Ways To Speed Up Water Changes

remy113
  • #1
So I’ve been trying to figure out a way to make my water changes quicker. I have a 30 gallon tank that isn’t super close to a sink. Right now I’m currently running buckets. I picked up a cheap gravel vac from Walmart. It works well. I vac into a 5 gallon bucket in the ground then dump the bucket in the toilet. I do roughly a 30% change weekly(so ten gallons). Then I refill with said 5 gallon after cleaning things like scraping build up off. So I’m wondering if there could be an easier cheaper way. Any ideas

30g
Penguin 200
A 5 1/2 inch by 4 1/2 sponge filter
Air stone
78 f*
1 plant of java moss my first attempt at a planted tank
2 plecos. They will be rehomed in time when the place can take them
3 platys
3 mystery snails

IMG_1471.JPG
 
Bryangar
  • #2
Invest in a python. They have them in sizes up to 75 feet long. There’s also a an aqueon version of it.
 
Fashooga
  • #3
It depends on how much you want to spend to make it more efficient.

I use a pond pump to take all the water out and use a python system to refill the tank.
 
Rtessy
  • #4
Get an $8 water pump off of Amazon to bring water from the bucket up into the tank instead of lifting and dumping
 
Mom2some
  • #5
You can also YouTube ways to make your own python system for much less than you can buy it - if you are crafty/handy. I change 50% of my 34 gallon tank & refill in under 30 minutes with my Python.
 
83jase
  • #6
Use the outlet of your canister filter to a hose or buy a large power head and hose to suit I use 1400lph pump and 19mm hose gets it done quick plus water isn't wasted goes to garden and or lawns and then quick sweep of gravel vac into bucket which also I recycle
 
remy113
  • Thread Starter
  • #7
I don’t have a canister filter just a HOB and sponge filter
 
83jase
  • #8
My bad was viewing on my phone now inside can see clearly is a hob. Quickest way still is large power head hose to suit or if you want to go next level pond pump
 
Pescado_Verde
  • #9
Agree on the pump. I just bought 3 SunSun's from Amazon because they were dirt cheap, $12 ea. claim they will pump 300 gals per hour. I can see running some hose (figure out what will fit and make it long enough to go outside or to the tub or wherever), drop the pump in the tank and plug it in. Probably would want to keep an eye on the livestock while that's running.
 
bzambo66
  • #10
In terms of adding water, can you add water straight from the tap and condition it in the tank, or should I fill up a 5 gallon bucket, condition that and then add the bucket?

The only issue with the latter is if I'm water changing 15 gallons that's 3 buckets and that's annoying to do.

Any suggestions...
 
83jase
  • #11
I got 30ltr buckets I mix prime in and temp match yes it's pain in the bum but you get over it I believe this is the best way to do it it's all mixed and temp matched for minimal stress
 
bzambo66
  • #12
I got 30ltr buckets I mix prime in and temp match yes it's pain in the bum but you get over it I believe this is the best way to do it it's all mixed and temp matched for minimal stress
So how do you dump a giant 30 liter bucket into your tank? Couldn't you use maybe a water pump and pump the water in that way?
 
remy113
  • Thread Starter
  • #13
So how do you dump a giant 30 liter bucket into your tank? Couldn't you use maybe a water pump and pump the water in that way?

I use a 5 gallon bucket that I lift and slowly pour in
 
Galathiel
  • #14
I put my Prime directly in the tank and then fill it from the sink. I can't lift heavy buckets (bad shoulders/elbow) and certainly don't refill it with my 1 gallon jug which is what I use for my smaller tanks!
 
mossman
  • #15
Curious how you guy dechlorinate when using the Python. Do you dose the tank first then add the new water? I imagine this subjects the fish to chlorine if even for a few minutes until everything mixes.
 
max h
  • #16
When using a python type system you just dose for the whole capacity of the tank for the partial water change. I normally add prime right after I turn the sink on for the refill after vacuuming.
 
Fashooga
  • #17
Curious how you guy dechlorinate when using the Python. Do you dose the tank first then add the new water? I imagine this subjects the fish to chlorine if even for a few minutes until everything mixes.
I shoot some Stress Coat or Prime into the tank and let er pour.
 
mossman
  • #18
I see. What about all that water that is sitting inside the 50' of hose once you are done refilling? Just put your thumb over the end, walk it over to the sink, and drain it?

And what if you want to give your sponge filter a rinse in used water? Do you just rinse it inside the tank prior to draining it?
 
max h
  • #19
I see. What about all that water that is sitting inside the 50' of hose once you are done refilling? Just put your thumb over the end, walk it over to the sink, and drain it?

And what if you want to give your sponge filter a rinse in used water? Do you just rinse it inside the tank prior to draining it?

As far as the sponge filter goes, just use the regular syphon to get some water from the tank into a bucket and rinse the sponge.
 
Inactive User
  • #20
I'll put in a vote of support for a pond pump. Mine is adjustable between 200-1000 L/hour (50-250 gal./hour), and I connected it with a piece of hose to a nearby bathroom: weekly 50% water changes on a 47 gallon are a breeze.

Water conditioner goes straight into the tank prior to filling with new water, and I take the filter media out and rinse it under the old tank water as it comes out the hose while draining the tank (I don't rinse it in the tank itself).
 
bzambo66
  • #21
I'll put in a vote of support for a pond pump. Mine is adjustable between 200-1000 L/hour (50-250 gal./hour), and I connected it with a piece of hose to a nearby bathroom: weekly 50% water changes on a 47 gallon are a breeze.

Water conditioner goes straight into the tank prior to filling with new water, and I take the filter media out and rinse it under the old tank water as it comes out the hose while draining the tank (I don't rinse it in the tank itself).

Where does the pump go? Doesn't the pump have to be in the water you are pumping into the tank?

Also, do you get nervous adding tap water into your tank directly? I know you say you condition the tank beforehand but just wondering.
 
max h
  • #22
Where does the pump go? Doesn't the pump have to be in the water you are pumping into the tank?

Also, do you get nervous adding tap water into your tank directly? I know you say you condition the tank beforehand but just wondering.

It depends on the pump you buy, some are only submersible. Others can be used as submersible or dry.
 
Inactive User
  • #23
Where does the pump go? Doesn't the pump have to be in the water you are pumping into the tank?

Mine's a submersible pump so it goes into the tank when draining and into the sink when filling the tank. I should've clarified that the hose I mentioned is the outlet hose (not the inlet).

Also, do you get nervous adding tap water into your tank directly? I know you say you condition the tank beforehand but just wondering.

Not especially. My tap water has fairly stable parameters (major metropolitan water authority), and I only just adjust it for temperature.
 
bzambo66
  • #24
Mine's a submersible pump so it goes into the tank when draining and into the sink when filling the tank. I should've clarified that the hose I mentioned is the outlet hose (not the inlet).

Ok so when it's in your sink you just keep the sink water flowing while the pump keeps pumping it into your tank is that correct? Do you worry about the sink having germs in it from people washing hands and such? I know I sound like a germaphobe here but just curious how you go about doing it.
 
Inactive User
  • #25
Do you worry about the sink having germs in it from people washing hands and such?

That's a good question. It's a bathroom which is connected to my study, and while I'm the only one who uses it, I use it to frequently wash my hands (removing/inserting contact lenses).

I was mostly concerned about transferring soap/antibacterial residue from the sides of the sink into the aquarium, so I just position the pump inside a small, clean bowl under the faucet.

In addition, I drain the old tank water into the toilet bowl. I wasn't comfortable about the idea of the tank water draining into the sink/bathtub/shower floor.

Ok so when it's in your sink you just keep the sink water flowing while the pump keeps pumping it into your tank is that correct?

That's correct.

Some people might not want to fuss with an electrical cord, but to me, it was the most accessible solution.

Ideally, I'd only use the pump to drain the water, and I'd hook up a hose straight to the faucet to fill the tank. However, the bathroom faucet has a non-standard thread for the aerator and I couldn't find an appropriate universal tap adapter to accomodate the use of a hose.
 
bzambo66
  • #26
That's a good question. It's a bathroom which is connected to my study, and while I'm the only one who uses it, I use it to frequently wash my hands (removing/inserting contact lenses).

I was mostly concerned about transferring soap/antibacterial residue from the sides of the sink into the aquarium, so I just position the pump inside a small, clean bowl under the faucet.

In addition, I drain the old tank water into the toilet bowl. I wasn't comfortable about the idea of the tank water draining into the sink/bathtub/shower floor.



That's correct.

Some people might not want to fuss with an electrical cord, but to me, it was the most accessible solution.

Ideally, I'd only use the pump to drain the water, and I'd hook up a hose straight to the faucet to fill the tank. However, the bathroom faucet has a non-standard thread for the aerator and I couldn't find an appropriate universal tap adapter to accomodate the use of a hose.

Makes sense! Interesting. Thanks for your input.
 

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