What species of lymnaeidae is this?

Lucas35

Member
I found some of these snails in the lake near me (British Columbia). At first I thought they where baby lymnaea stagnalis. Eventually they stoped growing at only about 0.4" though. Then today I found two baby snails that couldn't be from any other species (there is a radix peregra but it was in a different container until Thursday so there's no way it laid eggs that then hatched in 2 days) at first I thought the baby's where bladder snails but I realized they where right coiling. I also found some eggs that where around a plant stem which might be ramshorn eggs but I've never seen them do that. I knew then that those snails where not great pond snails. They lived alongside Physella sp and helisoma anceps. They where the second most common species (they was lots of Physella but I only ever found a few helisoma anceps. There wasn't a lot of these snails but they where uncommon). I did some research and I think they are a species of Galba or Stagnicola. I can't figure out which species though. For reference here is a list of the species of those genera that occur in British Columbia. All of them occur in lakes too. Oddly, the global conservation status of all of those species is the equivalent of Least concern but only two where LC in British Columbia.

Galba

Galba bulimoides
Galba dalli
Galba galbana
Galba modicella
Galba obrussa
Galba parva
Galba holzingeri
Galba funiculata

Stagnicola

Stagnicola apicina
Stagnicola arctica
Stagnicola caperata
Stagnicola catascopium
Stagnicola palustris
Stagnicola elodes

Adults


Baby's


Eggs?
 

richiep

Member
They do resemble pond snails which do coil opposite to bladder snails, this is the only thing I can think of, i wonder if they are a larger specias of pond snail that may only live in your waters,
 

erinw347

Member
After studying the taxonomy my best guess is S. elodes but it would help quite a bit if you could show the opening of the shell.

Additionally, the last two pictures of the babies look like ramshorn to me. The eggs do as well, but maybe try touching them as ramshorn eggs are firm.
 
  • Thread Starter

Lucas35

Member
richiep said:
They do resemble pond snails which do coil opposite to bladder snails, this is the only thing I can think of, i wonder if they are a larger specias of pond snail that may only live in your waters,
As far as I know there are no lymnaeidae endemic to BC but many species of Stagnicola look different from location to location. So your probably right that this is a morph of a species specific to this lake, but what species?

erinw347 said:
After studying the taxonomy my best guess is S. elodes but it would help quite a bit if you could show the opening of the shell.

Additionally, the last two pictures of the babies look like ramshorn to me. The eggs do as well, but maybe try touching them as ramshorn eggs are firm.
Sorry I can't get any right now but I will post some when I can. That snail is normally wandering around the tank all the time then I wanted to get a picture yesterday for this forum and he is hiding somewhere. I had to find some old pictures of them.

They could be. I breed ramshorn in that tank too. That is not what a normal, healthy baby ramshorn looks like but sometimes I find deformed ones and that's likely what it is. That makes sense that the eggs are ramshorn. I thought they might be. I had just never seen them around something like that.
 

richiep

Member
I think only local knowledge may help you on that one, maybe local wildlife group
 
  • Thread Starter

Lucas35

Member
I had a look too see what other species of lymnaeidae live in bc and there are two species of lymnaea and Pseudosuccinea columella. The lymnaea don't match but Pseudosuccinea columella is possible. I need to check though. Any thoughts?
 
  • Thread Starter

Lucas35

Member
Yesterday I went for a walk by the river (connected to the lake) and along the shore there was lots of washed up freshwater plants. I noticed that lots of freshwater snails had also been washed up with them. It is cold and wet this time of year here so that's likely why they survived. I collected as many as I could. That lymnaeid snail I am trying to ID was the most common among the ones I collected. There was also two-ridged rams horn, nautilus rams horn, and bladder snails (they might have been dead though). I was amazed how different the different stages of the life cycle looked. The baby's looked like Stagnicola elodes, the size that I normally collect looks similar to Pseudosuccinea columella, the fully grown adults look like radix auricularia. Very confusing. I took some pictures. Also, something I've noticed this time and the other times I've collected them is that they will climb out of the water and try to crawl away for the first few days in captivity then stop.
 

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