What’s Wrong With His Fins? Question

Discussion in 'Freshwater Fish Disease' started by Jacob MacDonald, Apr 17, 2018.

  1. Jacob MacDonald

    Jacob MacDonaldValued MemberMember

    Hi,

    So I’ve noticed the my Male GBR (wild caught) has some damage on his fins. There are little rips and tears on the edges of most of his fins. He eats normal and seems to behave normal. He chases my female (she was just introduced about 2-3 weeks ago) all the time and it seems pretty bad I was more worried for her but I know it’s mating behaviour, she has actually laid eggs in my tank but they were unsuccessful at raising them and she seems to cope fine with his chasing. I’m really confused as I would expect her to have damaged fins but her’s are fine, his aren’t. I really don’t know where it’s coming from and what to do.

    View attachment 430358View attachment 430359View attachment 430360View attachment 430361

    (The area circled in red was like that when I got him so I’m not worried about that but everywhere else and circled in green is what I’m concerned about)

    Thanks for any help.

    Let me know if you can’t see the pictures. Not sure if they worked
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2018
  2. LilBlub

    LilBlubWell Known MemberMember

    I just took a look at the links and they all came up with an “error”. You could try uploading them directly to the page, if the links aren’t working.

    My best guess with just the info is he could’ve ripped them on something, or perhaps another fish is nipping them. Is it just those two in the tank, or do you have other fish? I’ve never heard of female fish biting the male’s fins, but I guess it could happen.
     
  3. OP
    OP
    Jacob MacDonald

    Jacob MacDonaldValued MemberMember

    IMG_0216.JPGIMG_0219.jpgIMG_0220.JPGIMG_0221.jpg

    (Hopefully those work now)

    Actually I just noticed this morning the female bit his fins so I’m guessing that’s where it’s coming from. They are the rulers of the tank, just them some Dwarf Pencilfish and some Kuhlis.

    Today he looks far worse. They are constantly going after each other to the point where the female looks stressed as he vigorously swims after her although she does get him some times. Is their chasing a problem? Will it stop? Will his fins grow back?
     




  4. LilBlub

    LilBlubWell Known MemberMember

    I’m not a GBR expert, but his fins will definitely grow back as long as the fin rays aren’t damaged (which, based on the pictures, look totally fine). I also looked into it and read that it could be helpful to introduce another female, so the one isn’t constantly being picked on, stressed out, and resort to biting. So if you have a big enough tank, I’d try that and see if it works.
     
  5. OP
    OP
    Jacob MacDonald

    Jacob MacDonaldValued MemberMember

    It’s a 26 gallon bowfront and my nitrates are always under 5 so I believe that I should be fine to get another one although it’s not my preference, will it affect their spawning as they did once before the female got sick but since she’s recovered that’s when the fins and aggression have become a problem. Also I do plan on getting a Dwarf Gourami eventually (not any time soon) maybe some more Pencilfish too as I fell I’d like more than just 6. Would getting another female affect any of these things? Is there another alternative? Is it possible that they might stop? Why are they even doing this?

    I tried to get a picture of what he looks like now but he wouldn’t stay still.
     
  6. LilBlub

    LilBlubWell Known MemberMember

    Relentlessly chasing the female seems like aggression to me, not just normal spawning behavior. There is something you can do about Aggressive fish: temporarily remove them from the tank and put them in a different one. Wait a few days, then reintroduce them. This will sort of “reset” his views of the tank, and has been known to reduce bad behaviors. Other than that, I don’t really know what else you can do. I’d think that since all the fish you talked about are pretty small and have a light bioload, they should be okay together with another GBR if you decide to try that.
     
  7. OP
    OP
    Jacob MacDonald

    Jacob MacDonaldValued MemberMember

    Yeah definitely aggression. I don’t have any other tanks. But I do own a little breeder box that floats at the top of the tank I could put him in the to isolate him from everyone else but it would be very uncomfortable for him and it’s still in the tank so I don’t know if it would do much. What if I introduced a Dwarf Gourami right now? Could that spread out the aggression or would it cause more problems?
     
  8. LilBlub

    LilBlubWell Known MemberMember

    Most likely it would cause more problems. DGs are fin-nippers, so if the GBR starts being aggressive towards it the bites in his fins are going to get even worse. Which can open a door for infections or fin rot. I’d just recommend introcuding another female, as that seems to be the most effective. If he seems less aggressive after that, you can try introducing some new fish.
     
  9. OP
    OP
    Jacob MacDonald

    Jacob MacDonaldValued MemberMember

    Yeah that’s what I was thinking but just wanted to make to evaluate all possible solutions. Having another female won’t bother the other female and my future stocking plan? I’ll get in contact with my lfs hopefully they still have some.
     
  10. LilBlub

    LilBlubWell Known MemberMember

    Some GBR actually prefer to be kept in a harem as opposed to a pair, according to what I’ve read. I’ve never kept them, but that’s what came up when I researched it, so hopefully it will work. You’ll either have to risk adding a new female or invest in another tank to separate the male.
     
  11. OP
    OP
    Jacob MacDonald

    Jacob MacDonaldValued MemberMember

    Okay then my option seems pretty clear. Thanks very much for your help and time
     
  12. LilBlub

    LilBlubWell Known MemberMember

    You’re welcome, I really hope your guys settle down and stop stressing each other out.
     




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