What Kind Of Tetra Are These?

Discussion in 'Tetras' started by Vichu, Apr 11, 2017.

  1. Vichu

    Vichu Valued Member Member

    [​IMG]
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    look at their genetical modifications
     
  2. GlamCrab

    GlamCrab Well Known Member Member

    Those are no genetical modification.. They were painted/they stuck a needle in them and put ink inside them. (The neon tetra are natural tho)
     
  3. GlamCrab

    GlamCrab Well Known Member Member

    I think they are idian glassfish. (To answer the question) its usually those fish that get 'painted'
     




  4. aquatickeeper

    aquatickeeper Fishlore VIP Member

    Poor fish.
     
  5. OP
    OP
    Vichu

    Vichu Valued Member Member

    Loved their colors while I saw in my LFS but now I hate the idiots. They are selling this pair for 4 dollars here in india. Too much for these fishes !
     
  6. NavigatorBlack

    NavigatorBlack Fishlore VIP Member

    They are sold all over the world - a fluorescent dye injected into a colourless fish.
     
  7. GlamCrab

    GlamCrab Well Known Member Member

    oh wow lol, well.. i guess they upped the price because of the risk that comes with 'painting' the fish (it can kill them, shorten their lifespan. eventually they loose the color. ect..) and they probably found that poeple were willing to pay more for these when colored like that.
     
  8. Alhana

    Alhana Valued Member Member

    Its been a really long time since I've seen those for sale but when they use to sell them a lot the other complaint people had was the color faded eventually.
     
  9. brousecasey12

    brousecasey12 Well Known Member Member

    They are Indian glass arrowheads! ( spelling may be wrong or name may be wrong but it's something like that) I was intrigued by them and bought them as well! Even though I bought them for their color, I love the way they look now! They're clear and different than usual fish. It's awesome! I do wish the dye would have stayed, but it's the biggest blessing in disguise! Also, I don't support the dying but wanted to let you know what they look!
    This is what they look like now! They're probably like 4 to 5 months old now!
    [​IMG]
     
  10. aquatickeeper

    aquatickeeper Fishlore VIP Member

    I guess "painters" are too lazy to use genetics.
     
  11. GlamCrab

    GlamCrab Well Known Member Member

    it costs less money to create and less time. (i guess) + poeple pay for them
     
  12. OP
    OP
    Vichu

    Vichu Valued Member Member

    The thing which attracted me most is that double dorsal fin!
     
  13. saket

    saket Valued Member Member

    we get them everywhere a pair for 20rs(in dollars probably less than half a dollar) i am so amazed how do they paint them. poor fish though.
     
  14. -Mak-

    -Mak- Well Known Member Member

    Yikes. From what I've heard they're injected with needles and get infections and die quite easily. Human greed without regard for other animals at its finest.
     
  15. chromedome52

    chromedome52 Fishlore VIP Member

    Actually, those are literally painted. It was one of the first fish that were modified in this way. The flourescent paint was invented to mark trout and salmon so that they could be tracked through fish ladders around dams. The application of the paint requires scraping the slime from the fish, which opens them to infections. The paint itself eventually peels off, so if the fish survives that, they will be normal. TFH magazine had an article about this back when it started, and there were photos of fish in the process of having the paint peel off. Dyed fish do not have the color peel off, it just gradually fades, and sometimes it doesn't fade completely away.
     
  16. aquatickeeper

    aquatickeeper Fishlore VIP Member

    And never buy "painted fish" ever again! You are supporting the "painting" industry.
     




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