What are the consequences of adding too many fish at once?

CorydorasCats

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Genuine question that I want to learn about!

What actually are the consequences of adding too many fish at once?

I know that it could cause ammonia / nitrite spikes due to increased bioload but if that was monitored very closely and daily water changes done whilst it evened-out that could be controlled?

What else is there to consider? Could it stress the fish out or would that not really make much of a difference given they would all have been added at the same time?

Thanks in advance for any opinions on this! :)
 

TheDojoMojo

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I haven't run an experiment myself to know for sure, but I think ammonia and nitrite spikes are the only real big one I've heard of. I guess if you already have fish in the tank, adding a ton of new neighbors all at once would stress them out. If the fish currently in there are prone to being aggressive, then this would also increase theyre aggression towards the new fish if they are all added suddenly. I dont think it would stress the new fish at all as far as the social aspects go (as long as the stocking isnt overcrowded in the first place, and it may even be best as all the fish would be able to claim their territory at the same time, but obviously amm/nitrite would. I suppose if you dosed ammonia for long enough and in high enough concentration you could eliminate the threat of ammo/nitrite spike, but its still best not to shock your tanks ecosystem with too many fish at once in my opinion.
 

GlennO

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Disrupting the cycle is the main concern. On the other hand adding only one or a few fish at a time is risky unless you have a QT tank, since each new addition risks introducing disease.
 
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CorydorasCats

CorydorasCats

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Drasi said:
Sounds awfully risky. You might not catch the spikes when they happen.
I’m not saying I would do this I’m just interested in finding out why people don’t do it..

It seems like such a big no no in the aquarium hobby but I don’t actually understand why (other then bioload issues)

Obviously the last thing anyone would want to do is go and spend £100s on a bunch of new fish for them to potentially suffer and die but is this really a risk?

I just think this is an interesting topic.. more opinions would be appreciated!
 

paulinajgu

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Why dont you read my thread and see what happens... no spike yet fish and slowly dying. It is so awful! I dont know what to do.
 

aquachris

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CorydorasCats said:
I’m not saying I would do this I’m just interested in finding out why people don’t do it..
Ahh okay :)

CorydorasCats said:
Obviously the last thing anyone would want to do is go and spend £100s on a bunch of new fish for them to potentially suffer and die but is this really a risk?
Yes, its a serious risk. I have learned this the hard way, and my fish suffered because of it (not to mention wasted money). I vowed to learn as much as I could to be a better fish dad since then (don't know even a partial of it all, but that's why these places like this are awesome)!

Glad your asking questions and researching - Definitely how we get better :) hope we all can learn together!
 
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CorydorasCats

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Drasi said:
Ahh okay :)


Yes, its a serious risk. I have learned this the hard way, and my fish suffered because of it (not to mention wasted money). I vowed to learn as much as I could to be a better fish dad since then (don't know even a partial of it all, but that's why these places like this are awesome)!

Glad your asking questions and researching - Definitely how we get better :) hope we all can learn together!
I am new to fishkeeping and like probably 99% of people when they first start out have learnt things the hard way from bad LFS advice! I lost half my fish to nitrite poisoning when I first got my tank :(

I am now much more knowledgeable than I was but still learn something new every day and by no means an expert! Far from it!

There is obviously a reason this is not regularly done which is kind of an answer in itself but I’m still interested in opinions and if anyone has done this before :)
 

aquachris

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CorydorasCats said:
I am new to fishkeeping and like probably 99% of people when they first start out have learnt things the hard way from bad LFS advice! I lost half my fish to nitrite poisoning when I first got my tank :(
What I have found is never trust LFS people! Man all the things I've heard spew from their mouths. There's like 1 store I trust, and its only certain people there now, otherwise, I will do the research on my own!
 

TheDojoMojo

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CorydorasCats said:
I am new to fishkeeping and like probably 99% of people when they first start out have learnt things the hard way from bad LFS advice! I lost half my fish to nitrite poisoning when I first got my tank :(

I am now much more knowledgeable than I was but still learn something new every day and by no means an expert! Far from it!

There is obviously a reason this is not regularly done which is kind of an answer in itself but I’m still interested in opinions and if anyone has done this before :)
Yep. As you get more knowledgeable and get to know your lfs better you can then decide which employees actually know a thing or two about the hobby. My lfs has like half clueless and half seem to be very good. I've learned to only trust the ones I've payed attention to and seem to agree with for the most part.

I'm relatively experienced in the hobby myself but still learn at least one thing every time I spend the time on it. There is a practically endless supply of things to learn. Even after you think you know everything, a thought hits you and you need to test it out for yourself. Prob the two biggest things I recommend for a beginner who seeks knowledge are, 1: Get into plants sooner. Its one thing I wish I had done a lot sooner, because once I did it, it transformed my whole hobby. 2: Get involved in a solid, educational, well respected fish-keeping youtube channel (or more than one). It may seem weird especially if you aren't about that youtube life, but for me personally it was the best way for me to go from a beginner to a rather knowledgeable fishkeeper. I would put on videos or live streams in the background while I work or hang out or anything. I was able to absorb a wide variety of information from an experienced individual. While I still had to learn a ton outside of that, it was an excellent foundation! :)
 
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CorydorasCats

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TheDojoMojo said:
Yep. As you get more knowledgeable and get to know your lfs better you can then decide which employees actually know a thing or two about the hobby. My lfs has like half clueless and half seem to be very good. I've learned to only trust the ones I've payed attention to and seem to agree with for the most part.

I'm relatively experienced in the hobby myself but still learn at least one thing every time I spend the time on it. There is a practically endless supply of things to learn. Even after you think you know everything, a thought hits you and you need to test it out for yourself. Prob the two biggest things I recommend for a beginner who seeks knowledge are, 1: Get into plants sooner. Its one thing I wish I had done a lot sooner, because once I did it, it transformed my whole hobby. 2: Get involved in a solid, educational, well respected fish-keeping youtube channel (or more than one). It may seem weird especially if you aren't about that youtube life, but for me personally it was the best way for me to go from a beginner to a rather knowledgeable fishkeeper. I would put on videos or live streams in the background while I work or hang out or anything. I was able to absorb a wide variety of information from an experienced individual. While I still had to learn a ton outside of that, it was an excellent foundation! :)
Completely agree with you on that! I swear I spend every waking moment either googling something fish related, browsing this forum, watching YouTube channels (currently on aquarium co op and kg tropicals) can you recommend any good ones?

I certainly didn’t realise the amount of work fish keeping is (naive I know) but I’m finding that is half the fun of the hobby :)
 

aquachris

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I watch quite a variety I have found that come up with suggestions from those same ones :) Michael's Fish Room, Multi-Tank Addiction, Ben Ochart, Prime Time Aquatics, Ha Y N Fish Keeper, Palmer Aquatics, Tazawa Tanks, King of DIY, inventory king... I have more, but these are the ones from looking at my subscription lol. Always adding more too.
 
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CorydorasCats

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Drasi said:
I watch quite a variety I have found that come up with suggestions from those same ones :) Michael's Fish Room, Multi-Tank Addiction, Ben Ochart, Prime Time Aquatics, Ha Y N Fish Keeper, Palmer Aquatics, Tazawa Tanks, King of DIY, inventory king... I have more, but these are the ones from looking at my subscription lol. Always adding more too.
Thanks for the suggestions I’ll have a look! :D
 

Islandvic

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Drasi has some great channels listed. Prime Time Aquatics is one of my favorites regarding our hobby.

CorydorasCats , I added around 15 juvenile Mbuna to our 55g all at once. The tank had water in it for the first time the same day the fish arrived from FedEx.

I pulled a canister from a 75g community tank though and put it on the new 55g, so it was instantly cycled. I did some extra WC's the first couple of weeks, just to reduce the stress on the new fish.
 
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CorydorasCats

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It seems that if you are able and willing to check your water multiple times a day and water change as necessary then you could potentially add many fish at once.. o_O ?

Definitely not ideal or recommended but from the sounds of responses it is possible as long as you are able to monitor the water parameters meticulously?

Interesting topic :pigeon:
 

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