What type of Bacteria are bacteria blooms

SouthAmericanCichlids

Member
I am not experiencing a bacteria bloom rn. Or ever, really. So I haven't really had to do much research on them. But I hear all the time the cause and how to solve it, but not much on what type of bacteria cause it, and I would love to go into extensive research on the different types.
 

AggressiveAquatics

Member
I could be very wrong because I haven’t researched anything but I think it’s just bb. It’s just when it is more in the water column than usual
 

DoubleDutch

Member
Most bacterial blioms are caused by several heterotrophic bacteria (not BB) that feast temporarily on certain minerals / compounds in the water. That's why they often occure in new set ups. There is not one bacterium to blame.

Doing NOTHING often solves the problem.
 
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SouthAmericanCichlids

Member
What are some very common types? Or an article that explains the different types and their properties.
 

DoubleDutch

Member
SouthAmericanCichlids said:
What are some very common types? Or an article that explains the different types and their properties.
I don't have "common" names.
Here is a general article explaining the differences.

A lot of baterial bacterial starters contain heterotrophic bacteria which aren't the real ones (mainly autotrophic) in the cycle.


 
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SouthAmericanCichlids

Member
DoubleDutch said:
I don't have "common" names.
I meant, just a few ones that are found often. I'm okay with scientific names. And thanks for the article!
 

DoubleDutch

Member
SouthAmericanCichlids said:
I meant, just a few ones that are found often. I'm okay with scientific names. And thanks for the article!
Hahahaha I've been searching but can't find names. Will search further tomorrow.
Funny thing is that the starters don't mention names as well.
 

AvalancheDave

Member
 

MrBryan723

Member
E. Coli is a common one. Salmonella can also be parts of blooms. There's just so many, and even algaes that are part of the bacterial blooms. Different yeasts as well. You have different amoebas and protozoa that eat the smaller bacteria and a whole food chain system all taking place in a bloom. If you have access to a decent microscope you can see all kinds of different things in a slide.
 

Kaity

Member
MrBryan723 said:
E. Coli is a common one. Salmonella can also be parts of blooms. There's just so many, and even algaes that are part of the bacterial blooms. Different yeasts as well. You have different amoebas and protozoa that eat the smaller bacteria and a whole food chain system all taking place in a bloom. If you have access to a decent microscope you can see all kinds of different things in a slide.
There are so many possible. Many water testing companies will run a test to tell you approximately how many types you have and if you have any dangerous ones but I think all components of the micro biome are still being studied. I don't know of specific names off hand but you might be able to figure some out specific to your water with a microscope and micro biology text book or get your fishtank water tested at a lab. Basic test will tell you if coliform type bacteria are present or not. Kinda vague as there are lots of coliform bacteria. Basic test might also give you an MPN. MPN is a count of the number of of bacteria present in 100 ml of water. There is also an e. Coli positive or negative.
 

MacZ

Member
The bacteria can also be different by continent, country and even region and season. So besides a whole list of known bacteria there is no certainty whithout a lab test.
 

Andres391

Member
Anaerobic bacteria that also have denitrifying bacteria, nitrates and nitrites. Doing nothing help solve it on its own but if your nitrates and or nitrites are too high you can dose up to 6x with prime to detoxify them and get processed faster by Anaerobic denitrifying bacteria. Or water changes if you got no ammonia in your tap water.
 

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