What Live Plants Will Thrive in Hard Water and High PH?

KristenLD

Hi, I was wondering what kind of live plants could thrive in my water. I have pretty hard water with a general hardness of probably around 200. I'm just guessing though because I don't have a GH test kit and I'm basing this off of my water source's average water test results. My pH is 8.2. What plants could thrive in my water? The tank's lighting would probably be low-moderate.
 

carsonsgjs

I have anubias in 8.2ph water and it does absolutely fine.
 

logqnty

I kept Java fern, javamoss, crypts, ludwigia in hard water with a ph of about 7.8. Now that I’m injecting co2, the ph has dropped to 6.8, but they are all still doing fine
 

KristenLD

I have anubias in 8.2ph water and it does absolutely fine.
I have hard water ph of 8.2. Vals, crypts, hornwort, frogbit, salvinia natans, moss balls, and of course duckwood do well for me. I use Thrive root tabs and liquid ferts.
I kept Java fern, javamoss, crypts, ludwigia in hard water with a ph of about 7.8. Now that I’m injecting co2, the ph has dropped to 6.8, but they are all still doing fine
Thanks for the responses. I'll definitely look into those plants. I really like frogbit.

I'm planning on scaping a standard 29 gallon and I'd kind of like to do an island in the middle of the tank and maybe some sort moss for the front. Maybe weeping moss? Would weeping moss be able to withstand my water? I could also get my hands on spiky moss, creeping moss, and china moss if weeping moss isn't an option.
Also, could hygrophila corymbosa survive/thrive in my water? Thanks.
 

kansas

I forgot to mention anubius.

There's a lot going on with water chemistry I don't even try to understand. For example, christmas moss and java moss both filed in my tanks, for most people they're weeds.
 

JustAFishServant

christmas moss and java moss both filed in my tanks, for most people they're weeds.
Lol, java moss doesn't do so well in my water (soft with a pH of 6.8), but it depends on the nutrients in your water source.

KristenLD Since my tap water is from mountains and is free of chlorine, chloramine, ammonia, nitrite and heavy metals, I don't dose much of anything. However, it's low in nitrate (less than 20ppm) which is the primary source of nutrients for live plants, so I dose liquid ferts. Proper water flow is detrimental to plant growth as it increases gas exchange. CO2 increases plant growth (just so you know, CO2 will decrease your pH). For ferts, I've tried Seachem Flourish, Thrive C, Dustin's Plant Juice, Easy Green and Chemi-Pure Green. Chemi-Pure Green has activated carbon which I'm NOT a fan of. Carbon removes essential minerals, increases pH wildly, adds phosphates which algae LOVES, removes meds AND it's expensive. I think I'm good...

Seachem Flourish is okay at best, but it doesn't have the right amount of micro, macro and trace elements. Thrive C does but it's best for medium to high-light tanks. I specialize in low-light...

Aquarium Co-Op's Easy Green takes the win! It has mostly the right amount of nutrients BUT it's best for low-light! It works in soft and hard water with low and high pH, and it won't change water chemistry. It's also really cheap.

Dustin's Plant Juice is just plant steroids - it truly is that great. HOWEVER, it's $4 more than Easy Green for the same amount and you get about the same outcome. It's Easy Green for me :)

What I'm saying here is if you want plants in high pH and hard water, make sure you have the right fertilizers and species. I can't comment much on high pH and hard water because I have quite the opposite (soft, 6.8 pH) so read everyone else's suggestions above. I hope this helps, friend ;)
 

logqnty

Thanks for the responses. I'll definitely look into those plants. I really like frogbit.

I'm planning on scaping a standard 29 gallon and I'd kind of like to do an island in the middle of the tank and maybe some sort moss for the front. Maybe weeping moss? Would weeping moss be able to withstand my water? I could also get my hands on spiky moss, creeping moss, and china moss if weeping moss isn't an option.
Also, could hygrophila corymbosa survive/thrive in my water? Thanks.
Most plants can survive in ph from 6.5-7 and most reasonable harnesses as long as their fertelizer/substrate/co2/lighting needs are met and the water is clean (waste-wise). That being said, when introduced to new water conditions or being planted in the water for the first time, plants will shed. For some plants this means losing a few leaves, for others it means losing every leave. for example, my red wendtii crypt lost all of its leaves when I got it 10 days ago, but now its growing back strong.

Plants can behave very differently depending on the tank. For example, my crypts (known for being somewhat challenging) are doing fine, but my hornwort and duckweed completley died.

If I were you, I would go to your LFS and buy any and all low-med light plants that can fit into a 50$ budget. Make sure the ones that are supposed to go in the substrate have roots on them or they’ll die shortly after being planted.
 

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