55 Gallon Tank Water Wisteria- there can only be one?

Madchild57

I have this massive floating water wisteria, it is about 1 foot (30.5 cm) in diameter with roots hanging about 6-7 inches down from the surface, it is a total unit. I used to have a bunch of smaller water wisterias, they all came from the same original plant that melted and formed new plants off of the melting leaves.
About 2-3 weeks ago, the smaller wisterias started dying off en masse, with roots shriveling up, leaves getting holes, and just general withering away. My large water wisteria was totally unaffected by this dying off. It wasn't caused by a nutrient deficiency as none of my other plants (which are rooted) experienced any issues. What is happening here?
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here is the large plant, it definitely has a preference to grow on one side but you can see the older leaves are duller and have some holes (keep in mind this is a 55 gallon). It is also growing extremely fast as most floaters do.
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and on these older leaves, there are new plantlets growing off of them, unlike the smaller plants that died off suddenly.
 

ProudPapa

I can't answer your question, but I'm 98% sure that's water sprite, not water wisteria.
 

BradleyH2O

Wondering if the larger plant is hogging up all the nutrients
 

Madchild57

Wondering if the larger plant is hogging up all the nutrients
I would think so if my other plants were affected but they weren't.
I can't answer your question, but I'm 98% sure that's water sprite, not water wisteria.
There isn't much difference between water wisteria and broad leaf sprite, I honestly can't tell the difference, but I've only ever seen narrow leaf sprite sold, so I assumed it was mislabelled as they often are.
 

ProudPapa

There isn't much difference between water wisteria and broad leaf sprite, I honestly can't tell the difference, but I've only ever seen narrow leaf sprite sold, so I assumed it was mislabelled as they often are.

Although the leaves have similar shapes, there are distinct differences if you know what to look for.
  • Water wisteria is a stem plant, with leaves coming off the stem at nodes. If you cut the stem it will start a new one, or sometimes two, at the node below the cut, and keep growing.
  • All water wisteria's stems sprout from a single location just above the roots. The leaves will branch as it gets larger. It produces new plants from the leaves, similar to Java fern.
 

Hellfishguy

Definitely water sprite. I can see a young plant growing from a frond of the larger plant In the photo.
 

SeattleRoy

I have this massive floating water wisteria, it is about 1 foot (30.5 cm) in diameter with roots hanging about 6-7 inches down from the surface, it is a total unit. I used to have a bunch of smaller water wisterias, they all came from the same original plant that melted and formed new plants off of the melting leaves.
About 2-3 weeks ago, the smaller wisterias started dying off en masse, with roots shriveling up, leaves getting holes, and just general withering away. My large water wisteria was totally unaffected by this dying off. It wasn't caused by a nutrient deficiency as none of my other plants (which are rooted) experienced any issues. What is happening here?
You must be registered to see images
here is the large plant, it definitely has a preference to grow on one side but you can see the older leaves are duller and have some holes (keep in mind this is a 55 gallon). It is also growing extremely fast as most floaters do.
You must be registered to see images
and on these older leaves, there are new plantlets growing off of them, unlike the smaller plants that died off suddenly.
Hi Madchild57

The plants in your pictures is Ceratopteris cornuta (aka Broadleaf Watersprite). I'm guessing one side of the plant is under the light and the other side in a more shaded area.

Watersprite and Water Wisteria have similar looking leaves however the plants are totally different. Watersprite is a 'crown' plant where all the leaves emerge one portion of the plant, the crown which it typically planted at the substrate level. Water Wisteria (Hygrophila difformis) on the other hand is a stem plant where the leaves emerged from a stem or stalk as the stem grows. -Roy
 

Madchild57

Hi Madchild57

The plants in your pictures is Ceratopteris cornuta (aka Broadleaf Watersprite). I'm guessing one side of the plant is under the light and the other side in a more shaded area.

Watersprite and Water Wisteria have similar looking leaves however the plants are totally different. Watersprite is a 'crown' plant where all the leaves emerge one portion of the plant, the crown which it typically planted at the substrate level. Water Wisteria (Hygrophila difformis) on the other hand is a stem plant where the leaves emerged from a stem or stalk as the stem grows. -Roy
Yeah definitely sprite haha do you have any ides why my smaller plants died? They're floating so each side is getting mostly equal light.
 

SeattleRoy

Yeah definitely sprite haha do you have any ides why my smaller plants died? They're floating so each side is getting mostly equal light.
Hi Madchild57

Possibly a lack of nutrients. If there isn't sufficient available it is easier for the plant to keep the existing leaves than try to grow new ones. Ceratopteris cornuta is an easy plant to grow - it just needs light and nutrients. -Roy
 

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