what is everything I need to know about spotted cories before I get them Help 

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ANGEL_Z

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Im going to get some spotted cories in a week or two and I would like to know a couple of things about them...
They will be in a 10 galon tank(us gallons) with 3 platies and 1 guppy.
My ph sometimes goes up to like 7.8 so is that okay?
1)how big do they get?
2)will they accept hikari algae wafers?
3)how often should I ffed them algae wafers?
4)how will they do in gravel?
5)how do they breed?
6)are they good fish for beginners?
7)are they sensitive to water parameters?
My tank is only like a month and 2 weeks old by the way.
It is cycled there is a filter heater air pump hood and there is gravel that's not that sharp there is also a cave and a log tunnel for them to hide and like 5 fake plants.
So can you please give me some advice on spotted cories. I am only getting 3 by the way
 

Jaysee

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IMO corys don't belong in a 10 gallon tank.
 

ayelie

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Do you mean Peppered Cory?? If so you might want to try this link for info.
 
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ANGEL_Z

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I don't think its peppered cories because at petco it says spotted cory not peppered.
And cories can live in 10 gallon tank jaysee
 

Regal

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A ten is really too small but if you do get them get shrimp pellets not algae wafers
 

Jaysee

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I didn't say that they couldn't live in a 10 gallon. I said it was my opinion that they shouldn't be kept in one.
 

phishyitis

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Corys like to be in a school of 5 or more and they need to have a tank with a bigger footprint than a 10 gallon to be happy.Sorry if that isn't one of the questions you asked.
 

Akari_32

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phishyitis said:
Corys like to be in a school of 5 or more and they need to have a tank with a bigger footprint than a 10 gallon to be happy.Sorry if that isn't one of the questions you asked.
i think a standard school of corries that get 2+ inches like at least 30 gallons.... i would like to say tho, im gunna do a school of 5 in a 20 long, but its going to be very, very planted.
 
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ryanr

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Hi ANGEL, welcome to fishlore.

Most species of cory are somewhat sensitive to water parameters, and as a general rule, should only be introduced to an established (>3mths, preferably 6mths or more).

The will do better in a group, and you should be prepared for when they outgrow your 10 gallon.

Hope this helps.
 

Regal

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ANGEL_Z said:
I don't think its peppered cories because at petco it says spotted cory not peppered.
And cories can live in 10 gallon tank jaysee
You asked the 7 questions you did because you don't know much about Corydora. Basic questions like yours (food, size, tank conditions etc.) show you want to create a good environment for your fish and that's good. However, If you don't accept the advice of people who know more than you (food, size, tank conditions - the most basic stuff) how will you ever gain more information than what you already know?
 

Jaysee

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ANGEL_Z said:
Im going to get some spotted cories in a week or two and I would like to know a couple of things about them...
They will be in a 10 galon tank(us gallons) with 3 platies and 1 guppy.
My ph sometimes goes up to like 7.8 so is that okay?
1)how big do they get?
2)will they accept hikari algae wafers?
3)how often should I ffed them algae wafers?
4)how will they do in gravel?
5)how do they breed?
6)are they good fish for beginners?
7)are they sensitive to water parameters?
My tank is only like a month and 2 weeks old by the way.
It is cycled there is a filter heater air pump hood and there is gravel that's not that sharp there is also a cave and a log tunnel for them to hide and like 5 fake plants.
So can you please give me some advice on spotted cories. I am only getting 3 by the way
1). 2-2.5 inches
2). Yes
3). Once a day
4). not as well as with sand, but it's not like they'll die with gravel.
5). they lay eggs on broad leaf plants, as well as the glass.
6). Corys can be sensitive, so yes and no. They are not good for beginners that are still experiencing fish loss.
7). Yes. They have trouble in tanks with repeated minicycles.

8). "Spotted cory" is not the actual name of the fish.
9). Your tank is not mature enough for corys right now.
 
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ryanr

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Jaysee said:
1). 2-2.5 inches
8). "Spotted cory" is not the actual name of the fish.
Sorry Jaysee, maybe I'm confused, but the link I posted is for a "Spotted Cory"

Spotted corydoras, longnose corydoras or Agassiz's catfish = Corydoras ambiacus

Peppered Cory Cat = Corydoras paleatus

I confused now ???
 

sirdarksol

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Angel Z has requested that we stick to the questions asked. They have been given plenty of information regarding tank size, and it is up to them whether or not they want to accept that advice. Let's focus on the questions that were asked from this point on.

Size depends on species. I've seen cories that barely get larger than an inch, and I've seen cories that get to be six inches. Spotted cories (which covers a number of species) seem to range between 1.5" and 2.5"
Yes, they will accept algae wafers. They love shrimp pellets, too. In many cases, the majority of their food is going to be leftovers from the other fish.
They do pretty good in gravel. Rounded gravel is better than sharp-edged, and small or medium is better than large.
They breed after having been conditioned on live foods. The species will determine where the female deposits her eggs. All cory eggs are sticky to some extent, and she will attach them to the surface. Cories are horrible parents, and will eat their own eggs. Either eggs or parents need to be moved to a second tank for any decent amount of fry to be born. All of this being said, it is extremely unlikely, to the point of impossibility, to breed cories in a 10 gallon, non-species-only, tank.
Cories are a bit sensitive, and can be difficult for a beginner to take care of. The slightest hike in nitrogen in the tank can be fatal to the little guys.
 

Jaysee

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My mistake. I've seen several different corys labeled as "spotted".
 

Meenu

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I always fed my cories shrimp pellets and some sinking granules. Didn't use algae wafers.
 

Kyle

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sirdarksol said:
A

They breed after having been conditioned on live foods.
Just to add as well that for a lot of the cory species, after they have been conditioned as sirdarksol correctly says, breeding is also 'triggered' by a drop in temperature. the Author of the handbook I have for example kept their breeding tanks at 21 degrees Centigrade and when the fish looked ready they would allow the temperature to drop throughout the day and night to 16 degrees, which would encourage their spawning. From what I remember (and correct me anyone if im not remembering correctly or thinking of something else) the temperature drop mimics rainfall, and they seem to be disposed to breed during the rain heavy seasons. The way most people who wish to breed do this (because it's kind of difficult to cool your tank any other way) is by doing a colder water change.
 

Treefork

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My basic cory staple food is shrimp pellets and algae wafers. They consume both with vigour. They will also take bloodworms and other sinking foods. They're not picky and it wouldn't hurt to vary their diet. 3 will be fine in a 10 gallon. You may not see as much activity as you would though. I had cories in a 10 for about 2 years, then I moved them to a 30 and the activity level increased dramatically.
 

sirdarksol

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Kyle said:
Just to add as well that for a lot of the cory species, after they have been conditioned as sirdarksol correctly says, breeding is also 'triggered' by a drop in temperature. the Author of the handbook I have for example kept their breeding tanks at 21 degrees Centigrade and when the fish looked ready they would allow the temperature to drop throughout the day and night to 16 degrees, which would encourage their spawning. From what I remember (and correct me anyone if im not remembering correctly or thinking of something else) the temperature drop mimics rainfall, and they seem to be disposed to breed during the rain heavy seasons. The way most people who wish to breed do this (because it's kind of difficult to cool your tank any other way) is by doing a colder water change.
You are correct. There are also numerous other triggers, which vary from species to species, but temperature is pretty much across-the-board for cories.
 
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