What type of black algae is this?

Crimson_687

My nerite snails don’t touch it. I’ve tried scraping it off with my fingernails and it did not come off, so I’m sure it’s not diatoms. It’s not fuzzy/furry like black beard algae.

It doesn’t seem to expand its growth necessarily and doesn’t overtake the tank, it just grows on certain surfaces (rocks and Anubias leaves especially). It doesn’t expand enough to completely block any particular leaf from light. It appears dark green or black, depending on the surface it’s on.

I’ve also got some growth on my glass. With a bowfront, would it be best to get a scrubber with a long handle or would a magna float turned vertical work alright?
 

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SM1199

I'm curious to know as well. I have some algae that looks just like that on my anubias. I can't tell you what it is, but I've moved my anubias to my neo shrimp tank and they picked it off of all the leaves within a week. I moved them back to the main tank and now it doesn't come back if I just rub my fingers over the leaves once a week. I tried peroxide at one point and it didn't make a significant difference.
 
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Crimson_687

I'm curious to know as well. I have some algae that looks just like that on my anubias. I can't tell you what it is, but I've moved my anubias to my neo shrimp tank and they picked it off of all the leaves within a week. I moved them back to the main tank and now it doesn't come back if I just rub my fingers over the leaves once a week. I tried peroxide at one point and it didn't make a significant difference.
That’s interesting, seeing that my Amano shrimp do not eat it, however there isn’t any of this stuff in my cherry shrimp tank either.. unless the Amanos do eat it, but there is only 3 of them and not enough to clear this stuff out

Unless I move stuff out of my shrimp tank, the rocks and driftwood the anubias is attached to is much too large to fit, but if it gets bad enough I’ll definitely consider that.

Just wondering, do you have any idea what tank conditions you had that may have allowed the algae to grow? Does it mean anything bad?
 
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AggressiveAquatics

Maybe black beard algae?
 
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Kribensis27

I have this too, in one of my tanks. Definitely not BBA. On the front glass, my average algae scraper does a pretty good job. Elsewhere in the tank, I can’t find anything that will eat it. I’ve just kind of accepted it and moved on. I don’t mind it too much.
 
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Crimson_687

It came off the glass easy, but the growth on the anubias and rocks is slowly getting worse. The leaves in the pic are now entirely covered +1. They seem to do best in high flow- those leaves are directly below my filter output and the neighboring anubias is completely spared of this stuff.

The rocks I cannot clean off because of their texture, but I’m thinking I’ll try resting them outside the tank and see if the algae will dry out or if I can scrape it off with sandpaper.

The leaves I’m not so sure about. I’ll try lying them flat on a plastic surface and slowly scraping with an ID card.
 
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LouPey

I've got this too on my java fern. I suspected it's got something to do with low carbon dioxide levels...
I've got a nerite snail, ottos and a BN plec in there and nothing!
 
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Crimson_687

Alright, so yesterday I did a wc and attempted to clean rocks and leaves.

The rocks required some good scraping with a flathead, but it did finally come off. As for the anubias leaves, I decided not to disturb the plant (it had rooted into the substrate, as well as being attached to the driftwood) so I put each leaf in my hand and scrubbed as much as I could with a toothbrush. I couldn't get all of it off and the edges were impossible, but a good amount of the stuff got removed.

I recently got a small group of endlers (planning to move them to a nano tank, but for now they're in my community tank) and they actually really enjoy nibbling at it! I can't say such a tiny mouth would get rid of a lot, but in the spot where they do nibble, it is visibly gone. They seem to enjoy it too.
 
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LouPey

Alright, so yesterday I did a wc and attempted to clean rocks and leaves.

The rocks required some good scraping with a flathead, but it did finally come off. As for the anubias leaves, I decided not to disturb the plant (it had rooted into the substrate, as well as being attached to the driftwood) so I put each leaf in my hand and scrubbed as much as I could with a toothbrush. I couldn't get all of it off and the edges were impossible, but a good amount of the stuff got removed.

I recently got a small group of endlers (planning to move them to a nano tank, but for now they're in my community tank) and they actually really enjoy nibbling at it! I can't say such a tiny mouth would get rid of a lot, but in the spot where they do nibble, it is visibly gone. They seem to enjoy it too.
Glad to hear your endlers are helping you win th fight against the algae! I've been watching a few videos that suggest putting liquid carbon directly onto the affected areas....
 
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StarGirl

It looks like Cyano too me. Is it on the substrate also?
 
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Crimson_687

It looks like Cyano too me. Is it on the substrate also?
I haven’t seen it on the substrate.
Looking at the profile pics cyano does look similar. They also had a slimy feel..
 
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StarGirl

I haven’t seen it on the substrate.
Looking at the profile pics cyano does look similar. They also had a slimy feel..
Ive heard it really smells bad too.
 
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Crimson_687

Ive heard it really smells bad too.
Don’t know about that one. There’s no smell on the toothbrush I used to clean it off
 
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Kribensis27

Ive heard it really smells bad too.
Depends on the type. I've had a few infestations. Some smells absolutely awful, while some is odorless. Some types also make the tank smell a bit swampy, but not too bad.
 
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Crimson_687

So I have no idea why, but not only do my cherry shrimp love this black stuff, it is making them more red.

I added some cherry shrimp to my community tank and noticed that their red color intensified, so much so I actually added a few back to my shrimp tank, then noticed their color die back again.
I added a small piece of leaf that was covered in the black stuff to my shrimp tank. Not only did they swarm it, they picked it clean, and the shrimp that participated in the fast feast became more red. Cyano belongs to the same family as spirulina, which has been known to enhance shrimp color

I feed the shrimp tank bacter AE, so I don't think the color change is from biofilm, unless there is a difference between bacter AE and biofilm grown in the tank itself.

Is it really the cyano making them more red or something else? If it is the cyano, what pigment would cause this and how could I cultivate cyano?
 
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Crimson_687

Put in this leaf yesterday and they’re still working at it. I’ve noticed that not all the shrimp have a taste for it and it’s mostly the older shrimp with very few sub-adults that eat it, so I guess it’s an acquired taste. Snails love it too. When I put in the leaf it was 100% covered in a thick black layer
 

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