What Do Parameters And Water Conditions Mean?

adh/smile

Member
HI!
I am new to the freshwater aquarium keeping and I have researched about water conditions and parameters such as ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, PH, DH, and GH. I know about the nitrogen cycle and how that works and use plain tap water with no water conditioning whatsoever. Can someone please explain what PH, DH, and GH is and is it important to have a water conditioning?
 

BottomDweller

Member
Yes, very important to have water conditioning. It removes stuff from the tap water that is very harmful to the fish. One of the things it removes is chlorine. Chlorine kills the beneficial bacteria that grows in the filter and turns the ammonia into nitrite then nitrate so with chlorine in the tank your tank would never cycle. Water conditioner is essential.

Ph is how acidic or alkaline the water is.
 

Mardymustard1

Member
Water conditioner for your tank is very immportant. Tap safe or conditioner removes harmful chemicals commonly found in tap water such as chlorine and eliminate ammonia. I really reccomend you get some water conditioner as soon as possible otherwise tap water will kill your fish. When using conditioner always follow the guidelines on how much to dose and never overdose that amount.
 

aquatickeeper

Member
I've never heard of DH before do you mean KH (carbonate hardness)? KH connects to your PH and if KH is <5 DKH, wide PH swings will happen
 
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adh/smile

Member
Thank you for your quick responses! I will definitely get some water conditioner ASAP!
aquatickeeper said:
I've never heard of DH before do you mean (carbonate hardness)? KH connects to your PH and if KH is <5 DKH, wide PH swings will happen
I don't know what DH is. I have an "Aquarium Owner's Guide" book and there is a lot of information on fish and there were lists of ranges of pH and dH in the book by each breed of fish. That way if you're making a community tank you can make sure the ranges of different breeds of fish are the same. I've never heard of the things you mentioned.
 

Live Love Aquatic Life

Member
I honestly don't think you need to worry about that as a beginner aquarist. Some fish are more sensitive to it than others, so make sure you pick hardy fish for your first tank.

Also, water conditioner is very important. Without it, chlorine and chloramines will be in your tank, and those hurt fish to the point where it can be fatal.
 
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jdhef

Moderator
Member
adh/smile said:
I don't know what DH is. I have an "Aquarium Owner's Guide" book and there is a lot of information on fish and there were lists of ranges of pH and dH in the book by each breed of fish.
If I had to guess, I would guess that in the book dH meant degrees hardness. Here is a link to a thread that explains gH and kH

Normally it's not something you need to worry too much about, but a low kH can lead to pH swings which can kill fish, so sometimes it good to know what you kH and gH are.
 
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adh/smile

Member
Live Love Aquatic Life said:
I honestly don't think you need to worry about that as a beginner aquarist. Some fish are more sensitive to it than others, so make sure you pick hardy fish for your first tank.

Also, water conditioner is very important. Without it, chlorine and chloramines will be in your tank, and those hurt fish to the point where it can be fatal.
4-5 years ago when I first started keeping betta fish I tested my tap water to see if fish could live in it and it was fine so that's what I've been going off of ever since and so I've never used any conditioner.
Ok, so I will try not to worry about it too much but would it still be a good idea to get a nitrogen cycling kit to test ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate levels?

jdhef said:
If I had to guess, I would guess that in the book dH meant degrees hardness. Here is a link to a thread that explains gH and kH

Normally it's not something you need to worry too much about, but a low kH can lead to pH swings which can kill fish, so sometimes it good to know what you kH and gH are.
Sorry, I didn't get that link you tried to send.
 
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adh/smile

Member
Live Love Aquatic Life said:
I recommend the API Freshwater Master Test Kit.
I will definitely get that!

Everyone has been so helpful, thank you all so much!
 
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