What Is This And How Would I Go About Getting Rid Of It?

TexasDomer

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Looks like diatoms with the beginning of cyanobacteria.

Can you give us some more info?

How long do you leave the lights on? Any direct sunlight?

How old is this tank setup?

For now, you can manually remove the algae (give the plants a quick rub with your fingers) before doing a water change.
 
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JackA99

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Lights on generally 9 hours a day. It is not heavily stocked. 50% water changes weekly. Tank setup is about 8 months but I rescaped and changed substrate two months ago.
I can give any other needed information. Also no natural sunlight hits this tank.
 

TexasDomer

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The change in substrate could have brought in more silicates, causing the diatom bloom. It should go away as the silicates are used up.
 
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JackA99

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AquaticJ said:
Cut back the lights to 6 hours. Do you have a water test kit? Additionally, you could have high phosphates.
I have a test kit that I can use will post testings here as soon as possible. How would I know if I had high phosphates.
Neutral-Waterinos said:
How strong is the light that you use?
I don't know exactly it is just one that came with a 20 gallon starter kit so I know it is not that strong. I can try to find the exact light info if that could help me.

Good to know about the silicates. Hopefully them being used up combined with toning the lights back will help. I can give more info or pictures if needed.
 
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JackA99

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Ok thanks. I will keep the thread updated with how cutting the lights back does.
 

CraniumRex

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Cyanobacteria is the blue-green blobs - and it is often super tough to get rid of. It typically comes off in sheets and it SMELLS AWFUL. Sorry for the all caps but bleah, it reeks like the back end of a swamp monster.:hungover:

I had it in my 10g with low light and am still fighting it. I can tell when it's about to come on again when I get silver bubbles on things - hard to describe, sorry.

Some people have used a chemical treatment to get rid of it - I'm hesitant to use any chemicals but I've been fighting it for months, and only in one tank (not sure why but won't question it!).

Lots of regular water changes and rubbing it off regularly helps.
 

SFGiantsGuy

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Yeah cynobacteria is a pain. It DOES have a nasty, distinct smell, and there are next to no aquairum creatures that will actually consume it either. Remeber that cyanobacteria is NOT an algae. You can also vacuum the stuff up as well, to help getting rid of it some.
 

jdhef

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Since cynobacteria is actually a bacteria and not an algae, some people have gotten rid of it by dosing their tank with an antibiotic fish med.

I also believe some people have eradicated it by spot treating with hydrogen peroxide, but I'm not sure how they actually accomplish the spot treatment.
 
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JackA99

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Update: I have cut back on both light and feeding and my problem seems to of stayed the same maybe of got a little worst. By hand the stuff is hard to remove by hand and in some areas it is starting to be stringy. Thinking of trying a chemical treatment if anyone has one to suggest. Any other suggestion of getting rid of it is greatly appreciated. I can post more pictures if needed.
 

TexasDomer

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How long is the lighting on now?

I would not use any chemicals to treat the algae unless it's cyanobacteria - it doesn't solve the root of the issue and the algae could easily come back. Some algaecides are toxic, too.
 
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JackA99

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TexasDomer said:
How long is the lighting on now?

I would not use any chemicals to treat the algae unless it's cyanobacteria - it doesn't solve the root of the issue and the algae could easily come back. Some algaecides are toxic, too.
Good to know about algaecides being toxic. Right now the lights are on for 7 hours a day. Down from 10-11 before. I am planning to get a light timer soon though so I can change my light schedule to help with this if it is needed.
 

TexasDomer

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Is it still the same algae as before? Or are you getting new types, different from the original pic?
 
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JackA99

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Seems to be the same it has not really spread from where it was before. It seems to have become thicker in certain places and just in general not showed a response to anything I have tried.
 

TexasDomer

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Diatoms should go away once the silicates in your tank are used up. You can keep removing them manually before water changes, too.
 

wodesorel

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Did you try a blackout yet? I had this in my plant grow out tank and blacking out for a week after a friend suggested it really put a dent in it. Lots of physical cleaning as well using disposable gloves.

Once I moved the plants into my community tank it was gone for good. I think I can thank my clown plecos for that, but it may just have been the lower light and no Flourite base.
 
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JackA99

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TexasDomer said:
Diatoms should go away once the silicates in your tank are used up. You can keep removing them manually before water changes, too.
Ok thanks. I think it is diatom algae I have just never seen it behave like it is currently but it does fit he same characteristics so I will just keep up with what I have been doing and hope it passes.

I have thought about doing a blackout but am worried about how my plants will fair.
 
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