What fish to Avoid???

AcuarioAmazonico

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mimo91088 said:
Did I understand correctly, are you saying to avoid mystery snails?

What's happening in this thread, am I taking crazy pills? Lol, but in all seriousness im liking the different opinions in here. I feel like debating this stuff is good for the hobby as a whole. I know I for one learn a whole lot from a bit of healthy disagreement all the time.

But I have to say, mystery snails are another of my favorites lol
lord no!

I’m saying that I’m surprised peoole say to avoid sae. Cae yes but sae have always been peaceful and forgettable/ put them in a tank and not think of them again. Just like mystery snails. I like mystery snails. Bright yellow ones lookl great in a tank!
 

SM1199

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mimo91088 said:
I respect you and your experience a lot, but I'm going to disagree. And I fully realize the collective internet is going to roll their eyes and say "this guy is dumb" to me. The fish that I had that
I posted about in the survivors thread, who lived through the long cold power outage were balloon mollies. They lived through what would have outright killed most fish with no ill effects whatsoever. I never saw anything that would lead me to believe their quality of life was any lesser.

I know you deal with rams a lot, and I have no idea about balloon ram genetics. Those might be terrible. But I loved my balloon mollies and I'd buy them again in a heartbeat. I still have one with my guppy colony.
I'm just curious - and no, I'm not rolling my eyes, just genuinely curious - did you also have regular mollies that DIDN'T survive the power outage? Because it probably wasn't the fact that they were balloons that helped them survive, it was probably just that mollies in general survive tough times. And if they are otherwise completely equal in health, I'd still choose the regular mollies because I prefer the natural, non-swimming-impaired forms of most fish, just like I prefer plakat bettas and fish that don't glow :D Theoretically, balloon fish don't have enough room for their organs and will eventually suffer. It's one of those things that it seems okay until it's not, but by the time it's not, it's dead. It will just seem like death from old age where a non-balloon might have lasted an extra year or two.

I also have never heard of balloon rams until now :eek:
 

FinalFins

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heres one- aripima.

Whoops, hit post too fast, and meant to put in quote too, so here goes
mimo91088 said:
I respect you and your experience a lot, but I'm going to disagree. And I fully realize the collective internet is going to roll their eyes and say "this guy is dumb" to me. The fish that I had that
I posted about in the survivors thread, who lived through the long cold power outage were balloon mollies. They lived through what would have outright killed most fish with no ill effects whatsoever. I never saw anything that would lead me to believe their quality of life was any lesser.

I know you deal with rams a lot, and I have no idea about balloon ram genetics. Those might be terrible. But I loved my balloon mollies and I'd buy them again in a heartbeat. I still have one with my guppy colony.
i belive the reason coralbandit simply put down ballon mollies is because of their shape, and that man breeds them to have curved spines, severely putting a dent in their health.
 

mimo91088

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I understand why people don't like them. I know all the reasons they're supposed to be less healthy. I just mean I haven't found that to be the case firsthand. I'm not claiming they're more healthy than regular mollies at all. That would be foolish. I'm just saying that I think the health impacts are very minimal and it's one of those things that people overstate quite a bit. Are regular mollies more healthy? Sure. But that doesn't make balloons weak. I never noticed a difference in quality of life or overall lifespan, and I've kept plenty of both kind.
 

BobbyTez

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I would love to have an arowana but unless you going to have a 200 gallon tank or above stay away
 

AcuarioAmazonico

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BobbyTez said:
I would love to have an arowana but unless you going to have a 200 gallon tank or above stay away
same here. And apart from the fact that most are illegal here without microchips.

I did have an Australian Arowana for one day :)
 
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kallililly1973

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I'd take an Oscar or JD over an Arowana anyday.They are amazing fish but would rather have an Oscar in a 200
 

BobbyTez

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kallililly1973 said:
I'd take an Oscar or JD over an Arowana anyday.They are amazing fish but would rather have an Oscar in a 200
Oscars and JD are cool but an arowana grows about 4 times there size I seen some at a aquarium in a Chinese restaurant and I go there to eat just to look at the arowanas.
 
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kallililly1973

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BobbyTez said:
Oscars and JD are cool but an arowana grows about 4 times there size I seen some at a aquarium in a Chinese restaurant and I go there to eat just to look at the arowanas.
I agree they are awesome fish no doubt. But if i had a 200 it would be an Oscar tank. just my personal preference. My not so LFS has a huge silver and its an amazing fish but i think it should be in a 500 or larger gallon tank,
 

AcuarioAmazonico

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kallililly1973 said:
I'd take an Oscar or JD over an Arowana anyday.They are amazing fish but would rather have an Oscar in a 200
in a 200 surely you’d have both? :)

And agree, Arowana are fine in 200 for a year or two - but eventually you want them in 500g massive display tanks or ponds :)
 

mimo91088

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kallililly1973 said:
I'd take an Oscar or JD over an Arowana anyday.They are amazing fish but would rather have an Oscar in a 200
I can't wait to have room for an oscar tank. Bucket list fish for me.
 

A201

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Avoid Convict Cichlids! Although they are a nice looking species, there are drawbacks. A mated pair will totally dominate half a tank while on a nest, and also bite your hand during WC's.
They are such prolific breeders that you can't even give the fry away. Lol.

Note: the Green Terror (Rivulatus) was listed as a fish to avoid in an above listed post. IMO, GT's are one of the best "must have" cichlids. I've kept several male GT's. They are really pretty cichlids, not particularly aggressive, but like any fish will eat what ever they can swallow. Who wouldn't want one of these? Minimum 75 gallon tank.
20191214_210328.jpg
 

AcuarioAmazonico

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A201 said:
Avoid Convict Cichlids! Although they are a nice looking species, there are drawbacks. A mated pair will totally dominate half a tank while on a nest, and also bite your hand during WC's.
They are such prolific breeders that you can't even give the fry away. Lol.

Note: the Green Terror (Rivulatus) was listed as a fish to avoid in an above listed post. IMO, GT's are one of the best "must have" cichlids. I've kept several male GT's. They are really pretty cichlids, not particularly aggressive, but like any fish will eat what ever they can swallow. Who wouldn't want one of these? Minimum 75 gallon tank.
I agree with half and disagree with the other half of you comment :)

I love my green terror even though he’s still tiny. Can’t wait for him to be fully grown!

Re: convicts - I think they’re great. They’re beautiful looking fish. I have a male and a female together in a nice tank - with no other tank mates, not even a snail :) - so for that: not too fussed on them taking the tank hahaha.

I haven't had them try to bite me yet - but if they did I wouldn’t be too bothered. Imagine a big hand-came into your house - you’d nite it too! Hahahaha

oscars and blood parrots swim up to your hand: not to bite but to get the food first :)
 

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I saw this thread before and thinking it over I was not going to post anything here (since most would just qualify for "keep in the right set-ups/expert care only" but after having read some of the recent replies, I do have something to add.

- Long-finned betta. In particular rosetails and feathertails, but *also* halfmoons, double tails, veilteils, and long-finned varieties in general. To a lesser extent also crowntails. Betta lovers can hate for it but after having just one long-finned (and it was a lighter-weight crowntail!) male betta compared to the 25 or so different adult bettas I've had (not counting my own spawns) that were all short or half-length varieties, geez. I get why every other person who owns a betta is struggling with fin rot. What a nightmare. The poor animals are clearly hampered (not just in living standard, but also in terms of health and immunity) by these bred-in appendages. Technically the females are fine but you can't have females without males...
- Dwarfs Gourami. As mentioned, I cannot in good conscience buy a dwarf, even though they were the first gourami that ever caught my eye in a shop and I'd love to own one. Maybe the only scenario to consider would be buying two older, healthy, unrelated specimens from aquarists that have had them for a good while and breed those yourself. Even then it might be too late to fix this mess unless with a new influx of wild genes..
 

AcuarioAmazonico

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PascalKrypt

Alas, I agree. I started with dwarf gourami when I came back to the hobby. That said they just are not the breed they were when I was young. My LFS even confided in me (in private) that when they get their delivery at least 10% are already dead! Not a day Passes where the staff don’t turn up for work and don’t have to scoop out the dead / dying DG. The fact that they’ll just infect others means even though I have bought DG in the last 6 weeks; my current stock is it and I won't be replacing them. :(
 

MissPanda

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mimo91088 said:
I respect you and your experience a lot, but I'm going to disagree. And I fully realize the collective internet is going to roll their eyes and say "this guy is dumb" to me. The fish that I had that
I posted about in the survivors thread, who lived through the long cold power outage were balloon mollies. They lived through what would have outright killed most fish with no ill effects whatsoever. I never saw anything that would lead me to believe their quality of life was any lesser.

I know you deal with rams a lot, and I have no idea about balloon ram genetics. Those might be terrible. But I loved my balloon mollies and I'd buy them again in a heartbeat. I still have one with my guppy colony.

I'm interested to see how mine turns out. I have a balloon ram and I adore him so much. First time with a balloon fish and he's fairly new, so I'll see how things turn out. I've read that they die sooner, but I hope not. I want more than a year with him, his personality is the best.
 

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I have no idea why fish stores even sell red tail catfish. Those monstrosities grow to such a size that I'm convinced that only public aquariums can properly accommodate them. Keeping them in a fish tank is out of the question, and most people's outdoor backyard ponds aren't big enough either. Plus they'd probably eat any nice-looking koi that could be living in there...
 

MacZ

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AcuarioAmazonico said:
im really interested to hear about this aggressive side.I’ve always kind of forgotten about my SAE
The guy I got my cardinals from still has that SAE. Moderately planted tank, tankmates: 2 Angels, 4 quite big clown loaches, originally 10 cardinals without problems for 2 years. Everything went fine until he added the SAE in early 2019. It was already about 12cm when added. Then the number of cardinals dwindled down to 3.
I watched how that went, before I suggested myself to take the surviving cardinals. SAE sat in the plants waiting for a cardinal to swim/drift closer. The SAE would jump at the tetra, nibbling its sides and fins, chasing it 1-4 times across the full length of the tank (120cm), before getting back into the plants and waiting for the next chance. Those tetras were a mess behaviourwise the first few weeks after I got them in my tank.

Edit: It now goes for the Angels sometimes, but stays out of the way of the loaches. Also important: Not my tank, there maybe a reason I cannot know at this point behind it.
 

SM1199

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PascalKrypt said:
- Long-finned betta. In particular rosetails and feathertails, but *also* halfmoons, double tails, veilteils, and long-finned varieties in general. To a lesser extent also crowntails. Betta lovers can hate for it but after having just one long-finned (and it was a lighter-weight crowntail!) male betta compared to the 25 or so different adult bettas I've had (not counting my own spawns) that were all short or half-length varieties, geez. I get why every other person who owns a betta is struggling with fin rot. What a nightmare. The poor animals are clearly hampered (not just in living standard, but also in terms of health and immunity) by these bred-in appendages. Technically the females are fine but you can't have females without males...
I completely agree. I lost my first betta to fin-biting to relieve himself of the weight of his own fins. No matter how clean I kept the water or how much of his environment I changed or improved (he was in a filtered/heated 10 gallon right from the start), nothing I could do changed his mind. Eventually his tail fin was half as long as it should have been after months and months of fin-biting and it eventually got infected. In my desperation, after months of trying other things, I resorted to antibiotics and not even that could save him. He's my profile picture, when he was still young and very healthy. He had the most character of any betta I ever had. I'm still heartbroken over him - he was an impulse buy that turned me into a betta lover when before I had never even considered keeping them. I suspect when he was young and highly energetic his fins didn't bother him, but as he got older, the weight irritated him more and more to the point he couldn't stop his fin biting.

My plakat male, on the other hand, is about a year and a half old now and looking and acting just as fantastic as he did when I first got him. There have been a couple times he managed to rip his fins on hornwort (I have since moved those plants to a different tank) but they'd be completely healed by the next morning. He is a real character, and incredibly gorgeous - in my opinion, more so than any long-tailed variety. I've loved watching his minor color changes. When I first got him, he had some white scales sprinkled over his body and fins, which is what initially drew me to him. Those white scales slowly transitioned to sparkling light blue scales - his body is a navy blue - and now it looks like he's had blue glitter sprinkled over him. Such a cool fish.
 

NavyChief20

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SM1199 said:
I don't have any experience with particularly large community fish or cichlids, but Dustin's Fish Tanks posted a couple videos on "Top 5 aquarium fish with the worst personalities" and "Top 6 most p***ed off aquarium fish" particularly aimed at large fish not suitable for a community.

His answers:
Clown knife fish, dovii cichlid, red bellied piranha, Australian rainbow fish, skunk botia loach, Jack Dempsey cichlid, alligator gar, oscar, wolf fish, green terror cichlid, and red devil cichlid.

Of course, these are not my opinions as I don't have any experience with the above fish, and there can be exceptions to some of these as with all fish. Just relaying them :)
Lol i have all those cichlids. They are awesome fish and have lots of personality.
 
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