Water level issues

bwreynolds

Member
I have a durso stand pipe. The tank is drilled in the back. About 2/3 the way up. I cannot get the water level where I want it. The drain also gets a full syphon it seems even though I have a hole drilled in the top with a valve to control the air flow.
the sump is filled about 7/8 and the display tank filled 3/4. I’d like those numbers to be switched.the tank either drains too fast or doesn’t drain at all.
 

saltwater60

Member
Post a picture. Sounds like tour joke isn’t large enough or is in the wrong stop possibly.
Could be too high of water flow?

 
  • Thread Starter

bwreynolds

Member
Here are some photos
The return pump is rated to move 1600gph not sure how much it is actually moving. The return pump is split to 2 3/4” returns and the drain is 1-1/2”
 

saltwater60

Member
I know one thing for sure that 90 elbow on the drain line isn’t helping you. I’d personally cut that you want install 2 45 elbows. I’d also size up the pipe one size for the drain line from the durso overflow parts inside the tank. You want some air space in there to break the syphon. That 90 isn’t helping that for sure.
 
  • Thread Starter

bwreynolds

Member
So you think I have too much flow? If I slow the flow it should help break syphon? I don’t need all of the flow as I can add some inside the tank if I really want it.
the 90 inside the tank?
 

saltwater60

Member
bwreynolds said:
So you think I have too much flow? If I slow the flow it should help break syphon? I don’t need all of the flow as I can add some inside the tank if I really want it.
the 90 inside the tank?
That’s very possible it’s too much flow. Cut it back and see what happens.
the 90 elbow I was referring to was the one that is under the stand right above the sump. 2 45’s there will stop the water from clogging up there and allow some air in the pipes. I’d do that anyway. A 90 elbow cuts the speednof the water in half basically. So right there it’s only equal to what. 3/4”pipe can handle. I think that will cause you trouble anyway down the road.
 
  • Thread Starter

bwreynolds

Member
Gotcha that makes sense. I’ll see if slowing the return helps
 
  • Thread Starter

bwreynolds

Member
slowing the return didn’t work. I’m starting to get ridiculously frustrated. As I have wasted probably 20 gallons of premixed saltwater trying to change water levels to see if that helps. Some of it ended up all over the floor of my house. I’m about to just pay a professional to come out. Please help as the hobby is already expensive and I’m way deeper into this tank than I ever imagined money wise.

1/4” vent hole in the top won’t drain at all then I put a valve on it then it drains too fast. It just won’t drain unless it syphoning. Now all I hear is gargling because it drains so fast then to not break syphon it just barely stays high enough.

What baffles me the most is I had it running the way I wanted it to run for 2 weeks then I added live rock and two clownfish and now its acting stupid.
 

John58ford

Member
Is the drain pipe in the tank a slip bulkhead fitting or glued? If it's a slip, I would buy a 5" or 6" cap, cut slots into the top of it 1/4" each, spaced 1/4 and just over 1/2" deep like a crown. Use a hole saw and drill it in the middle, then build a new pipe and elbow to hold it up in the tank like a suspended weir. If the drain gurgles like that, make a silencer cap for the whole assembly with a cap one size bigger with notches cut in it to match (remember since it's a circle they will be bigger and further than 1/4), then just set it on top. This type of drain inlet will permanently fix your water level in the display. The water will run about 1/4" up the teeth most likely but if you're pumping too fast you might need wider teeth.

I second saltwater60 on getting rid of the 90s over the sump, it looks like what you have there is actually running up hill, that in itself would start your siphon issue. I use 90s where I literally don't have the space for 45s but I slope my tubing as much as I can get away with to ensure its always downhill. That prevents accidental ful siphons or noisy air bubbles popping in the sump.
 
  • Thread Starter

bwreynolds

Member
I had a setup similar to that originally and it was crazy loud. That for sure had my levels right and flow right it was just really loud. Any idea how to quiet down what I had? I attached a pic
 

John58ford

Member
That drain would work similar to what I described, making one a much larger diameter and a funnel or bowl shape bottom would allow the water to create a swirl and it should run quieter in theory. The quietest drain is one where the water follows the outside diameter of the pipe (easy in theory but hard to make happen) having a smaller inlet usually causes surging and gargles as the water isn't directed to the outside diameter. A random flow pattern at your drain inlet will usually be noisy, especially if you're within 50% of max for the diameter on the flow rate.
 

saltwater60

Member
John58ford said:
That drain would work similar to what I described, making one a much larger diameter and a funnel or bowl shape bottom would allow the water to create a swirl and it should run quieter in theory. The quietest drain is one where the water follows the outside diameter of the pipe (easy in theory but hard to make happen) having a smaller inlet usually causes surging and gargles as the water isn't directed to the outside diameter. A random flow pattern at your drain inlet will usually be noisy, especially if you're within 50% of max for the diameter on the flow rate.
Well said.
 

saltwater60

Member
Here’s a good article for you on the durso overflow and needing low flow to be quiet.



You are most certainly moving too much water through it to be quiet. The article states about 25% of the flow. 1.5” pipe can handle 4800 gallons per hour. Divide that by 4 and you’re at about 1200 gallons per hour. Your return pump is over that. Then couple that with that 90 and the pipe running up hill and into the water if you’re over 600 gallon per hour your going to run into trouble.
Cut out that 90 below the tank and let it un straight into the sump an inch or two above the water line and see what happens. If you get the pipe above the water line you should be able to have a continuous siphon. Also the pipe that has a hole in it try remove the cap so it’s just open. That way you’ll have max air entering the pipe.
 
  • Thread Starter

bwreynolds

Member
Ok I’ll see what I can accomplish tomorrow. I’ll build my own drain funnel. Take that 90 out. Currently I have the ball valves on the two returns turned about half way.
 
  • Thread Starter

bwreynolds

Member
Do I need a valve on the drain?
 

John58ford

Member
You don't *need* the valve on the drain. In a non redundant system most would say to leave the valve out. I personally like to have a valve in the case that something happens to the sump and you need to hold back the water. I would leave it in the design personally. If you are not wanting to spend the $14 or however much that size valve costs though, you can definitely leave it out of the design.

I would do some math also, while you're designing your new drainage bowl. Make sure that there's enough room above your intended water line to hold however much water that last chamber (the pump chamber) holds. That way if the drain were to get plugged or fail somehow you couldn't flood your display before the pump runs dry. If you can't make the two add up, you can raise your pump higher in its chamber to run dry sooner. Just one of the things we need to consider if we aren't using secondary drains.
 

saltwater60

Member
If you do out the valve on the drain make sure it’s opening is a full 1.5”. Most ball valves have the part where the ball valve tubes gets smaller. That will be similar to the effect of the 90 elbow.
 

Latest threads

Top Bottom