Help What can keep aquarium at 0.25 ammonia after water change?

Fuz

New Member
Messages
39
Reaction score
14
Points
8
Experience
Just started
Maybe I'm off but it looks like 0.25 ammonia. No fish, just a mystery snail. I've done a few water changes. I purchased three danio. However, I made a fatal flaw. I didn't look up the dangerous amount for nitrates and placed them in there when it was 30 ppm. Tank was cycled from what I saw. I have a media bag, sponge, filter floss, and a sponge filter cover. The two danio died overnight and the third died shortly after that sadly. Any help is appreciated! I feel miserable about putting those fish through that. I even waited a month before getting fish.

Last minute edit: i also have a bunch of live plants.
 

Kiks

Well Known Member
Messages
1,194
Reaction score
509
Points
148
Experience
5 to 10 years
30 ppm nitrates isn't dangerous to danios. I'm 99% sure that's not why they died.

The API test kit has a tendency to look slightly like .25 ppm ammonia when it's in fact 0. Many have test kits with this flaw that makes it look like their ammonia is always at .25 ppm.

How did you cycle the tank?
Have you tested for nitrites?

Sorry about your fish.
 

vyrille

Well Known Member
Messages
549
Reaction score
265
Points
73
Experience
5 to 10 years
30ppm nitrates? 30ppm is very unlikely to be fatal, especially for danio. In my earlier clueless days i have kept fish alive in 80-100ppm of nitrates for months.

How did you cycle your tank? sometimes it could be difficult to differentiate 0 from 0.25 ppm ammonia in the API liquid test kit, is that what you're using?
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #4

Fuz

New Member
Messages
39
Reaction score
14
Points
8
Experience
Just started
30 ppm nitrates isn't dangerous to danios. I'm 99% sure that's not why they died.

The API test kit has a tendency to look slightly like .25 ppm ammonia when it's in fact 0. Many have test kits with this flaw that makes it look like their ammonia is always at .25 ppm.

How did you cycle the tank?
Have you tested for nitrites?

Sorry about your fish.
30ppm nitrates? 30ppm is very unlikely to be fatal, especially for danio. In my earlier clueless days i have kept fish alive in 80-100ppm of nitrates for months.

How did you cycle your tank? sometimes it could be difficult to differentiate 0 from 0.25 ppm ammonia in the API liquid test kit, is that what you're using?

Yes the tank has been cycled, I used Dr Tim's Ammonia drops and bacteria. I am using API'S liquid test kit. Results are: KH 4 GH 8 Ammonia 0.25? Nitrites 0 Nitrates 5 PH 7.4?
 

vyrille

Well Known Member
Messages
549
Reaction score
265
Points
73
Experience
5 to 10 years
Your parameters seem okay. The ammonia reading could just be erroneous (it happens a lot, because the colour shades are difficult to tell apart), and even if it wasn't, normal healthy danios can easily truck through 0.25ppm ammonia, as well as 30ppm nitrates, so i doubt it's the water. Did they look sick? Any spots, streaks, ulcers, erratic behaviour, etc? How did you acclimate them? Or perhaps you just have a bad batch/they were at their limits already before you got them..
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #6

Fuz

New Member
Messages
39
Reaction score
14
Points
8
Experience
Just started
Your parameters seem okay. The ammonia reading could just be erroneous (it happens a lot, because the colour shades are difficult to tell apart), and even if it wasn't, normal healthy danios can easily truck through 0.25ppm ammonia, as well as 30ppm nitrates, so i doubt it's the water. Did they look sick? Any spots, streaks, ulcers, erratic behaviour, etc? How did you acclimate them? Or perhaps you just have a bad batch/they were at their limits already before you got them..
I let them sit in the bag in the tank for 15 minutes. They had red areas when they died.
 

vyrille

Well Known Member
Messages
549
Reaction score
265
Points
73
Experience
5 to 10 years
I let them sit in the bag in the tank for 15 minutes. They had red areas when they died.
Could you describe these red areas a little more? Do you have pictures? Were their gills red, as well as parts of the fins?
 

Kiks

Well Known Member
Messages
1,194
Reaction score
509
Points
148
Experience
5 to 10 years
I let them sit in the bag in the tank for 15 minutes. They had red areas when they died.
Did you add any water from the tank to the bag? Or did you only acclimate them to the temperature change?
15 minutes is a quite quick acclimation no matter how it's done.
 

FinalFins

Well Known Member
Messages
1,445
Reaction score
705
Points
123
Agree. If you just added them with only temo acclimation that could possible be quite a shock, a shock enough to kill.
 

kallililly1973

Fishlore VIP
Messages
5,905
Reaction score
4,164
Points
423
Experience
3 years
Also have you tested your source water? It’s always good practice to do that to know exactly what your adding to the tank
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #11

Fuz

New Member
Messages
39
Reaction score
14
Points
8
Experience
Just started
Could you describe these red areas a little more? Do you have pictures? Were their gills red, as well as parts of the fins?
Near their gills and I think near their eye. It looked like possibly from fighting or running into something

Agree. If you just added them with only temo acclimation that could possible be quite a shock, a shock enough to kill.
What's the best way to acclimate them.

Did you add any water from the tank to the bag? Or did you only acclimate them to the temperature change?
15 minutes is a quite quick acclimation no matter how it's done.
No water from the bag, I thought that was a bad idea.

Also have you tested your source water? It’s always good practice to do that to know exactly what your adding to the tank
Yes I did test it. I also did the research.
 

FinalFins

Well Known Member
Messages
1,445
Reaction score
705
Points
123
The best way is to drip acclimate but you can also do this,

float the bag open, roll down the sides.

add some tank water every 10 minutes and when the bag is full, empty 50% of it and repeat.

Then after the second round release them by dumping the water over a net over a bucket.
 

vyrille

Well Known Member
Messages
549
Reaction score
265
Points
73
Experience
5 to 10 years
Red gills can mean ammonia burn, and if all of them had it, it's very unlikely all of them got the same injuries fighting/running into objects. but without pictures, it's hard to tell.

The best way to acclimate is by drip acclimation, but slowly adding tank water into the fish bag every 5-10mins is also good for less sensitive fish.
No water from the bag, I thought that was a bad idea.
Generally, it's a bad idea to let fish bag water into your tank, that's why you do the opposite when acclimatising, you put tank water into the bag instead. Finalfins covered it pretty much. this should be done over 45mins-1hr. When you're done, net the fish and release, then discard the bag water.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #14

Fuz

New Member
Messages
39
Reaction score
14
Points
8
Experience
Just started
I should add that one danio was picking on the other two. And the last one was doing well until overnight when he passed.
 

FinalFins

Well Known Member
Messages
1,445
Reaction score
705
Points
123
Well in small numbers danios will fin nip aggressively. In bigger numbers and a bigger space (55g, 20 danios) the nipping should cease.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #16

Fuz

New Member
Messages
39
Reaction score
14
Points
8
Experience
Just started
Red gills can mean ammonia burn, and if all of them had it, it's very unlikely all of them got the same injuries fighting/running into objects. but without pictures, it's hard to tell.

The best way to acclimate is by drip acclimation, but slowly adding tank water into the fish bag every 5-10mins is also good for less sensitive fish.

Generally, it's a bad idea to let fish bag water into your tank, that's why you do the opposite when acclimatising, you put tank water into the bag instead. Finalfins covered it pretty much. this should be done over 45mins-1hr. When you're done, net the fish and release, then discard the bag water.
The drip method, can this be done in a short distance? Say less than two feet? I have a cat and want to keep the fish safe. Another option could I get one of the drip and go and have a 18 inch line from the tank to the drip and go?

Well in small numbers danios will fin nip aggressively. In bigger numbers and a bigger space (55g, 20 danios) the nipping should cease.
I am planning on setting this up for a tetra community tank. 20G
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #18

Fuz

New Member
Messages
39
Reaction score
14
Points
8
Experience
Just started
Red gills can mean ammonia burn, and if all of them had it, it's very unlikely all of them got the same injuries fighting/running into objects. but without pictures, it's hard to tell.

The best way to acclimate is by drip acclimation, but slowly adding tank water into the fish bag every 5-10mins is also good for less sensitive fish.

Generally, it's a bad idea to let fish bag water into your tank, that's why you do the opposite when acclimatising, you put tank water into the bag instead. Finalfins covered it pretty much. this should be done over 45mins-1hr. When you're done, net the fish and release, then discard the bag water.
Doing some research, I came across this video

I know. Im explaining what a scenario for small amounts of fin nipping are.
My lfs told me danio are hardy so they can help establish a tank and suggested only three.
 
Toggle Sidebar

Aquarium Calculator

Follow FishLore!





Top Bottom