO signs of illness. For example, I had a molly die yesterday I've had for about a month. He was swimming around OK and then later in the day upside down at the bottom. Then the other molly he always swam with died this morning.. swimming around all fine last night, upside down this morning. How would I target a fish that is acting fine!?

Thanks!
Diagnosing is the hard part, unfortunately, and the precise reason I say to each their own. From what you've reported, that you've recycled all your stock more than once, I would say that something is definitely going on. The decision to treat is yours though because you are the one actually seeing what's going on. Sorry, I know that's less than helpful. The Metro food is what I would do in your situation with the information I have.

I would also treat everybody, as this appears to be moving through all the fish in your tank. Metro is considered to be a very gentle and safe medication. With any treatment though, read all you can about it and follow instructions to the letter.

What I mean by targeting the fish is just to do whatever you need to in order to get them to eat quickly. This might mean simply approaching the tank, or putting your fingers in the water to imitate feeding, thus getting the fish excited and ready to eat the moment you drop the medicated food.
 
Toggle Sidebar

Aquarium Calculator

Follow FishLore!





Top Bottom