water specs and nitrifying bacteria

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inari

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I have a 10 gallon tank with a Betta, 5 goffy cories, 1 bamboo shrimp, 1 ghost shrimp, one bristlenose pleco, 1 oto, and a planted tank, I'm concerned that most every freaking time i test my water the only fluxuation that I get is my pH my ammonias are always at 0 nitrates 0 (even after I fertilize my tank), and nitrites also 0 (even after fertilazation) Now my concern is that my nitrifying bacteria is dead (or dyeing) from lack of food, my reasoning behind this is that my shrimp eat bacteria and shrimp pellets, and i noticed my bamboo shrimp was starting to red yet again, so i was wondering if and/or how i should counter act this .... so confused

~inari
 
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inari

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Ok the real issue that I'm concerned with is that yesterday and today I tested my water and my pH was all the way up to an 8.4 AND I CHANGED THE *************** water yesterday and added some pH down today. Any and all advise is more than welcome.

~Inari
 

Timesdragonfly

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I've always heard that using chemicals to alter the pH of the water can do more harm than good. The problem is that the pH becomes unstable because of the chemicals, and the sudden changes in pH are what kills the fish. Understanding why you pH is so high, will be more important than trying to alter the it with chemicals. ~J~
 
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inari

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Yes I know this I've taken a ton of chemistry. I'm wondering if my Nitrogen are dyeing out because they are competing with my plants (ammonia, Nitrates, ect.) That is my concern. I'm doing daily water changes to keep my pH down. can anyone help (besides telling me not to add more chemicals into my tank not to be rude, it was good advice, but i need to know what is going on)

~inari
 

Timesdragonfly

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Do you have any rocks in your tank? Certain rocks can cause the pH to shift.
Do you vacume your gravel with every water change? (this can reduce the amount of good bacteria in your tank)
 
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inari

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Yes i do have a 'lava rock' and i know that this will alter my pH. However, this has been a problem since day 1. My pH always goes up as it approaches time for a water change, but it is the fact that my water was up to a 8.4 in less than 24 hrs is what concerns me. I have to vacuum out my gravel because of a higher bio load and food that doesn't get eaten at the end of the week. So, yes I do vac it once a week. Other than the 'lava' rock I have normal gravel and some florite (i think that is what it's called, looks very red and is supposed to be awesome for plants...) but other than that i don't know.

thanx

~Inari
 

0morrokh

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Are you using test strips or liquid tests? Also, have you tested the pH of your tap water? Let it sit out overnight and then test it. That's really weird that your pH went up so quickly, idk why that would happen.
Also I'm confused as to why you are concerned about your nitrifying bacteria.
 

Butterfly

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If you leave your water alone the fish will acclimate to the ph, even one that high. Adding the Ph down just causes the Ph to fluctuate and that will kill your fish faster than the high Ph (sorry but I had to say it one more time. Its important)
Please refresh my memory as to how long this tank has been set up.
You have enough animals to provide all the ammonia and Nitrites the bacteria need for food In fact its a little overstocked.
Are you concerned because the shrimp are turning red?Where is it turning red? sometines the food they eat make them look a different color than usual.
Carol
 
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inari

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I have a 10 gallon i aclimated it way back in July. I had to go through a mini-cycle but no big that was back when i had just Inari. Anyway everytime my Bamboo shrimp turns read, they die usually that day or soon after...unless they turn back so i'm a bit confused. That is my major problem is my tank is cycled, but i get a really high pH the same day after i do a water change. One LFS owner said something about the hardness of my water that same day. My pH will alot of times spike up to an 8.4 from a 7.6 ish in a few hrs. that is my concern any ideas here?

thanx

~Inari
 

0morrokh

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Have you used ph down in the past? And what is the ph of the water coming out of your tap?
 
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inari

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i have used pH down due the fact that pH goes through the roof when it is time to change the water out. the tap water after being treated is 7.6 all it has is a dechlorinator in it i keep a reserve just in case something happens.
 

0morrokh

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so just to clarify, the pH straight out of the tap is 7.6, but then it goes up throughout the week until it reaches like 8. something? That's weird. Is there anything is the tank that could cause the water to harden? Like rocks, shells, corals, etc
 
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inari

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the water no matter what comes out at 7.6, by the end of the week in my tank the water that i pull out is an 8.2 when i test my water after the water change it is also 7.6 i have a pH lowering rock or atleast that is what i was told, in there some plants normal gravel and a plastic rock.
 

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What kind of filtration and aeration do you have?
 
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inari

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I have a whisper waterfall filter and an air stone ( i think that is what ur asking :S if it isn't I may need some help figureing out what it is )

~Inari
 

0morrokh

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Well, aeration can raise the pH a lot. You probably have a lot of oxygen in your water. I guess over the course of a week aeration could raise the pH that much.
 
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inari

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ok well from a chem back ground that makes some sense, but it is flawed in the fact that breathable oxygen is VERY stable. In the blood you need an enzyme to help your body use it otherwise you might as well be breathing in Carbon dioxide. I give you credit for your theory and it is plausible. I don't mean to rain on your prade (can't spell), just trying to think of everything possible any other ideas are more than welcome

~inari
 

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My advice is to remove the rock.
Aeration should not affect the pH, to the degree you are showing.
Unless the tanks is crammed with plants, there should still be enough nitrates for both bacteria and plants.
If possible, the pH can also be lowered by adding more plants.

Dino
 

0morrokh

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inari said:
ok well from a chem back ground that makes some sense, but it is flawed in the fact that breathable oxygen is VERY stable. In the blood you need an enzyme to help your body use it otherwise you might as well be breathing in Carbon dioxide. I give you credit for your theory and it is plausible. I don't mean to rain on your prade (can't spell), just trying to think of everything possible any other ideas are more than welcome

~inari
Actually this is not something I made up, I read an article once that a guy tested it out and claimed that aeration drastically increased his pH. I don't remember all the variables though.
 

Dino

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The line of reasoning that says areation raises pH is that the aeration causes a lowering of CO2 in the water.

Dino
 
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