What Is This Brown Stuff?

DuaneV

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I dont see what youre seeing, but you wont see bacteria growing on things. More than likely its algae.
 
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matt 63

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DuaneV said:
I dont see what youre seeing, but you wont see bacteria growing on things. More than likely its algae.
Ok my phone don't take very good pictures thanks

Lorekeeper said:
Looks like diatoms.
What is that?

JamieXPXP said:
it looks like brown algae
Ok thanks
 

fjh

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Growing on the statues head and on the roof of the building looks like brown algae
 
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matt 63

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fjh said:
Growing on the statues head and on the roof of the building looks like brown algae
Ok thank you is this bad for tank?
 

Jenoli42

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matt 63 said:
Ok thank you is this bad for tank?
no, it's actually quite healthy for most tanks. our fish love having it growing...more than we do! lolz it can get unsightly. so you can easily remove it with your weekly maintenance or you can look at some of the causes.

most common underlying causes could be: too much nutrient in the water (eg, excess food, silica from substrate or decor, fert for plants) OR too much direct sunlight (or lights being on for more than 6-8 hours daily). there are other causes... just google it or find a relevant thread on this forum
 
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matt 63

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Jenoli42 said:
no, it's actually quite healthy for most tanks. our fish love having it growing...more than we do! lolz it can get unsightly. so you can easily remove it with your weekly maintenance or you can look at some of the causes.

most common underlying causes could be: too much nutrient in the water (eg, excess food, silica from substrate or decor, fert for plants) OR too much direct sunlight (or lights being on for more than 6-8 hours daily). there are other causes... just google it or find a relevant thread on this forum
Ok i think its cause of the light being on to much, cause I turn it on before I go to work and cut it off before I go to sleep which is about 16 hours, I really appreciate your help
 

Jenoli42

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matt 63 said:
Ok i think its cause of the light being on to much, cause I turn it on before I go to work and cut it off before I go to sleep which is about 16 hours, I really appreciate your help
ah! yes, that is likely to be an underlying cause, then. may i suggest you turn the lights on in the morning as normal, but turn them back off while you're at work? (on non work days, try 4 hours then a break then another 4 hours)

the key here is if you get home in the dark, you need to gradually increase the light in the tank rather than just flicking a switch (that can shock the fish...one of our rummy noses nearly died simply because we turned the lights on after a movie night...it went pale and twitchy and we were horrified). some people use timers and/or dimmers.

we get home after dark in fall/winter. we turn on the light in the room next door first, and light spills to both rooms that have tanks. then we turn on the next light in the open space across from the rummies after about 10 minutes. then we can flick the main room lights on after about 5-10 more minutes. then we can turn on the tank lights directly (again, 5-10 mins unless they're "awake" and swimming already). we don't have dimmers or timers, so we just use a gradual system. and they know it's dinner time after we turn on the tank lights once we're home, so they're active and happy once they're awake.
 

fjh

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matt 63 said:
Ok thank you is this bad for tank?
No, its fine. It absorbes nitrates and stuff from the water (which is good) and also provides food for inverts and some fish. However it can be unsightly and can quickly clog up filters.
 
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matt 63

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Jenoli42 said:
ah! yes, that is likely to be an underlying cause, then. may i suggest you turn the lights on in the morning as normal, but turn them back off while you're at work? (on non work days, try 4 hours then a break then another 4 hours)

the key here is if you get home in the dark, you need to gradually increase the light in the tank rather than just flicking a switch (that can shock the fish...one of our rummy noses nearly died simply because we turned the lights on after a movie night...it went pale and twitchy and we were horrified). some people use timers and/or dimmers.

we get home after dark in fall/winter. we turn on the light in the room next door first, and light spills to both rooms that have tanks. then we turn on the next light in the open space across from the rummies after about 10 minutes. then we can flick the main room lights on after about 5-10 more minutes. then we can turn on the tank lights directly (again, 5-10 mins unless they're "awake" and swimming already). we don't have dimmers or timers, so we just use a gradual system. and they know it's dinner time after we turn on the tank lights once we're home, so they're active and happy once they're awake.
Ok i will definitely do that then, I have noticed that when I turn on the lights in the morning, they are usally hiding and takes a while to come out but I did what you was talking about this morning and they didn't seem shocked or anything when I cut on the tank light, thank you for the advice
 

jdhef

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Diatoms (brown algae), unlike green algae, actually prefer less light. While unsightly, they are harmless and will go away on their own eventually.
 
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matt 63

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jdhef said:
Diatoms (brown algae), unlike green algae, actually prefer less light. While unsightly, they are harmless and will go away on their own eventually.
OK thank you
 
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