What Am I Doing Wrong?

Photobelle

Member
I have a freshwater 20 long .It is cycled with 2 filtera running. I have 2 air stones, Anubis, sand and other decorations. I have lost quite a few fish in this whole process. We start one yr ago and upgraded to the 20 over the summer. I just lost another guppy. I do weekly water changed of 25-50% (some weeks smaller, other weeks larger). When I tstd the water Tues durodua changed it was 7.8 pH, 0 ammonia, 0 nitrites, 40 nitrates. I recently noticed the nitrates are high than they used to be even though I didn't change anything I was doing. What would cause this and is it harming the fish? Is there anything else I am not doing? I do have the same 6 glofish danios from when we switched to a 20 and a platy that was the only baby who survived. I'm not sure why they are fine and yet I keep losing other fish. (Platies, cories and guppies to be exact). Thank you.
 

AquaticJ

Member
Your fish grow and that means they’ll produce more waste, that’s all. I would try larger more frequent water changes.
 

Gone

Member
Your test readings aren't bad. 40 ppm million is a bit high for nitrates, but shouldn't be high enough to cause any serious problems. However, if you're doing 25% to 50% water changes once a week, and your nitrates are at that level, something is causing nitrates to accumulate. There are lots of possible causes, the most common being feeding. The amount of ammonia or nitrates in a tank are not the result of how many fish you have, it's the result of how much food you're putting in. If it's the food, you can continue to feed like you are and do higher water change percentages, or try backing off on feeding. Other possible problems are plants dying off, or nitrates in your tap water.

Not sure why you're losing some fish. The water parameters don't indicate a problem.
 

AquaticJ

Member
GuppyDazzle said:
Your test readings aren't bad. 40 ppm million is a bit high for nitrates, but shouldn't be high enough to cause any serious problems. However, if you're doing 25% to 50% water changes once a week, and your nitrates are at that level, something is causing nitrates to accumulate. There are lots of possible causes, the most common being feeding. The amount of ammonia or nitrates in a tank are not the result of how many fish you have, it's the result of how much food you're putting in. If it's the food, you can continue to feed like you are and do higher water change percentages, or try backing off on feeding. Other possible problems are plants dying off, or nitrates in your tap water.

Not sure why you're losing some fish. The water parameters don't indicate a problem.
Its the result of fish pooping, not from just how much fish food you’re adding. Fish eat algae and other microorganisms as well, produce poop, which is broken down into ammonia, then to nitrites, then finally nitrates.
 

King o´ Angelfish

Member
Check if your tap water has nitrates in it. Those water changes should not allow that much ppm of nitrates unless you are feeding too much/are overstocked/or your tap water already has nitrates.
 
  • Thread Starter

Photobelle

Member
I may be a little overstocked but not much and that is why I run 2 filters. 6 glofish danios, 4 male guppies and 2 platies (just got 3 of the guppies and 1 platy last week and the nitrates were at this level before I added them). I got the 2nd platy to keep the baby who has grown company as all the others died off. I also have one amano shrimp and 2 snails. The Anubis look healthy. Maybe I am feeding them to much but I got paranoid because so many died I was like maybe I didn't feed them enough. I do 2 pinches twice a day. Maybe I'll do one pinch twice a day and see what happens. I can also start trying to do bigger water changes. I'll check my tap again but I know last time I did it didn't have nitrates.
 

King o´ Angelfish

Member
Photobelle said:
I may be a little overstocked but not much and that is why I run 2 filters. 6 glofish danios, 4 male guppies and 2 platies (just got 3 of the guppies and 1 platy last week and the nitrates were at this level before I added them). I got the 2nd platy to keep the baby who has grown company as all the others died off. I also have one amano shrimp and 2 snails. The Anubis look healthy. Maybe I am feeding them to much but I got paranoid because so many died I was like maybe I didn't feed them enough. I do 2 pinches twice a day. Maybe I'll do one pinch twice a day and see what happens. I can also start trying to do bigger water changes. I'll check my tap again but I know last time I did it didn't have nitrates.
As for your your stock you are currently not overstocked. So we can rule out that.

As for your feeding I would definitly cut back to 1 pinch twice a day. Just make sure they eat all that you feed them in less that 3-5 min.

Dont do bigger water changes at once. Do smaller but more frequent water changes. For example, 2 or 3 50% water changes per week. Its safer to spit them up than to do ONE BIG water change.

Only thing in doubt now would be your tap water. Once we get the test results we can know for sure what is causing your high nitrates.
 

Gone

Member
AquaticJ said:
Its the result of fish pooping, not from just how much fish food you’re adding. Fish eat algae and other microorganisms as well, produce poop, which is broken down into ammonia, then to nitrites, then finally nitrates.
Yes, fish also eat algae and microorganisms, but algae and microorganisms are not going to cause high levels of nitrates when there are 25% to 50% water changes weekly. There's something else causing the nitrate levels.
 

Islandvic

Member
This fish you were losing could have just been bad strains from the breeder that were sent to the LFS, or could have been stressed/unhealthy to begin with before you bought them.

I also keep a 20 gallon with 2 filters. My stocking is slightly more than yours.

Here is a link to a thread on the forum for DIY Filter Media. It gives ideas for inexpensive and effective ways to boost your filter's mechanical and biological filtration. I did the write-up and are methods I have used that worked for me.

The filters in the examples may be different than yours, but the ideas are easily adaptable to any brand of filter.
 

Pat93

Member
I know everyone already answered you but I’m bored and the point of a forum is to get multiple opinions on something so here goes.
Corydoras also need a dedicated feeding of some sort of sinking shrimp disc or pellet. They can live on flakes but they are voracious eaters and so feed them enough to where they still work the tank over cleaning it. If they just sit on the bottom lazily in a pile all day you have fed them to much. A lot of fish can go three days or so without eating. They will eat like they are starving even if they are full every time you sprinkle in anything. When you have a community tank it’s important to not over feed but still feed a variety of things so everyone gets what they need. Good luck!
 

Most photos, videos and links are disabled if you are not logged in.

Log in or register to view

Top Bottom