Water flow and water line.

jpm995

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Don't most tanks have a decorative ring around the top edge so you don't see the water line? Mine has room for a 1/4 inch leveling error.
 
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Dave125g

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jpm995 said:
Don't most tanks have a decorative ring around the top edge so you don't see the water line? Mine has room for a 1/4 inch leveling error.
Most tanks have a frame yes. It's not that big. My big tanks frame is only about an inch wide.


Here's a video of a val leaf showing the current.
 

Momgoose56

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Dave125g said:
Penguin biowheal? I got 1 on my 40. It has the lip on the bottom to direct the water across the top. Yours does too
Okay, I see what you're saying, if that curved lip were submerged, water would flow out from it as opposed to it falling straight down (because gravity sucks) when the water level is lower. No arguement there. I amend my drawing:
20191031_112634.jpg
 

Rcslade124

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I have my hob in my 29 g towards the left to try and let my jetlifter push as far across the surface to agitate the water more. But I am seeing alot of micro bubbles from the hob so I'm def going to try and fill my tank to the hob and see interesting thread.
 
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Dave125g

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Momgoose56 said:
Okay, I see what you're saying, if that curved lip were submerged, water would flow out from it as opposed to it falling straight down (because gravity sucks) when the water level is lower. No arguement there. I amend my drawing:
View attachment 632191
Yep there it is.
 

Kevin1962

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mattgirl said:
Me too !!!! my 55 is about 1/4 inch lower on the right side so I have to live with a tiny water line. I have learned to live with it but wish it weren't so :( But I always keep my tanks filled high enough to keep the HOB's output below the water line.
My tank is 2mm low on the left and if I can see the waterline I think about reshimming the stand. So of course I fill so I can't see it.
 
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Dave125g

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Kevin1962 said:
My tank is 2mm low on the left and if I can see the waterline I think about reshimming the stand. So of course I fill so I can't see it.
Tough to get it any closer then that.
 

DoubleDutch

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Only doubting the waterflow comes like your two drawings Dave.

In the first I'd expect it not directly go down to the inlet and if the second would be correct there would only be circultation between the in and outlet still leaving 90% of the tank unfiltered.

But I still think the second is better.
I think even for aeration it is better (waterflow in the tank is more important than falling water into it)
 

Kevin1962

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Dave125g said:
Tough to get it any closer then that.
The stand is as close to perfect as 2 days of shimming could get it. Levels on the bottom glass say it's level.
Marineland trim? Not so much.
 
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Dave125g

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Kevin1962 said:
The stand is as close to perfect as 2 days of shimming could get it. Levels on the bottom glass say it's level.
Marineland trim? Not so much.
I have never been able to get my tanks perfectly level, so I simply try to get them to lean slightly toward the wall behind it. That way if it tips(for some odd reason) the wall stops it. Hopefully.
 

John58ford

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There is some merit to both lines of thought to be honest. However, no when water falls from a distance closer than terminal velocity, it does not lawn dart straight back down to the intake tube. (Ever throw a water balloon at a pool and see it splat right open in all directions, not sink?) On the other hand, the closer to the water line your outlet is, up until it touches, the pump had less static head to overcome and the gallons per hour will sightly increase.

Things change once you submerse an outlet however, then there is a presence of a slight back pressure (due to gravity of the tanks water, resistance and convergence), and surface tension will no longer be in your favor, there will be a decrease in gph upon submerging any filter types outlet. There's also the chance of tank stock or snails finding their way in allot easier.

As allot of people say, there is merit to testing various levels and setting your tank up the best way you can to meet it's specific needs. The idea to use semi Buoyant items, such as fish pellets to see your flow is a good idea and most people should give it a try.

Thanks for opening this post, if for nothing more than to encourage some thought.
 

Momgoose56

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John58ford said:
There is some merit to both lines of thought to be honest. However, no when water falls from a distance closer than terminal velocity, it does not lawn dart straight back down to the intake tube. (Ever throw a water balloon at a pool and see it splat right open in all directions, not sink?) On the other hand, the closer to the water line your outlet is, up until it touches, the pump had less static head to overcome and the gallons per hour will sightly increase.

Things change once you submerse an outlet however, then there is a presence of a slight back pressure (due to gravity of the tanks water, resistance and convergence), and surface tension will no longer be in your favor, there will be a decrease in gph upon submerging any filter types outlet. There's also the chance of tank stock or snails finding their way in allot easier.

As allot of people say, there is merit to testing various levels and setting your tank up the best way you can to meet it's specific needs. The idea to use semi Buoyant items, such as fish pellets to see your flow is a good idea and most people should give it a try.

Thanks for opening this post, if for nothing more than to encourage some thought.
Fish pellets!! I haven't found anything that works (but I've been trying different beans-3 different lentils, anasazi, dried chick peas, even freeze dried rice... etc.) But all are either too buoyant or too dense. Slow sinking pellets would work! I have to get some...
 
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Dave125g

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Best way to test it is in an empty tank with food coloring put right into the HOB. You'll be able to clearly see where the water goes out of the filter output.
 

Momgoose56

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Dave125g said:
Best way to test it is in an empty tank with food coloring put right into the HOB. You'll be able to clearly see where the water goes out of the filter output.
I do have a 10 gallon 'dry docked' QT tank. Lol! I'll have to get liquid food coloring and an assistant (granddaughter) for a liquid test. Plus the you tube stuff. My minor was Informatics but I have no idea how to upload videos onto you tube!
 
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Dave125g

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John58ford said:
I have done this on many more complex set ups and couldn't agree more. You can also use water conditioner in the right lighting for a similar effect.
Yeah that has a bit of a shimmy to it when adding it to water.
 

aussieJJDude

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A lot of this could be solved with some DIY ingenuity. A rew aquarists set up their hobs by adding PVC and some elbows so the intake is on thr opposite side to the outake, like a glorified hang on canister....
 

mattgirl

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Just some of my observations....

I have to think my 2 HOB's and 2 dual sponge filters in my 55 gallon tank circulate the water as much as is necessary. All of the filters are across the back of the tank. dual sponges in each back corner and 2 HOB's equally dividing up the space between the sponges. When I add liquid ferts I normally squirt them in a front corner. It kinda shimmers so I can watch it as it almost immediately spreads throughout the tank.

Although it appears that the water falls straight down from my cascade 300 hob filters it actually doesn't. The proof is the fact that floating plants are pushed to the front of the tank. Then kinda circle around and end up in the back under the filters only to either be pushed under the water or right back to the front again. Without being corralled the floating plants are constantly on the move.

I try to keep the hornwort contained on the left side of the tank but often stray sprigs end up at the other end of the tank. Sometimes on top but often tangled in the low growing plants on the right side toward the front of the tank. This is telling me that there is constant movement throughout the tank and I think a lot of it can be attributed to the fact that I keep my tank filled to the top. When doing water changes the output is of course above the water line. During that time any loose plants stay where they are in the tank but are pushed straight down. This tells me that there is less circulation during that time.
 
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